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Old 07-07-2013, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,721 posts, read 6,754,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
Okay, are you willing to move to India or China?
I think the better question would be if the poster is prepared to live like your average Indian who earns $1250 a year.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:51 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,319,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
Okay, are you willing to move to India or China?
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
I think the better question would be if the poster is prepared to live like your average Indian who earns $1250 a year.
These are clearly both fallacious arguments given that there is no formal entailment from "X is a first world country" to "It would be desirable for one to live in X"; the non-sequitur fallacy.

If I had no family/social commitments in this country, buying real estate in China and living in an ascendant asian megacity is far from unthinkable, as far as I'm concerned. I did list Shanghai as my second favourite city after London after all.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:53 AM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,562,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
I think the better question would be if the poster is prepared to live like your average Indian who earns $1250 a year.
"This discrepancy has large implications; for instance, when converted via the nominal exchange rates GDP per capita in India is about US$1,704[7] while on a PPP basis it is about US$3,608.[8] At the other extreme, Denmark's nominal GDP per capita is around US$62,100, but its PPP figure is US$37,304."
Purchasing power parity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Even $3,608 is scary enough.
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Texas
843 posts, read 1,562,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
If I had no family/social commitments in this country, buying real estate in China and living in an ascendant asian megacity is far from unthinkable, as far as I'm concerned. I did list Shanghai as my second favourite city after London after all.
Do you know how much it costs to buy a property in Shanghai?
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Old 07-07-2013, 05:58 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,319,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
Do you know how much it costs to buy a property in Shanghai?
Nothing close to some of the property prices in London. Shanghai's property market is volatile but a big gainer, so diversifying into this market might be a good thing in the long term.
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Old 07-07-2013, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,721 posts, read 6,754,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ag77845 View Post
"This discrepancy has large implications; for instance, when converted via the nominal exchange rates GDP per capita in India is about US$1,704[7] while on a PPP basis it is about US$3,608.[8] At the other extreme, Denmark's nominal GDP per capita is around US$62,100, but its PPP figure is US$37,304."
Purchasing power parity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Even $3,608 is scary enough.
Which puts it in the bottom third of all these lists, and 15 times less per person than the USA.

List of countries by GDP (PPP) per capita - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I will agree with one thing however, india with 1 billon people will grow into a global super power one day, but it's not there yet.
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Old 07-08-2013, 11:31 AM
 
Location: In the heights
34,605 posts, read 33,891,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
I agree wealth disparity is a big concern (as is the literacy rate), but it is simply not as much of a substantive criticism as it used to be, given current global trends.

By this I'm referring to negative socioeconomic trends in long-standing first world populations, compared to the sheer pace of urbanisation in India, the rise of innovative entrepreneurship, demographic changes, extensive trade networks and foreign investment portfolios, a steady PMI and booming industry - all features of only the most highly sophisticated "first world" nations today.

This is not to mention the recent history of extensive squalor in pinnacles of the first world such as New York City, or the currently observable trend in Detroit, Michigan.
I can't see this as a particularly useful response. Yes, India is going through incredible growth and change right now and there are facets of it which are very sophisticated. However, when that's put up with the proportion of the population who are living in poverty and when you're looking at metrics such as literacy rate, infant mortality rate, GDP per capita, percent malnourished, etc., you are then looking at metrics where the overall picture is quite different from countries generally considered developed.

NYC actually has fairly little squalor especially for a megacity. There are a certain number of people living in poverty, but the poverty line in the US is actually pretty high.

Last edited by Rozenn; 07-08-2013 at 12:28 PM.. Reason: Orphaned, off topic
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Old 07-08-2013, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,319,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I can't see this as a particularly useful response. Yes, India is going through incredible growth and change right now and there are facets of it which are very sophisticated. However, when that's put up with the proportion of the population who are living in poverty and when you're looking at metrics such as literacy rate, infant mortality rate, GDP per capita, percent malnourished, etc., you are then looking at metrics where the overall picture is quite different from countries generally considered developed.

NYC actually has fairly little squalor especially for a megacity. There are a certain number of people living in poverty, but the poverty line in the US is actually pretty high.
This is already addressed both for and against; and also off-topic, so if you want to discuss it further it should be by PM.

Let me reiterate my point about NYC, with emphasis: "This is not to mention the recent history of extensive squalor in pinnacles of the first world such as New York City"
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Old 07-08-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: In the heights
34,605 posts, read 33,891,523 times
Reputation: 18992
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissionIMPOSSIBRU View Post
This is already addressed both for and against; and also off-topic, so if you want to discuss it further it should be by PM.

Let me reiterate my point about NYC, with emphasis: "This is not to mention the recent history of extensive squalor in pinnacles of the first world such as New York City"
I don't see how it's off topic. It's a direct statement of India not being a developed country and therefore its dense cities do not qualify as candidates. I admit I have never been to India, but by many metrics and definitions of what constitutes a developed or first world country (not going by the original Cold War coinage of the term but even then India is disqualified).

I think a reasonable rough guide is to use the top tier for rankings of HDI or inequality-adjusted HDI despite its issues.
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Old 07-09-2013, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Westminster, London
878 posts, read 1,319,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
I don't see how it's off topic. It's a direct statement of India not being a developed country and therefore its dense cities do not qualify as candidates.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rozenn View Post
It seems that on every thread that mentions the phrases "first world" or "third world", there is a discussion about their meaning and what country belongs to which category. A bit off topic.
Politeness doesn't mean that it's any less a moderator warning.

Even if the subject was on-topic, we've already covered the arguments both for and against the idea including the meaningfulness of GDP per capita in countries with rural demographics like India.
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