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View Poll Results: You top pick? (multiple choice this time-- for those that like a few of the places)
New York 63 29.17%
London 55 25.46%
Hong Kong 38 17.59%
Tokyo 31 14.35%
Paris 29 13.43%
Voters: 216. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-18-2019, 10:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
No, it's not. I just dropped the Google guy and that's what I got.
But he does have a point, that that random area with single family homes is probably not Manhattan, probably in the farther reaches of Brooklyn/Staten Island/Queens, whereas that green area of Tokyo was Shinjuku, the heart of Tokyo.

I wish so bad that Singapore was on this poll. I vote Tokyo, but if Singapore was on this poll it would win hands down, in many ways, not least of which is their incredible, incredibly manicured landscaping. Seriously, the freeways are all lined with tropical vegetation, almost like you're driving into Disneyworld.
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Old 04-19-2019, 03:55 AM
 
Location: Greater Orlampa CSA
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https://goo.gl/maps/tU8BFTGnvBN3Fo1v9

^ What he said lol.

But yeah here’s a visual of UES. It’s interesting to note how much wider streets are in NYC than in Tokyo. Even in America’s densest city, things are still much, MUCH more built around the automobile.
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Old 04-19-2019, 04:03 AM
 
Location: Greater Orlampa CSA
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https://goo.gl/maps/GTca5xqcXgjXLWta6

Here’s the general area where we stayed when in Tokyo, a little less than 10 min walk from Shibuya Square.

https://goo.gl/maps/naf6Fhy6B9R7rduy6

Random view in a slightly less central neighborhood of Tokyo.

That said... I don’t know of anywhere in Tokyo where I saw single family detached housing like that. It’s just more structurally dense in general by a wide margin IMO. NYC has population density esp. in certain Manhattan spots, but I think that is primarily a result of its verticality.

In any sense, based on my experience, Tokyo still has many QOL factors on NYC and others in this group. I’d agree Singapore is likely similarly outstanding in this regard.
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Old 04-19-2019, 09:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
https://goo.gl/maps/tU8BFTGnvBN3Fo1v9

^ What he said lol.

But yeah here’s a visual of UES. It’s interesting to note how much wider streets are in NYC than in Tokyo. Even in America’s densest city, things are still much, MUCH more built around the automobile.
Actually, streets in Seoul are incredibly wide, even wider than those in NYC. Does that make Seoul more car centric than Tokyo? No. Neither does that make NYC more car centric than Tokyo.

Manhattan has a higher population density than any of Tokyo's 23 wards.

Last edited by MrJester; 04-19-2019 at 10:24 AM..
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Old 04-19-2019, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Greater Orlampa CSA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
Actually, streets in Seoul are incredibly wide, even wider than those in NYC. Does that make Seoul more car centric than Tokyo? No. Neither does that make NYC more car centric than Tokyo.

Manhattan has a higher population density than any of Tokyo's 23 wards.
I would agree that using street width to measure how car centric a place is can be an oversimplification, though I do think that is a factor to be considered. I wouldn't necessarily say that NYC isn't walkable or car centric-it is extremely so, and less car centric than any other American city by a wide margin IMO. Still though, half of all NYC residents do own a vehicle, compared to 23.21 registered vehicles per 100 in Tokyo. I'm not positive on how number of taxis on road would influence things, either. I haven't been to Seoul, so I'm not sure how it would compare. But the primary difference in Tokyo is that there isn't one primary center, things are spread about and so every bit of life is basically offered in most of the 23 wards, but on a small scale, with a little heartbeat, and things thinning out from there, as opposed to NYC which has a long, essentially continuous center. My wife's favorite part of Tokyo which was her favorite major city she's been to in the world to this point was how human scaled it was, compared to the others she had been to. I'm not quite sure how Seoul would compare to the others, but I think that while certain factors (density, structurally/population wise, street width, etc.) can influence how car centric or walkable a place is, ultimately those differences have to be felt, and often different people can come to different conclusions still.
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Old 04-19-2019, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Cannes
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NYC
London
Tokyo
Paris
HK
I am one of the few people i know that is not crazy about HK...I felt suffocated there, i prefere Seoul, Singapore.
Seoul is probably my favorite Asian city. The wow factor of NYC is just too hard to beat. Been there many times and everytime i go back i have the same" goddammit" what a monster of a city feeling
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Old 04-19-2019, 10:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavsfan137 View Post
I would agree that using street width to measure how car centric a place is can be an oversimplification, though I do think that is a factor to be considered. I wouldn't necessarily say that NYC isn't walkable or car centric-it is extremely so, and less car centric than any other American city by a wide margin IMO. Still though, half of all NYC residents do own a vehicle, compared to 23.21 registered vehicles per 100 in Tokyo. I'm not positive on how number of taxis on road would influence things, either. I haven't been to Seoul, so I'm not sure how it would compare. But the primary difference in Tokyo is that there isn't one primary center, things are spread about and so every bit of life is basically offered in most of the 23 wards, but on a small scale, with a little heartbeat, and things thinning out from there, as opposed to NYC which has a long, essentially continuous center. My wife's favorite part of Tokyo which was her favorite major city she's been to in the world to this point was how human scaled it was, compared to the others she had been to. I'm not quite sure how Seoul would compare to the others, but I think that while certain factors (density, structurally/population wise, street width, etc.) can influence how car centric or walkable a place is, ultimately those differences have to be felt, and often different people can come to different conclusions still.
I would say cities in Europe, including Paris, are even more human scaled than Tokyo. Ditto for Vienna and Munich. Vienna and Munich actually have, I believe, higher car ownership rates than NYC, but they just seem more human scaled. Paris, Munich and Vienna are all big cities with the heart of a small town.

I think we need to make a difference between high public transportation usage and pedestrian friendliness. The two are typically correlated, but there are major exceptions.

Beijing has the world's busiest subway, but its streets are very wide (kind of like Seoul), and the streets are filled with reckless drivers that would make any NYC cab driver tame by comparison. Blocks tend to be very long, and it's filled with concrete commie blocks and epic smog. So yes, everyone takes the subway, but no, it's definitely not pedestrian friendly.

By contrast, you have Vienna and Munich, where a lot of people own cars, but only to get from city to city, to rural areas. To get to the city center they take the S-Bahn and once there they can soak up all the historic attractions within a two mile radius of Downtown, just walking on cobblestone, pedestrian-only streets. The excellent air quality and fascinating architecture beckon pedestrians to go outside. To some extent this is also true of Tokyo.
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Old 04-21-2019, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Greater Orlampa CSA
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I'd say human scale can be defined in different ways. I get what you are saying, the pedestrian park, older building, etc nature, there's no replicating that, and some of those places you mention really do have the feel of a small town.

That said though, Tokyo is SO advanced. There seems to be an obsessive preoccupation there with making little elements of life a little simpler, or better, what have you. In terms of the digital, but also in many cases how and where certain things are placed. It truly does allow you to live your whole life within a 15 minute radius there, and things just sort of... flow. Even the vending machines are more advanced. I could wax poetic about it, but it's just something that has to be experienced. A city that could combined elements of a Tokyo and a Vienna would certainly be most advanced/walkable in world, but IDK if that is even possible.

I'd argue that Beijing, in spite of it's weaknesses (crazy drivers, long blocks in places, and smog) is still very pedestrian friendly compared to many cities in the world. It, like Tokyo, has a sense where, because things are built so tightly together, intelligence in design has made it so that everything one would need is available in a thin radius. We stayed near a mall about 3 miles east of the center, and for one thing, the Metro was extremely well set up with multiple exit and entry points for various pedestrians to go in and out at different sides without hitting traffic. In addition, the mall that was on the block surrounding us really served as a "downtown" of sorts, for that specific block/neighborhood. You really got a feel of community and that even though it was sterile/brutalistic in building type, the general atmosphere within and around it was not that at all. With tight space too, things had to be creative. Places that otherwise would have just been sidewalk and I'm assuming sewage run off was turned into a beautiful park with nice landscaping and even a man made waterfall, that went on for well over a mile. Of course, the center of Beijing with it's world class, massive parks and numerous leafy streets and narrow pedestrian alleys extending off from them.. to me it was impressive still. You also, even as an unfamiliar tourist, can walk around at 11 at night even without any particular concern of safety.. not too many cities where one can say that.
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Old 04-24-2019, 02:52 PM
 
Location: New York City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Aw c'mon. Philadelphia is Center City surrounded by an enormous slum. Even in Center City, you're constantly faced with the squalor of homeless people, druggies, and street bums.
I am not sure how or why Philadelphia was brought up... but your comment is hardly accurate.

Center City is among the best and most developed downtowns in the nation and its overall very safe, most crime and violent crime in Philadelphia is very isolated to bad neighborhoods outside of Center City, just like Chicago and DC.

Next, I don't know when the last time you were in Philadelphia, but Center City is not surrounded by slums. To East is the Delaware River (riverfront), no slums

West is University City which extends very far West, you don't enter the badlands anywhere close to Center City.

South is largely residential neighborhoods (many of which are hip and trendy), does not get bad until Point Breeze and further.

North is largely buffered by Fairmount and Northern Liberties / Fishtown. There are plenty of bad areas in North Philadelphia, but they are get further and further away from Center City each year. Not to mention several other wonderful neighborhoods on the other side of the city like Chestnut Hill, probably one of the most beautiful urban / suburban neighborhoods in the country.

It seems you don't like Philadelphia, which is fine, but know your facts and don't spread falsehoods for the heck of it...

Now related to this thread, its New York and London.
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Old 08-18-2019, 05:28 PM
 
Location: plano
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Been to all multiple times. Lived in NYC metro.

Paris is last. Superficial and not a city that works.
NYC is next worst. Just big and unappealing to me.
HK is next. Pretty but stuck in China
London is high on my list. Just not as diverse as I like.
Tokyo is tops. Like the people and despite being low diversity feels very different from the others.

I like Singapore more than the five ranked. Clmate is not good but love everything else.
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