Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-09-2022, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
183 posts, read 122,024 times
Reputation: 449

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by norcal2k19 View Post
>> I think when Canadians think of "social diversity" I think that they have a tendency to frame this question beyond racial categories, another contrast with the U.S. Diversity can mean gender expression, sexual orientation, spiritual or other creed, social-economic classes, etc

Many Americans think this too and it's still more diverse than Canada in social categories beyond race in an order of magnitude. Even if we just used California as an example, it is more diverse, innovative, and wealthier than Canada.

Fortunately it's easy to find demographic info, for California rural areas: https://ucanr.edu/sites/UC_CCP/files/125967.pdf

- 94% of the population live in urban areas, while just 6% of the population (1.8 million) live in rural areas
- Ethnically homogenous. 82% of the population is white, compared to 47% in urban areas. Latinos comprise the next highest group (9%), followed by American Indians (3%).
- 91% speak English at home (compared to 61%).
- Higher percent graduate from high school (84%) compared to state (77%), but fewer complete
college (17% compared to 27%).
- Fewer residents are in labor force (53% compared to 62%), but unemployment rates are about the
same as the state average (4.7% compared to 4.3%).
- A higher percentage are employed in the service occupations, construction and farming than for the
state as a whole.

And I got income from here: https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/states/california
- rural per capita income at $52,022

In Ontario:
https://www.ruralontarioinstitute.ca...IBLE_FINAL.pdf

- 14.9% live in rural areas
- After-tax median family income in rural areas of Ontario ($71,780) is over $10,000 per year lower than in metro areas ($82,914) and more than $7,000 lower than in partially non- metro areas ($78,916)
- 7.1% in rural areas have a language other than English as their first language
- Rural areas have the lowest percentage of visible minorities (2.7%) than any other area of the province and is well below the percentage in Ontario overall (29.3%).
- Rural areas of Ontario have the highest percentage of people with Indigenous origins (9.3%), which is almost two and half times higher than for the province overall (3.9%).
- Comparatively few residents of rural areas have a university degree (14.9%), which
is not even half the provincial-wide rate (31.9%).
- However, more residents of rural areas have followed a different path for post-secondary education – almost 1 in 10 (9.6%) residents 25 to 64 years of age in rural areas have obtained an apprenticeship or trades certificate, which is more than twice as high as the percentage in metro areas (4.7%).
- Rural areas of Ontario have the lowest employment rate in the province (55.3%), which is almost 5% lower than partially non-metro (60.1%) and metro areas (61.0%). But it's not clear to me if that figure includes only people seeking work, apart from retirees, etc.

So rural Ontario is a larger proportion of the population versus California - and the rural areas are also way more white than I expected, and way more white than rural California. There are more people with Indigenous ancestry as a proportion.

Rural Ontario's unemployment rate appears lower; more rural Ontarians work in trades. Rural Ontarians are much more likely to have finished university.

California has a per capita rural income that is probably about the same as the entire family income for rural Ontario, when you work out the dollar exchange rate, and so rural Californians appear to have the higher incomes.

Rural Ontario at least is not very racially diverse at all. Education and career wise, maybe at least as diverse as rural California. More rich people in rural California.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-27-2022, 09:39 PM
 
98 posts, read 37,278 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by fikatid View Post
Hi all!

Although I have been lurking around these forums for quite some time now I haev just decided to sign up and join the conversations I am quite a number geek, and have keen interest in a number of topics that are often discussed here. Geography, culture, cities, architecture... etc.

Anyway I thought I'd share my thought on one of the topics that I have always been interested in, the diveresity in "traditional immigrant countries" such as the United States, Canada and Australia and are there any differences between immigrantion and cultural history. Do they have specific ties to certain European countries that generate greater interests? Questions like these have driven me to do some simple research of my own. I have put together statistics from US Census Bureau, Statistics Canada and Australian Bureau of Statistics trying to compile their data on reported ancestry/ethnicity.

In Australia for example, Malta and Macedonia are the only two European countries that sent more immigrants to the country than either USA and Canada, based on their 2006 census statistics. Australia also has sizable Serbians, Greek, Crotian, and English relative to its overall population (in that order). People from the British Isles still dominates the overall European population in Australia, with Italians, Germans being the next major ancestry groups.

In Canada, the only two countries that sent more immigrants to the country are Iceland and Ukraine. Scotland, Estonia and France is not far behind. The country has sizable Belgium, Romanian, Autraian, Dutch, Finnish, Swiss, Danish communities relative to its overall population. People of French and British/Irish ancestries comprises the majority of the population, but we start to see sizable communities of people of Dutch, German, Scandinavian and Ukrainian ancestry.

The majority of the Europe emigrants, of course, choose the United States. With the exception of the formentioned Malta, Macedonia, Iceland and Ukraine, the country has recieved the majority share of the emigrants from other European countries. People of German, British, Irish origin comprises made up the majority of the population. But it also has sizable Scandinavian, Italian, Polish, Spanish and French comunities.

I am still in the process of putting these numbers together and trying to see what they really mean lol. But it is interesting for me to see how the similiarities and differences between these three countries, in terms of where all those European emigrants went and settled in the last few centuries. I am also interested in looking at people from other backgrounds but that will take a while.

I just thought I'd share these information with you guys. I am not sure if there's any real interests in these topics, but I can try and upload some statistics and data in later posts if anyone is interested in finding out more
Forgot that this was the original focus of the sub - so does this make the USA way more diverse than the other 2? I'm thinking so
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2022, 04:11 AM
 
5,743 posts, read 3,598,707 times
Reputation: 8905
What is Diversity and how is it measured?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2022, 07:35 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
27,560 posts, read 28,652,113 times
Reputation: 25153
Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
What is Diversity and how is it measured?
Skin color or pigmentation, in the modern context.

The “other” stuff doesn’t count. You have to read between the lines to get it.

In one word, diverse = black.

That is the holy grail, the unspoken truth that everybody knows but nobody wants to say out loud.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2022, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,028,112 times
Reputation: 34871
Quote:
In one word, diverse = black.

That is the holy grail, the unspoken truth that everybody knows but nobody wants to say out loud.
Maybe that's what it means to you. But I think perhaps it's only in the USA where some people may think that diversity = black. In other countries diversity means many, many things.

.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2022, 07:59 PM
 
383 posts, read 181,238 times
Reputation: 464
The US is a microcosm of the world. We're regularly derided for having "no culture" of our own. From the beginning, several European nations claimed parts, and in some ways, the settling reminds me a bit of how various tribes from continental Europe did the same for the British Isles immediately after the fall of Rome... Canada and Australia have stronger associations with the UK. More French influence for Canada, although both have large numbers from India, China, Philippines (so does the US). For some reason, Australia seems popular with South Americans and Mediterranean folk. They both support smaller populations, have strict immigration policies, and attract former colonies of the UK. I think they're slowly becoming more US-like
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2022, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
5,058 posts, read 7,499,121 times
Reputation: 4531
Quote:
Originally Posted by perennial millennial View Post
The US is a microcosm of the world. We're regularly derided for having "no culture" of our own. From the beginning, several European nations claimed parts, and in some ways, the settling reminds me a bit of how various tribes from continental Europe did the same for the British Isles immediately after the fall of Rome... Canada and Australia have stronger associations with the UK. More French influence for Canada, although both have large numbers from India, China, Philippines (so does the US). For some reason, Australia seems popular with South Americans and Mediterranean folk. They both support smaller populations, have strict immigration policies, and attract former colonies of the UK. I think they're slowly becoming more US-like
Most of Australia's Mediterranean people came here at the end of WW2 when the US had pretty strict policies designed to either keep them out, or to severely restrict their numbers,

While still small in number Australia does have a growing Latino population, who are indeed mostly South Americans, particularly from Brazil, Columbia and Chile, no idea why.

It also should be pointed out there is no favor shown to commonwealth Countries in Australia's immigration policies. The thing that helps these people the most is they are more likely to have a good grasp of the English language, which helps them settle and get jobs etc. I suppose that Australia is in the commonwealth might also give it a bit more name recognition in those countries, than it might get else where.

Australia also a freedom of movement agreement with New Zealand, basically any Australian without a criminal record can go and live permanently in New Zealand without a visa, and vice versa.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 10-01-2022 at 12:05 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2022, 01:51 AM
 
Location: Australia
3,602 posts, read 2,306,628 times
Reputation: 6932
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Most of Australia's Mediterranean people came here at the end of WW2 when the US had pretty strict policies designed to either keep them out, or to severely restrict their numbers,

While still small in number Australia does have a growing Latino population, who are indeed mostly South Americans, particularly from Brazil, Columbia and Chile, no idea why.

It also should be pointed out there is no favor shown to commonwealth Countries in Australia's immigration policies. The thing that helps these people the most is they are more likely to have a good grasp of the English language, which helps them settle and get jobs etc. I suppose that Australia is in the commonwealth might also give it a bit more name recognition in those countries, than it might get else where.

Australia also a freedom of movement agreement with New Zealand, basically any Australian without a criminal record can go and live permanently in New Zealand without a visa, and vice versa.
They told us in Italy that people who could not gain entry to the US would come to Australia instead. Where there was a need for manual, uneducated workers at the time. My FIL cut cane in Nth Queensland for years.
Yes, we had a Brazilian tour guide when we went to Sth America. She was of German heritage, spoke about four languages fluently and lived in Western Sydney. But the numbers of Sth Americans are still small.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2022, 11:15 PM
 
5,743 posts, read 3,598,707 times
Reputation: 8905
Quote:
Originally Posted by perennial millennial View Post
The US is a microcosm of the world. We're regularly derided for having "no culture" of our own. From the beginning, several European nations claimed parts, and in some ways, the settling reminds me a bit of how various tribes from continental Europe did the same for the British Isles immediately after the fall of Rome... Canada and Australia have stronger associations with the UK. More French influence for Canada, although both have large numbers from India, China, Philippines (so does the US). For some reason, Australia seems popular with South Americans and Mediterranean folk. They both support smaller populations, have strict immigration policies, and attract former colonies of the UK. I think they're slowly becoming more US-like

That is absolutely wrong. US/Can/Aus were colonized by "settlers" into vast unpopulated spaces, mainly by the British, but other Caucasians were widely admitted, essentially into a European annex. No European nation accrued its population by bringing outsiders in to fill the spaces. The US is not, in any way, analogous to that model. . The historical formation ox European lands is exactly the diametric opposite of the manner in which the US formed. Stop forcing the world into doing everything the American way -- the shoe doesn't fit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2022, 11:23 PM
 
383 posts, read 181,238 times
Reputation: 464
Quote:
Originally Posted by arr430 View Post
That is absolutely wrong. US/Can/Aus were colonized by "settlers" into vast unpopulated spaces, mainly by the British, but other Caucasians were widely admitted, essentially into a European annex. No European nation accrued its population by bringing outsiders in to fill the spaces. The US is not, in any way, analogous to that model. . The historical formation ox European lands is exactly the diametric opposite of the manner in which the US formed. Stop forcing the world into doing everything the American way -- the shoe doesn't fit.

So was just about every other country. There are countless examples of Europeans "colonizing" other parts of Europe going back before written records.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:18 PM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top