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View Poll Results: Most Italian city outside Europe?
New York City, NY 57 25.11%
New Haven, CT 1 0.44%
Providence, RI 9 3.96%
Boston, MA 4 1.76%
Philadelphia, PA 4 1.76%
Toronto, ON 23 10.13%
Melbourne, Australia 12 5.29%
Sydney, Australia 1 0.44%
Perth, Australia 1 0.44%
Buenos Aires, Argentina 78 34.36%
Montevideo, Uruguay 8 3.52%
Other 29 12.78%
Voters: 227. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-23-2017, 02:51 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,736 posts, read 2,530,516 times
Reputation: 1340

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Ticino - good one!


Maybe Malta as well? (Though not as much as Ticino.) What do people think?
I have to recognise my failure, because now I saw that the topic is about italian cities outside Europe (and Switzerland is still in Europe, though not in EU).

I can name a town in southern Brazil called Antonio Prado, where the population speaks Italian currently (in fact a venetian dialect called "talian"), and the language is mandatory in all of the schools. But I guess that Argentina and USA may have many more towns and cities like this.

 
Old 10-23-2017, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,086,303 times
Reputation: 11652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
I have to recognise my failure, because now I saw that the topic is about italian cities outside Europe (and Switzerland is still in Europe, though not in EU).

I

And me too for Malta!
 
Old 10-23-2017, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
7,501 posts, read 6,301,802 times
Reputation: 3761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Toronto isn't even the most Italian-feeling city *in Canada* IMO. (Assuming that any Canadian city truly has that, anyway.)


There seems to be a group of City-Data users who systematically vote "Toronto" in every single poll on here.
Downtown Toronto has a british turn to its north american architecture. The brick houses, victorian stuff... although I guess it's probably very similar to most NE American cities.
 
Old 10-23-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,086,303 times
Reputation: 11652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
I have to recognise my failure, because now I saw that the topic is about italian cities outside Europe (and Switzerland is still in Europe, though not in EU).

I can name a town in southern Brazil called Antonio Prado, where the population speaks Italian currently (in fact a venetian dialect called "talian"), and the language is mandatory in all of the schools. But I guess that Argentina and USA may have many more towns and cities like this.
I don't think there is anywhere in the US where Italian has any level of "officialdom" like that (eg being taught in public schools).


I doubt it's the case in Argentina either. Argentinians have pretty diverse origins but the country has a high level of linguistic and cultural convergence - more than Brazil I'd say.
 
Old 10-24-2017, 06:25 AM
 
Location: Illinois
3,208 posts, read 3,564,239 times
Reputation: 4256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
The Italian influence in the US and Australia is just one of many cultural infusions as well, so while its a visible thread in the national fabric, its only one strand. The Italian influence in Australia is pretty obvious, but it doesn't necessarily stand out any more than Greek, Vietnamese, Chinese, Indian, Pacific Islander, Serbian/Croation, and quite a few others others.

Most fishing ports in Australia have an annual blessing of the fleet service, which originated in the Mediterranean. Not sure if its also a part of the US fishing port culture. This is Port Pirie in South Australia, which is far from the most multicultural town in Australia, where it has been celebrated since the 1920's: The centuries-old Italian festival still celebrated in an Aussie country town - ABC North and West SA - Australian Broadcasting Corporation
I agree that Italian culture is visible in the United States and Australia, but the United States and Australia did not receive nearly as many Italian immigrants as Brazil and Argentina did. Brazil and Argentina responded with enthusiasm to Italian immigrants, while the United States in particular, reacted with some hostility to the newly arrived swarthy Catholics. Italian Americans have done a lot to assimilate into 'American' culture. Their assimilation is a point of pride for many of them, especially the older generation.
 
Old 01-03-2023, 02:33 AM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
2,314 posts, read 1,534,360 times
Reputation: 4885
In the ten years since this poll was set up, the demographics in Australia has changed very considerably. The old Italians are dying off, there were now only 171,000 Italian born Australians as recorded in the 2021 census.

About a million Australians claim some Italian ancestry they well may be like my kids who have ancestry from Italy, Scotland, England, Germany and France. Or our cousin, who is half Italian and half Cambodian ancestory.
What were the Italian districts of Sydney and Melbourne are now increasingly Asian, with Italian restaurants closing and being replaced by Chinese, Thai, Nepalese and Indian restaurants.

So yes, definitely Australian cities would not come near to being considered anything like Italian cities and actually never were. However that is not to deny that Italian culture has had some influence on Australian culture, especially after WW2. Before then the only type of pasta that was eaten here was canned spaghetti, generally served on toast for breakfast. Tea was ubiquitous and coffee thought to be exotic.
 
Old 01-03-2023, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Somewhere on the Moon.
10,138 posts, read 15,024,668 times
Reputation: 10452
Quote:
Originally Posted by jessemh431 View Post
The Spanish spoken in BA has definite influences from the Italian language though
That and they speak with their hands. Italians know what I mean. lol

Ironically, the first Argentine I met was one of my teachers, but I don't remember seeing her gesturing with her hands when she spoke (the entire course was in Spanish, so it wasn't as if she was speaking a language that wasn't her mother tongue). Then again, I was a kid then of 7 or 8 years old. There are many details I didn't notice then.

I have met several Argetinians since and sure enough, in several occasions noticed the hands thing.

I'm certain that's a trait they got from Italy and/or Italians.
 
Old 01-03-2023, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
2,314 posts, read 1,534,360 times
Reputation: 4885
In a discussion on a forum people are entitled to express their opinions but in a way which is respectful to someone with whom you may not agree. When you cross from being critical of their opinions to calling them things like delusional, you cross a line and then are repeatedly blocked.

As far as Australia goes, many of us are thankful for our British heritage, including many of our Asian newcomers. This is shown in the fairly lukewarm response to the country becoming a republic and cutting formal ties with the UK.
However, people who think the country is still nearly entirely of British background are possibly accessing old data online and probably have not visited the country in the last ten years.

I am actually not sure what is the issue that provokes so much anger. Obviously the US us very racially and culturally diverse. But not everyone thinks that is the ideal situation. Countries like Japan value their monoculturalism. If there was one recipe for a peaceful and harmonious world, I think it would have been found by now.
 
Old 01-03-2023, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Toronto
15,102 posts, read 15,906,261 times
Reputation: 5202
So taking out the emotion and hysteria i'm seeing in here - and not getting into most but just significant - No Toronto performing well on this list isn't just blind boosterism.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italia...r_Toronto_Area

Quote:
Toronto has a large Italian Canadian community, with 30.3 per cent of the ethnic Italians in Canada living in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) as of 2021.[1] Toronto is home to the fourth largest population of people of Italian descent after São Paulo, Buenos Aires and New York City, respectively. As of the Canada 2021 Census, there were 468,970 Italian Canadians located in the Greater Toronto Area, with 444,755 located within the Toronto CMA.
The Italian community is well rooted in Toronto for a long time and its population significant. This has nothing to do with British vs U.S anything. Give it a rest reincarnated newbie.

Last edited by fusion2; 01-03-2023 at 09:41 PM..
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