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View Poll Results: Most Italian city outside Europe?
New York City, NY 57 25.11%
New Haven, CT 1 0.44%
Providence, RI 9 3.96%
Boston, MA 4 1.76%
Philadelphia, PA 4 1.76%
Toronto, ON 23 10.13%
Melbourne, Australia 12 5.29%
Sydney, Australia 1 0.44%
Perth, Australia 1 0.44%
Buenos Aires, Argentina 78 34.36%
Montevideo, Uruguay 8 3.52%
Other 29 12.78%
Voters: 227. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-15-2012, 10:29 AM
 
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Buenos aires hands down. Obviously most of you haven't been there.

Like 50% of the population is of Italian descent, they speak Spanish with an Italian accent and the only cuisine to eat there really is either Argentine or Italian. When I went there I was actually so sick of Italian food because Italian food co pro isles like 75% of the restaurants there.

 
Old 09-15-2012, 11:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoist123 View Post
Buenos aires hands down. Obviously most of you haven't been there.

Like 50% of the population is of Italian descent, they speak Spanish with an Italian accent and the only cuisine to eat there really is either Argentine or Italian. When I went there I was actually so sick of Italian food because Italian food co pro isles like 75% of the restaurants there.
I've been to Buenos Aires twice. I loved everything about it. It feels just like Europe and the people have a zest for life. Actually, about 35 to 40% is of Italian descent. But they are very removed from their Italian ties and are basically more Spaniard at this point, with immigration having ceased a long time ago. And what's wrong with Italian-accented Spanish? I love listening to Argentines speak.

I voted based on connectedness to Italy, and I still think it's Toronto. New York's Italian community has, for the most part, gone into the Melting Pot except for immature Guido displays of their heritage.
 
Old 09-15-2012, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sulkiercupid View Post
This is quite an interesting article by an Italian American about the Italian influences in BA.
http://www.niaf.org/publications/amb...enos-Aires.pdf
loved this article! It is pretty accurate about the kind of italian influence BA haves.


Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
I've been to Buenos Aires twice. I loved everything about it. It feels just like Europe and the people have a zest for life. Actually, about 35 to 40% is of Italian descent. But they are very removed from their Italian ties and are basically more Spaniard at this point, with immigration having ceased a long time ago. And what's wrong with Italian-accented Spanish? I love listening to Argentines speak.

I voted based on connectedness to Italy, and I still think it's Toronto. New York's Italian community has, for the most part, gone into the Melting Pot except for immature Guido displays of their heritage.



mmmh less than 50%? Im not sure.
About 75% of the people i know haves Italian last names, and in the article says that most argentinians are of italian descent, but it could be that you are right, and still Italy is number 1 country that people descend of here in arg.

its weird cause i could actually say "Im gonna give my opinion as an italian-argentinian" but the weird thing is that the term "italian-argentinan" does not exist! I have the italian nationality and my dad, aunt, grandparents, was born in italy. I have zillons of relatives in italy. I have had the nationality since i was a kid. That would qualify as being an "italian-argentinian", you would think? But, the term does not exist here. Even my dad, who WAS BORN in Italy (her parents came here when he was 1 year old), doesnt refeer himself as an "italian-argentinian".
This is the case with most people i know: they have the nationality, parents or grandparents were born there, etc, etc, etc, but still, nobody uses the term "italian-argentinian". We are argentinians.

Thats how deep the italian culture is in here. We have SO MANY THINGS italian, but mixed so much with our typical argentinian things, and together they formed a new thing: the argentinian culture.
You wont find one single peson here does refeer at himself as an "italian" or "italian argentina" but you would realize most of us have italian lastnames, everyone speaks with an italian accent, we eat italian food and have a warm and hot blooded character like italians.

Thats why BA is different than those other places, Italy influence is so deep into this culture, that we dont idenfity this or that as "italian". But we all know were we came from and find a deep connection to our mother land. At least i do, and i will be going to italy for the first time in less than a week to visit all my realitves!
 
Old 09-15-2012, 03:21 PM
 
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Schenectady, NY
 
Old 09-15-2012, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Paris, France
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When I flew on Alitalia to Melbourne and later saw Melbourne, I definitely felt that Melbourne was the most Italian city that I had every seen outside of Italy.

However, the very first foreign city in which pizza arrived was Marseille (followed by New York).
 
Old 09-15-2012, 03:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kerouac2 View Post
When I flew on Alitalia to Melbourne and later saw Melbourne, I definitely felt that Melbourne was the most Italian city that I had every seen outside of Italy.

However, the very first foreign city in which pizza arrived was Marseille (followed by New York).
Melbourne IS the Italian mecca in Australia, and I have relatives there. My Dad also lived there for a couple of years when he was young and Australia was easier to get into than the U.S. Alitalia finally pulled Australia service, seeing that it was far and they couldn't do it non-stop. Kind of sad.

As for the Buenos Aires mix, I've heard the composition is as follows:
- 50% Spanish
- 35% Italian
- 15% other (including Portuguese, Greek, German, Japenese, Korean, Jewish, and others)
 
Old 09-15-2012, 03:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SophieLL View Post
Thats why BA is different than those other places, Italy influence is so deep into this culture, that we dont idenfity this or that as "italian". But we all know were we came from and find a deep connection to our mother land. At least i do, and i will be going to italy for the first time in less than a week to visit all my realitves!
I'm not doubting that. But the Toronto people I know are often immigrants or first-gen and fill up both Alitalia and Air Canada planes to Rome on a daily basis. During the summer, flights are oversold and it's a zoo in the Alitalia waiting area as they try to coax people to give up seats. I saw this happen once. It was both sad and funny. I wasn't giving up my seat. With the thunderstorms, we got out 3.5 hours late!
 
Old 09-15-2012, 03:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeIsWhere... View Post
Yes...good question/point. Although Chicago is not an option in this survey (maybe by virtue of their numbers, maybe because of their assimilation, maybe something else) but they are certainly 'proud to be Italian', even in the best possible description of that term, still today!
While Chicago has it's fair share of Italian heritage and people, it should not be mentioned in this thread at all. Maybe within the U.S., but not globally.
 
Old 09-15-2012, 05:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoist123 View Post
While Chicago has it's fair share of Italian heritage and people, it should not be mentioned in this thread at all. Maybe within the U.S., but not globally.
No offense, but Midwest Italians (Chicago Melrose Park, St Louis The Hill, or Cleveland OH) are not as Italian as those on the East Coast, who are becoming less Italian by the day themselves.

And the small enclaves in Omaha and Des Moines hardly make a dent.
 
Old 09-15-2012, 06:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertpolyglot View Post
No offense, but Midwest Italians (Chicago Melrose Park, St Louis The Hill, or Cleveland OH) are not as Italian as those on the East Coast, who are becoming less Italian by the day themselves.

And the small enclaves in Omaha and Des Moines hardly make a dent.
Uhm I agree, and what are you talking about? Someone said Chicago should be in this thread and I disagreed saying it shouldn't. Chicago has it's Italians, but it certainly is not an Italian city. Never said that Italians in Chicago are as an Italian on the East Coast......
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