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Old 05-21-2013, 12:58 AM
 
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I'm originally from India and I gotta admit that China is leagues ahead of India when it comes to development and infrastructure. Maybe, just maybe India will approach their current level in 50 years, but by that time China would be another 50 years ahead. I'd say China is somewhere between India and Japan when it comes to infrastructure.
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Old 07-07-2013, 03:37 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,318,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP's question:

Densest cities in a first world country

(In case people missed it the first time.)
We read this the first time round, thanks.

I would now count India as a first world country, based upon a savings rate of 38% of GDP, strong market fundamentals, gold imports (a key factor often overlooked in mainstream analyses), HDI considerations, political stability and military expenditure.

The counters to this are wealth disparity (which is increasingly a feature of traditional first world countries, so not as much of a criticism as it was in the past), and an as yet embryonic banking system.
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Old 07-07-2013, 03:44 AM
 
Location: In the heights
34,520 posts, read 33,748,467 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
We read this the first time round, thanks.

I would now count India as a first world country, based upon a savings rate of 38% of GDP, strong market fundamentals, gold imports (a key factor often overlooked in mainstream analyses), HDI considerations, political stability and military expenditure.

The counters to this are wealth disparity (which is increasingly a feature of traditional first world countries, so not as much of a criticism as it was in the past), and an as yet embryonic banking system.
Perhaps you should try visiting India before you state this. The slums are incredible.
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
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Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Perhaps you should try visiting India before you state this. The slums are incredible.
I agree wealth disparity is a big concern (as is the literacy rate), but it is simply not as much of a substantive criticism as it used to be, given current global trends.

By this I'm referring to negative socioeconomic trends in long-standing first world populations, compared to the sheer pace of urbanisation in India, the rise of innovative entrepreneurship, demographic changes, extensive trade networks and foreign investment portfolios, a steady PMI and booming industry - all features of only the most highly sophisticated "first world" nations today.

This is not to mention the recent history of extensive squalor in pinnacles of the first world such as New York City, or the currently observable trend in Detroit, Michigan.

Last edited by MissionIMPOSSIBRU; 07-07-2013 at 05:44 AM..
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:32 AM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,560,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
We read this the first time round, thanks.

I would now count India as a first world country, based upon a savings rate of 38% of GDP, strong market fundamentals, gold imports (a key factor often overlooked in mainstream analyses), HDI considerations, political stability and military expenditure.

The counters to this are wealth disparity (which is increasingly a feature of traditional first world countries, so not as much of a criticism as it was in the past), and an as yet embryonic banking system.
I promise you even Indians don't believe they are the first world.
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:34 AM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,560,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
I agree wealth disparity is a big concern, but it is simply not as much of a substantive criticism as it used to be, given current global trends: ie. negative socioeconomic trends in long-standing first world nations, and the sheer pace of urbanisation in India.

If it's the simple existence of slums, per se, then it's easily countered by appealing to the history of New York City, much of which resembled an uninhabitable wasteland in the late 1960s and 1970s. Moreover, a trend that is currently being revisited de novo in Detroit Michigan.
If India is a first world country, then there's practically no third world country left in the world.
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Old 07-07-2013, 04:55 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,318,354 times
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Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
If India is a first world country, then there's practically no third world country left in the world.
I'm afraid such views mainly rely upon long-held preconceptions of India that simply don't resemble the ostensible socioeconomic trends in the country and the macro data. This is somewhat similar to the now defunct arguments that China would never be a global economic power to rival the dominance of the USA.

There are arguments either way and numerous factors to consider aside from wealth distribution. If, as you claim, India is so obviously a part of the third world, then questions such as the following would be arbitrary and pointless:

India: A global economic power? | The World Financial Review
Forbes India Magazine - Is India Part of the First World?
First world India shouldn't need third world aid | Mail Online
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,560,716 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
I'm afraid such views mainly rely upon long-held preconceptions of India that simply don't resemble the ostensible socioeconomic trends in the country and the macro data. This is somewhat similar to the now defunct arguments that China would never ever be a global economic power.

There are arguments either way. If India was so obviously a part of the third world, as you confidently claim, then questions such as the following would be arbitrary and pointless:

India: A global economic power? | The World Financial Review
Forbes India Magazine - Is India Part of the First World?
First world India shouldn't need third world aid | Mail Online
Being a major global power and a first world country are not the same. A super large country has a large potential to become an influential country in the world, no matter how low the quality of life their citizens have.

The general census is that Nordic countries are highly developed and their citizens have some of the best quality of life. But none of the Nordic countries has the possibility to become a global power in any sense.

Is China a global economic power? It is! What would happen if 1 billion cheap labor Chinese stopped working suddenly? It's no doubt that this would have a major impact on world economy!

First world countries are characterized with higher standard of living, not necessarily the status of being global power.

Indians are doing whatever they can to immigrate to developed world, many Indians I know have complained about their misfortune of being born in a third world country.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:29 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,318,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
Being a major global power and a first world country are not the same. A super large country has a large potential to become an influential country in the world, no matter how low the quality of life their citizens have.

The general census is that Nordic countries are highly developed and their citizens have some of the best quality of life. But none of the Nordic countries has the possibility to become a global power in any sense.

Is China a global economic power? It is! What would happen if 1 billion cheap labor Chinese stopped working suddenly? It's no doubt that this would have a major impact on world economy!

First world countries are characterized with higher standard of living, not necessarily the status of being global power.

Indians are doing whatever they can to immigrate to developed world, many Indians I know have complained about their misfortune of being born in a third world country.
This is basically an argument that hinges upon a restrictive semantics of "first world" that identifies it only with HDI. This is evidently weak, given that popular-level and specialty references consistently refer to much broader post-cold war definitions.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,560,716 times
Reputation: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
This is basically an argument that hinges upon a restrictive semantics of "first world" that identifies it only with HDI. This is evidently weak, given that popular-level and specialty references consistently refer to much broader post-cold war definitions.
Okay, are you willing to move to India or China?
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