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Old 05-19-2013, 10:26 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,682 posts, read 52,735,440 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Yea, but software jobs can only employ a small fraction of a country's population, especially one as big as India. They're not going to propel India to a much higher income bracket, just expand the middle class somewhat.
Exactly, they hardly represent India or all Indians. For a start India has a long way to approach China's 50% urban population.
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Old 05-20-2013, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 6,833,962 times
Reputation: 1690
First World Definition | Investopedia
This is the definition of a first world country. As you can see fat people have nothing to do with it.
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Old 05-20-2013, 04:22 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,870 posts, read 20,269,409 times
Reputation: 9242
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex =] View Post
From your own source:

"In the United States, the average person earns 37 708 USD a year, more than the OECD average of 22 387 USD a year. But there is a considerable gap between the richest and poorest – [b]the top 20% of the population earn approximately eight times as much as the bottom 20%."

" In the United States, the income of the top 20% of the population is 81 878 USD a year, whereas the bottom 20% live on 10591 USD a year."
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20% of the U.S. population have third world annual salaries.
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"People in the United States work 1778 hours a year, more than most people in the OECD who work 1749 hours. Almost 11% of employees work very long hours, higher than the OECD average of 9%, with 15% of men working very long hours compared with just 6% for women."

"The wages and other monetary benefits that come with employment are an important aspect of job quality. In the United States, people earn 52 607 US dollars per year on average, much higher than the OECD average 34 033 US dollars. Not everyone earns that amount however. Whereas the top 20% of the population earn 109 508 US dollars per year, the bottom 20% live on 16 682 per year.
Another essential factor of employment quality is job security. Employees working on temporary contracts are more vulnerable than workers with an open-ended contract. In the United States, close to 11% of total employees have a contract of 6 months or less, slightly higher than the OECD-30 average of 10%. This figure suggests greater stabilisation of working contracts could be encouraged for US employees."

"The United States spent 7,538 USD on health per person in 2008, two-and-a-half times greater than the OECD average of 3,060 USD. Americans spent more than twice as much as relatively rich European countries such as France, Germany and the United Kingdom. The United States spends much more on health than any other OECD country on a per capita basis and as a share of GDP."

"Soaring obesity rates make the US the fattest country in the OECD. Overweight and obesity rates have increased steadily since the 1980s in both men and women. In the United States, the obesity rate among adults is of 33.8%. This is the highest rate among the 21 OECD countries with self-reported data, with an average of 14.9% in 2008. Three out of four people are projected by the OECD to be overweight or obese within 10 years. 40% of American children are currently overweight. Of these, half are obese — the highest rate in the OECD."

"the United States’ homicide rate is 5.0, higher than the OECD average of 2.1 and one of the highest in the OECD."


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The U.S. is second world, overall.

You should live in Europe or Canada a few years so that you experience a first world life.
Lol oooooooooookay, your nitpicking statistics are very convincing.

and please explain to me what is "first world life"
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Old 05-20-2013, 04:55 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 82,675,513 times
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It's quite easy. You define First World and Third World, which doesn't really leave much of a dispute, and Second World is what you have left over. There are very few countries that are actually on the cusp of First or Third World, which cannot be usefully nit-picked. Borderline countries often exhibit characteristics that put them in the first world in some aspects of their global presence, and not in others. All but about a half dozen countries are now fundamentally democratic, with an electorate that has some measure of governing influence, so you can't really use that yardstick anymore., except to create a Fourth World if you are so inclined.

The per capita GDP is generally in the $10-25K range in the Second World, which is anything below Portugal. Greece and Czech Republic, down to about Tunisia and Colombia. Below that, it's Third World. There are only about a dozen countries with PPP between $6-10K, so that is a pretty sharp dividing line. The line between First World and Second World is harder to place statistically, but generally, the First World are the well-established and industrialized free-market countries that export technical finished goods and import commodities and labor.

The USA ranks about 8th of some 35 countries in the First World.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...%29_per_capita

There are several variations on that metric, but most sift out to pretty much the same list.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-20-2013 at 05:19 PM..
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Old 05-20-2013, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,550 posts, read 14,777,156 times
Reputation: 5141
You could put all these countries in the 2nd World category...

Mexico, Belize, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Barbados, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Mauritius, Maldives, Tunisia, Bosnia, Serbia, Montenegro, Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova, Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkey, Lebanon, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Iran, China, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Brunei, Philippines, Palau, Fiji.
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Old 05-20-2013, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,556,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
You could put all these countries in the 2nd World category...

Mexico, Belize, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Barbados, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, Brazil, South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Mauritius, Maldives, Tunisia, Bosnia, Serbia, Montenegro, Albania, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova, Ukraine, Belarus, Russia, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Turkey, Lebanon, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman, Iran, China, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Brunei, Philippines, Palau, Fiji.
United Arab Emirates and Qatar are very rich indeed.
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Old 05-20-2013, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,550 posts, read 14,777,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
United Arab Emirates and Qatar are very rich indeed.
Rich doesn't make you a first world country.
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Old 05-20-2013, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,556,235 times
Reputation: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Rich doesn't make you a first world country.
It doesn't make sense to put super rich countries like UAE and poor countries like China and Vietnam in the same category.
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Old 05-20-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,550 posts, read 14,777,156 times
Reputation: 5141
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
It doesn't make sense to put super rich countries like UAE and poor countries like China and Vietnam in the same category.
It doesn't make sense to put strict islamic countries like UAE and tolerant countries like the Netherlands and Sweden in the same category.
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Old 05-20-2013, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Chicago(Northside)
3,719 posts, read 6,833,962 times
Reputation: 1690
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
It's quite easy. You define First World and Third World, which doesn't really leave much of a dispute, and Second World is what you have left over. There are very few countries that are actually on the cusp of First or Third World, which cannot be usefully nit-picked. Borderline countries often exhibit characteristics that put them in the first world in some aspects of their global presence, and not in others. All but about a half dozen countries are now fundamentally democratic, with an electorate that has some measure of governing influence, so you can't really use that yardstick anymore., except to create a Fourth World if you are so inclined.

The per capita GDP is generally in the $10-25K range in the Second World, which is anything below Portugal. Greece and Czech Republic, down to about Tunisia and Colombia. Below that, it's Third World. There are only about a dozen countries with PPP between $6-10K, so that is a pretty sharp dividing line. The line between First World and Second World is harder to place statistically, but generally, the First World are the well-established and industrialized free-market countries that export technical finished goods and import commodities and labor.

The USA ranks about 8th of some 35 countries in the First World.

List of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There are several variations on that metric, but most sift out to pretty much the same list.
Tell that to Alex41....
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