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View Poll Results: ?
Qatar 2 0.67%
United Arab Emirates 9 3.03%
Australia 10 3.37%
Canada 38 12.79%
United States of America 165 55.56%
Singapore 14 4.71%
United Kingdom 15 5.05%
Brazil 13 4.38%
Other 31 10.44%
Voters: 297. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-30-2012, 05:18 AM
 
Location: FIN
888 posts, read 1,591,996 times
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Enough with facts, and enough with waving the american flag. I'll vote for Bhutan.
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Old 09-30-2012, 05:52 AM
 
497 posts, read 983,754 times
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Personally, I don't think the USA should win this. The USA is diverse, but many of the main groups (white-excluding Middle Easterners, African American-excluding the recent migrants from Africa, and Hispanics) are Western cultured.
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Old 09-30-2012, 05:55 AM
 
455 posts, read 1,132,101 times
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I would say the US even though canada is quite close. In canada the majority of the diversity is based in the large cities. The majority of canada's towns and smaller cities are still a great deal majority white. The US ethnic minorities seem to be still somewhat prevalent in areas outside of just the large cities, althought the majority of those tend to be hispanic.
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:43 AM
 
347 posts, read 695,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhatTheHellMan View Post
Why do you lump all of Europe together? There are significant ethnic, cultural, linguistic and aesthetic differences across the board. Talking of "Asian" descent is just as nondescript as "European" descent.
I only lumped Europe together because Trimac lumped Asian together. If he lumped Asian together then by the same logic he should have lumped Europe.
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Old 09-30-2012, 08:55 AM
 
Location: London
1,068 posts, read 2,022,385 times
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USA followed by the UK or France. The US has probably the most diverse demographics as the US encompasses large waves of immigration from countries like Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Haiti, Cuba, Central America and South that for obvious geographical logistics aren't as prevalent in the UK or Europe.

The UK has alot of South American hubs in south London in areas like Streatham and it is a growing population in the UK, especially the Brazilian population because of the EU membership of Portugal which has seen a growing base here for Portugeuse and Brazilians who tend to congregate in locations like Brixton to the south of London and Harlesden to the North West which historically have been the heart of London's African/carribean communities with a small but significant Irish and Eastern European presence too in Harlesden as in most parts of NW London.

Apart from that all the immigration seen in the US is replicated in the UK. Both have alot of Irish immigration or long term Irish families in the major cities. Both have large waves of immigration from India, Pakistan, Africa, the Carribean and the middle-East countries. Both have large Chinese, Greek, Polish, Russian populations too.

I'd say the Jewish population of London is even on a par with New York's, especially in Edgware Hampstead and Golders Green but I couldn't be certain. I think large waves of immigration from South Asian countries like Bangladesh, Pakistan and India have been happening alot longer than the US however though on my last visit to New York it certainly looked like the Indian and Pakistani population was making up for lost time.

So overall I'd say the United States. However London is more integrated as is most of the UK with the exception of northern areas such as Blackburn, Oldham and Bradford where there are stark cultural contrasts between neighbourhoods.
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:18 AM
 
455 posts, read 1,132,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fear&Whiskey View Post
USA followed by the UK or France. The US has probably the most diverse demographics as the US encompasses large waves of immigration from countries like Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Haiti, Cuba, Central America and South that for obvious geographical logistics aren't as prevalent in the UK or Europe.

The UK has alot of South American hubs in south London in areas like Streatham and it is a growing population in the UK, especially the Brazilian population because of the EU membership of Portugal which has seen a growing base here for Portugeuse and Brazilians who tend to congregate in locations like Brixton to the south of London and Harlesden to the North West which historically have been the heart of London's African/carribean communities with a small but significant Irish and Eastern European presence too in Harlesden as in most parts of NW London.

Apart from that all the immigration seen in the US is replicated in the UK. Both have alot of Irish immigration or long term Irish families in the major cities. Both have large waves of immigration from India, Pakistan, Africa, the Carribean and the middle-East countries. Both have large Chinese, Greek, Polish, Russian populations too.

I'd say the Jewish population of London is even on a par with New York's, especially in Edgware Hampstead and Golders Green but I couldn't be certain. I think large waves of immigration from South Asian countries like Bangladesh, Pakistan and India have been happening alot longer than the US however though on my last visit to New York it certainly looked like the Indian and Pakistani population was making up for lost time.

So overall I'd say the United States. However London is more integrated as is most of the UK with the exception of northern areas such as Blackburn, Oldham and Bradford where there are stark cultural contrasts between neighbourhoods.
I'm sorry this comment just got my attention. How is london's jewish population anywhere near comparable to new york's? The new york metropolitan area has near 2 million jews. All of the uk has under 300,000 jews with london under 200,000. In europe i know paris has a considerably larger jewish population than london.
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Where the heart is...
4,927 posts, read 5,316,274 times
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Default Yes...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I was surprised to hear that France gets a wide variety of immigrants from all over the world. Someone was telling me that their son in gradeschool in Paris had a Mongolian classmate. So even though the US has a reputation for being very multicultural and a prime destination for immigrants, I'm voting for France. Enough with the American flag-waving, already.
as a matter of fact, as opposed to merely a reputaion for being very multicultural and a prime destination for immigrants, as of 2009 the U.S. counts 38.5 million foreign-born residents, which is 12.5% of the total population.

Because the facts support the U.S. reputation for being very multicultural and a prime destination for immigrants it isn't really about American flag waving, but rather simply, the fact of the matter.

List of countries by foreign-born population in 2005 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the United States, multiculturalism is not clearly established in policy at the federal level, but ethnic diversity is common in both rural and urban areas, see Race and ethnicity in the United States...The Melting Pot tradition co-exists with a belief in national unity, dating from the American founding fathers...

however, let's give credit where credit is due...GO CANADA

The Canadian government has often been described as the instigator of multicultural ideology because of its public emphasis on the social importance of immigration. The Canadian Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism is often refereed to as the origins of modern political awareness of multiculturalism. In the Western English-speaking countries, multiculturalism as an official national policy started in Canada in 1971...

Support for multiculturalism

Multiculturalism is seen by its supporters as a fairer system that allows people to truly express who they are within a society, that is more tolerant and that adapts better to social issues. They argue that culture is not one definable thing based on one race or religion, but rather the result of multiple factors that change as the world changes.

Historically, support for modern multiculturalism stems from the changes in Western societies after World War II, in what Susanne Wessendorf calls the "human rights revolution", in which the horrors of institutionalized racism and ethnic cleansing became almost impossible to ignore in the wake of the Holocaust; with the collapse of the European colonial system, as colonized nations in Africa and Asia successfully fought for their independence and pointed out the racist underpinnings of the colonial system; and, in the United States in particular, with the rise of the Civil Rights Movement, which criticized ideals of assimilation that often led to prejudices against those who did not act according to Anglo-American standards and which led to the development of academic ethnic studies programs as a way to counteract the neglect of contributions by racial minorities in classrooms.As this history shows, multiculturalism in Western countries was seen as a useful set of strategies to combat racism, to protect minority communities of all types, and to undo policies that had prevented minorities from having full access to the opportunities for freedom and equality promised by the liberalism that has been the hallmark of Western societies since the Age of Enlightenment.


Best regards, sincerely

HomeIsWhere...

Last edited by HomeIsWhere...; 09-30-2012 at 10:21 AM..
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Old 09-30-2012, 10:25 AM
 
Location: London
1,068 posts, read 2,022,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
I'm sorry this comment just got my attention. How is london's jewish population anywhere near comparable to new york's? The new york metropolitan area has near 2 million jews. All of the uk has under 300,000 jews with london under 200,000. In europe i know paris has a considerably larger jewish population than london.
Well in the metropolitan area yes, but in the city no. Paris that is:- Jewish population by urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

As for London the Jewish population is more on a par with San Francisco's than New York's so yes New York is far more Jewish than London.

So let's pretend I made the comparison with San Francisco instead and we'll all whistle and walk away and make believe this never happened. Those Jewish neighbourhoods are next door or pretty close by to the (it has changed in demographics in recent years) predominantly Irish neighbourhood where I grew up so it always felt that way to me. You understand? Well don't you?

We're good. Right. Jewish New York. I'm sorry.
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Old 09-30-2012, 02:02 PM
 
769 posts, read 1,007,331 times
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*NOTE: In this post I have classified Hispanics as a racial group. Technically, I know that they are not one and that the "term" and "classification" was created by the US government during the 1970's, but you all know what I'm saying, so bare with me, please. *


The United States of America. I think the USA has, by far, the best all-around package when it comes to diversity. Its White population is the most diverse of all the new world countries (people literally from any and every country in Europe). It doesn't really have one or two main nationalities that dominate the makeup of the White populations like in other new world countries such as Australia or Canada (i.e. Australia's white population is dominantly from the British Isles, and Canada's white population is still largely British Isles and French). Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying these are the only ethnicities among people of European descent, but they are the majority for sure in these two particular countries. The US is more diversified here and doesn't have a group or two that really dominates like these other countries do. In addition, the US also has a massive black population derived both from the ancestors from the times of slavery, as well as from modern immigration, a massive Hispanic population (far from just being Mexicans, but TONS and TONS of people from Central America, the Caribbean, and South America too), and a substantial and ever-increasing Asian population (Asians have just overtaken Hispanics as the largest source of immigration to the USA as a matter of fact). The US is roughly 64% white as of 2010, a number that is lower than other comparable new world nations. The USA is also home to the city (NYC) with the most spoken languages on earth (numbering about 800 according to the NY Times). In the future too, as predicted by the 2010 US Census, the USA looks to add even more to it's overall diversity and will be by 2050, 46% white, 30% Hispanic, 13% Black, and 9% Asian (throw in the extra 1-2% for Hawaiian and Alaskan natives and Native Americans).

Canada is still around 80% or more white. Plus, as I stated above, that white population is overwhelmingly still derived from the British Isles and France. Yes, Canada has a large born-oversees population, but that doesn't necessarily equal diverse. Again, the huge, huge majority of these people immigrating to Canada are Asian (and come especially from China, HK, and India). The black and hispanic populations of Canada are extremely small compared to the ones in the USA. Thus, I don't feel that Canada is as well-rounded in its diversity as the USA is. Another thing to remember about foreign-born populations is that different countries have different immigration systems and might only allow in a smaller % of people than other countries. Countries like Canada and Australia tend to be "easier" to immigrate to than the USA. The USA also has higher birthrates than both Canada and Australia and this, too, means that it doesn't necessarily mean that it needs a larger % of people to immigrate.

Australia is still roughly 90% white and the overwhelming majority of those people are derived from the British Isles (more so than Canada). It has extremely small black and hispanic populations. It, like Canada, does have a large and growing Asian population due to immigration though. However, and again like Canada, it just doesn't offer an all-around picture of diversity as much as the USA being mainly White and Asian.

I think after the USA, Brazil is actually the country with the most diversity. It has a wide variety of Whites derived from many European nations (although not as many as the USA), and has the largest African population outside of Africa. It doesn't really have a lot of immigration from other Latin American nations and while it has a (small) Asian population, it is almost entirely made up of people of Japanese decent. There isn't a whole lot of other Asian peoples there and doesn't nearly have the Asian diversity of nations like the USA, Canada, or Australia. I think Brazil is more mixed (Although interracial marriages in the USA are at an all-time high (1 out of 7 I believe now) and are increasing drastically), but the USA is overall more diverse.

Thus from all of this, my rankings would be:

1) USA
2) Brazil
-------------
3) Canada
-------------
4) Australia

Other countries just off the top of my head, in no particular rank, after these four are:

-UK
-France
- Netherlands
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Old 09-30-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Keizer, OR
1,370 posts, read 3,054,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by owenc View Post
Definitely the USA shortly followed by the UK.

Canada? No....
Clearly you've never been to Toronto or Vancouver.
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