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View Poll Results: Which country offers a better quality of living for the average person?
Canada 68 57.14%
United States 51 42.86%
Voters: 119. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-06-2012, 04:59 AM
 
2,096 posts, read 4,782,035 times
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I used to want to live in Canada, because I prefer colder climates, the women are beautiful, the people are not as conservative, and (I thought) the people were friendly. I like how partisanship and gun culture doesn't dominate their politics, and how the people are pretty much apolitical in general for the most part. I also like how they don't view themselves as "number one" in everything.

Plus, I've always been not too much of a fan of the United States. Even the liberal parts of the US are conservative compared to just about every other part of the Western world, I dislike the militarism and consumerism of US culture, and our infrastructure generally speaking is old and sucks.

Lately though, I've also given up on my 'Canadian dream' of someday living in Canada. I think there's a snobbiness to Canadian culture. They're not the fun loving, beer swilling 'hoo's it goin' eh' Bob and Doug McKenzie type easy going folks that they once, or maybe never were.

I feel like as an American I'd never be accepted there, because usually when I've told a Canadian I wanted to live there, they take it negatively and say 'why not just move somewhere else in the States' or 'You won't ever be able to make it'.

The more I learn about Canada too, the less appealing it sounds. It's harder to make money, virtually everything costs more, except healthcare which you still have to pay for, albeit with taxes.

Really, America offers a better life in my opinion unless you are poor, or very rich and can actually afford all the wonderful activities cities like Vancouver and Toronto offer on a regular basis.

I actually spent a night in the Downtown Eastside with someone I befriended in downtown Vancouver last summer and the conditions at his council house were abysmal. Bugs everywhere, no bathrooms in the apartments, only nasty public bathrooms in the hallway. Being poor in Canada might not be as bad as being poor here in the States, but it's certainly not a picnic. I'd actually rather live in a tent as a homeless person in America than live in a crappy council house in urban Canada. And I don't plan on immigrating somewhere only to be poor.

I've also heard Canadians are incredibly unfriendly towards strangers and even cold towards their own families in some cases. To the point where Americans are perceived as being friendly in comparison. Which is downright scary because Americans are in my opinion incredibly unfriendly people on the whole who nearly always act like you don't exist and wouldn't **** on you if you were on fire. I'm not saying that people shouldn't be left alone to mind their own business or anything, because they should, but when people think it's creepy just because you smile at them, they obviously need to get the f*ck over themselves.

I've also heard it's almost impossible to meet people of the opposite sex in Canada, which sucks because their women sure are beautiful.

I'd still take anywhere in Canada over Texas or some other 90 degree sunbelt hellhole, but honestly I think I'd rather stay put here in the Northwest than move to BC or Ontario like I once wanted to.

And I'm not saying 'Oh, America is actually perfect' because there's tons of things I despise about this country. But at least it's my country, and at least America has 50 different states and 4 different regions that all have slight differences from each other as far as culture and quality of life. And Canadian cities, especially their downtowns blow the US cities out of the water as far as stuff to do, vibrancy and beauty.

What do you think? Which country offers a better quality of life?
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Old 12-06-2012, 05:48 AM
 
Location: NYC/D.C.
362 posts, read 666,251 times
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they are about the same with the U.S. having much more of the good and bad since it ten times their population. Also both countries have about the same median percapita income. Overall, i would choose the U.S. with the much larger variety of cities, climate and geography.
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Old 12-06-2012, 05:55 AM
 
16,431 posts, read 22,219,437 times
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I disagree that Canada and the US are essentialy the same. I think Canada has retained it's heritage and traditions much better than the mongrelized and culturaly polluted US.
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Old 12-06-2012, 06:00 AM
 
Location: Where the heart is...
4,927 posts, read 5,323,162 times
Reputation: 10674
The World’s Best Places To Live
Tue, Dec 4, 2012

Can there be a city that is crime and pollution free, with excellent public transport and great schools to boast?

Human resources consulting firm Mercer has put together a list of cities that come closest to offering you all that. In its 2012 Quality of Living report it looks at living conditions in 221 cities worldwide and ranks them against New York as a base city in 10 categories - economy, socio-cultural environment, politics, education, and healthcare.

5. Vancouver, Canada
Vancouver is the only Canadian and North American city to make the top 10 list this year, similar to 2011.

The World

America’s Best States to Live in 2012
Jul 10, 2012

Top States for Quality of Life
The best places to do business are also the best places to live. At least that’s how many states market
themselves to the public. CNBC’s Top States for Business study found quality of life is among the most
frequently mentioned selling points in state economic development campaigns. That’s why quality of life
is one of the most important categories in our study of America’s Top States for Business, worth 350 out of 2,500 possible points.

America’s Best States to Live in 2012

These 10 Countries Have The Highest Quality Of Life
May 22, 2012

If you're searching for the country where residents tend to have the happiest lives, head down under to Australia, where people earn only $26,000 a year, but live to be 82 years old, according to the OECD's
newest Better Life Index.

Norway and the United States are close behind.

10 Top Countries OECD Better Life Index - Business Insider

Good luck and...

Best regards, sincerely

HomeIsWhere...
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Old 12-06-2012, 07:28 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
9,380 posts, read 14,335,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post

... Canadian culture. They're not the fun loving, beer swilling 'hoo's it goin' eh' Bob and Doug McKenzie type easy going folks ...

What do you think? Which country offers a better quality of life?
It sounds like you are somewhere around 18-22 years old with issues in your personal life, most likely family and other close relationships. You probably also have not yet focused on a program of study or profession.

An ancient expression: you can change your sky, but you can't change your mind.

So the type of question you ask is a smoke screen.

You need to carve out a niche and a mesh for yourself in terms of work, personal relationships, and cultural interests.

It seems like you are focused on having fun and drinking beer.

Try growing up first a bit, perhaps concentrate on a technical skill or three, and make yourself useful to people who have the means to pay, then you can decide where you might want to try to apply your skills in terms of quality of life.

I know a lot of people who wanted to be rock stars without paying the dues in terms of musical chops, for example, and they wound up being life-long potheads, liberal or not.

In short, the quality of life depends on how you apply yourself to the world.

The quality of life does not depend on how the world applies to you which, on the contrary, is a fatally distorted viewpoint that leads to misery.


I lived in Canada one year as a graduate student - finance, statistics and general business administration -, I paid for it, loved it, respected the Canadians as hard-nosed business people like everywhere else - and also as the inventors of the financial options formula (among many other innovations), wound up elsewhere on the planet in the ensuing years, grateful to them for the education which I gainfully applied on world markets.

Good Luck!


P.S. To HomeIsWhere, in that Mercer survey, didn't San Francisco and Honolulu come out on top among exclusively US cities?

Last edited by bale002; 12-06-2012 at 07:42 AM..
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:04 AM
 
2,042 posts, read 2,907,445 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
I disagree that Canada and the US are essentialy the same. I think Canada has retained it's heritage and traditions much better than the mongrelized and culturaly polluted US.
If you're going to go around correcting small errors, that would be 'its', not 'it's' and 'culturally', not 'culturaly'.

Your post, of course, is meant to be provocative. However, it is so ignorant, fallacious in scope, and historical inaccurate that it only serves to make the reader feel better about not having been born, well, you.
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,770,867 times
Reputation: 999
Canada
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:13 AM
 
16,431 posts, read 22,219,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffpv View Post
If you're going to go around correcting small errors, that would be 'its', not 'it's' and 'culturally', not 'culturaly'.
Touche. However, I was not trying to be provocative. That is what I truly think. I admire Canada in many ways, and regret what has happened to America over the years.
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:14 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,629 posts, read 28,732,432 times
Reputation: 25226
Canada is a nice country. But the U.S. is literally a GIANT compared to Canada. The U.S. has many times the number of cities, attractions and job opportunities and is much more dynamic. A single U.S. state has more people than all of Canada.

So, it's not possible to make an apples-apples comparison between the two. And I'm not sure what an "average person" is anyway. And another thing - about 90% of the Canadian population lives close to the border with the U.S. That should tell you something. ;-)

Last edited by BigCityDreamer; 12-06-2012 at 08:29 AM..
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Old 12-06-2012, 08:38 AM
 
183 posts, read 601,701 times
Reputation: 219
The US has serious socioeconomic problems. Even if you choose the right path that doesn't lead to a life of poverty and debt, you're going to be surrounded by people who are. It's gotten progressively worse for the past 30 years and there is no sign it is ever going to turn around. It could, but I think it'll take something more severe than the most recent economic crisis as there is no way the change is going to come from the corrupt government, no matter what people want. Though people often vote for tax cuts now because their wages haven't risen with the cost of living and the lack of quality jobs.

The income gap is reflected in all aspects of life. It's not simply the rich are making more, but now they have access to much better schools, schools that the middle class and poor aren't zoned for or can't afford. They live in the nicer parts of America's bigger cities (often both there and an affluent suburb), while the middle class and poor are pushed further outward.

Other than that, the US wins in terms of climate variety, natural resources, interesting cities, and so on. And if you choose the right career path, in the right city, at the right time (during the boom part of our boom and bust cycle), you'll make more in the US. Canada also shares some of the similar socioeconomic problems the US has, especially in Vancouver supposedly, just not as severe. So, it's really not easy to choose.

Last edited by ErikJohnsson; 12-06-2012 at 09:58 AM.. Reason: chose should have been choose
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