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Old 12-12-2012, 05:36 PM
 
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Er...according to many surveys, yes.
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Old 12-13-2012, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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I've never been to Europe. I know that religious observance in that continent is continuing to fall, especially among those from a Christian background. Trips to visit Europe's Catholic shrines are frequently advertised in the Catholic newspaper I read. Is it the case that most of the tourists to places like Lourdes and Fatima are not European, but are increasingly from Africa and Asia? Is it also the case that houses of worship in Europe are increasingly serving immigrants?
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Old 12-14-2012, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Earth Wanderer, longing for the stars.
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Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
Christianity is very strong in South Korea. It's popular with some of their national leaders, and many military, and business leaders. Some years ago I read that the Full Gospel Church of Seoul, had the Largest congregation of any single church in the World.

In the USA, for years I've seen churches with Korean signs, in suburban neighborhoods where I would swear no Koreans have ever lived (for instance, not a single Korean kid shown in any of the school yearbooks, nor any Lee's or Park's in the phone directory, and yet somehow there are Korean churches in the neighborhood???)

In the USA, you will not find a more devoutly Catholic group than Filipino's. Filipino Americans take their faith VERY VERY seriously, much more than any other group. They will do anything to send their teenagers to a Catholic high school, even it means commuting 3 hours a day across the city for 4 years.

Russian Orthodox churches still survive in remote parts of Alaska like Kodiak Island, and some of their members are Native Americans.

Israel has seen an influx of immigrants from Ethiopia who claim to be "Jews" - although their faith was sort of hidden away for centuries.
I saw a special on this. I think, initially it was thought that the religious practices of these black Jews were more authentic, more adhering to ancient traditions than those of modern Jews. This was because they were so isolated for so long. DNA tests were done on them and they are also found to be more genetically Jewish than most of the people who were dwelling in Israel at the time.
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by french user View Post
I agree, I think there are two ways when speaking about religion in various countries.
1- Speaking of the degree of actual religious personal practice or believe in religion.
2- Speaking of which religion mostly left its cultural background (historic religion)

One person coming from a culturally Islamic country, even if atheist or non-muslim will have a cultural "mind-format" different than someone from a culturally protestant country.

Western European countries are usually either of Protestant-rooted culture or catholic-rooted culture.
It seems that religious practice is relatively low in protestant-rooted countries; I don't think that it makes them anyless culturally protestant: Scandinavia, northern Germany, Netherlands, UK.

In the cuturally catholic countries ther are countries with high religiosity such as Ireland, Poland or Portugal; or countries with low-religiosity such as Czech republic or in a leasser extend France. And countries "with average religiosity" such as Spain (Spain is not anymore the ultra-catholic country it was during Franco).
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ief_in_god.svg
Fichier:Europe religion map fr.png - Wikipédia

It is interesting to see that countries with similar cultural roots such as Poland and Czech republic (both considered central European, Slavic and culturally/historically Catholic countries); usually limped into the same linguistic/cultural and geographic group can have such divergences concerning actual religiosity.

i always think of france as a bit of an anomaly when it comes to defining it from a culturally religous POV , i find it hard to class france as culturally catholic in any real sense at all and it could never be considered culturally protestant , france has created its own ethos and style
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Old 12-14-2012, 08:37 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
i always think of france as a bit of an anomaly when it comes to defining it from a culturally religous POV , i find it hard to class france as culturally catholic in any real sense at all and it could never be considered culturally protestant , france has created its own ethos and style
Urban Paris seems pretty secular/humanist, while the rural villages seem pretty religious/Catholic to me, especially the South.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:36 PM
 
Location: The Netherlands
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Urban Paris seems pretty secular/humanist, while the rural villages seem pretty religious/Catholic to me, especially the South.
Not just urban Paris, France in general is one of the most secular countries in the world. It has the highest number of people (33%) who positively say they "don't believe there is any sort of spirit, God or life force" out of all the countries in Europe. Only 34% of the population believe in God, which means 66% is atheist since atheism is merely the disbelief in gods. Source: http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/a..._report_en.pdf, p. 11.

This map shows the % of theists in most European countries (based on the Eurobarometer):

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Old 12-14-2012, 09:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LindavG View Post
Not just urban Paris, France in general is one of the most secular countries in the world. It has the highest number of people (33%) who positively say they "don't believe there is any sort of spirit, God or life force" out of all the countries in Europe. Only 34% of the population believe in God, which means 66% is atheist since atheism is merely the disbelief in gods. Source: http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/a..._report_en.pdf, p. 11.

This map shows the % of theists in most European countries (based on the Eurobarometer):
If people believe in a spirit or life force, then they can't be called atheist. Atheists don't believe in spirits. So 34% of the population is atheist.
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Old 12-14-2012, 09:58 PM
 
Location: The Netherlands
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Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
If people believe in a spirit or life force, then they can't be called atheist. Atheists don't believe in spirits. So 34% of the population is atheist.
You're wrong, atheists don't believe in god(s), that is the very definition of the word. Some atheists, such as Buddhists, do believe in a spirit or life force.

If you do not believe in any gods, you're an atheist. It doesn't matter what else you believe.
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Old 12-14-2012, 11:03 PM
 
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The Islamic southern Philippines has been mentioned in this thread. But it went further than that - at the time of Spanish colonization in the 1500's, the entire Philippine archipelago was a mix of Islamic "datus" and sultans alongside animists and a mix of southeast Asian Hinduism and Buddhism (sometimes called "Hindu-Buddhism"). The Manila area (on the northern island of Luzon) in the 1570's (when the Spaniards took over) was under the control of the "Rajah of Maynila," leader of a tribe that had been converted to Islam. There were Muslim colonies as far north as the Luzon strait, which separates the Philippines from Taiwan.

Islam also made it quite a ways east on the mainland of southeast Asia. One tribe that still exists today are known as the Cham. Of the 200,000 or so Cham in Cambodia, most are Sunni Muslims, while around 40% of Vietnam's 160,000 Cham are Muslim. They mainly live in southern Vietnam.

In the Americas, the country with the largest Muslim population as a proportion of the total is Suriname, which is 13.5% Muslim. Most of them are the descendents of laborers from the old British Raj (India/Pakistan/Bangladesh) and Indonesia back when Suriname was a Dutch colony. Guyana had a similar migration, though it is around 7% Muslim and almost 30% Hindu (Suriname is 20% Hindu). Trinidad is around 6.5% Muslim and 26% Hindu.

And going back to the Philippines, while most Christians there are Roman Catholics, one of the largest non-Catholic groups is the indigenous Iglesia Ni Cristo ("Church of Christ"), a denomination founded in 1914 when the Philippines were still a US colony. It has grown over time to around 6-8% of the Philippine population, including a small number of non-Filipino overseas converts. California probably has the largest number of non-ethnic Filipino Iglesia members in the world.
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Old 12-15-2012, 08:55 AM
 
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Originally Posted by LindavG View Post
Not just urban Paris, France in general is one of the most secular countries in the world. It has the highest number of people (33%) who positively say they "don't believe there is any sort of spirit, God or life force" out of all the countries in Europe. Only 34% of the population believe in God, which means 66% is atheist since atheism is merely the disbelief in gods. Source: http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/a..._report_en.pdf, p. 11.

This map shows the % of theists in most European countries (based on the Eurobarometer):

not really what i was getting at , the number of people who claim not to believe in god in denmark or sweeden is also high yet i still view those countries as being culturally lutheran , i dont see france as culturally catholic despite most french people being nominally catholic , its not comparable to italy , spain or even ireland
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