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View Poll Results: Most Racist Developed Countries
Norway 7 1.85%
Australia 55 14.51%
America 116 30.61%
Germany 23 6.07%
Netherlands 7 1.85%
Sweden 10 2.64%
Ireland 12 3.17%
New Zealand 1 0.26%
Switzerland 16 4.22%
Japan 132 34.83%
Voters: 379. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-13-2021, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,759 posts, read 6,827,253 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Just had to google minstrel to understand the issue. Have heard the word before but that is about it.
A shocking mispelling of minstrel in my post.
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Old 03-14-2021, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
A shocking mispelling of minstrel in my post.
Well it is a far from common word here.

I am not game to tell them about the cheese that has just been renamed. You can if you are brave.
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Old 03-14-2021, 09:00 PM
 
1,636 posts, read 746,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Hollywood films have hardly any influence on Australian culture as far as African Americans are concerned, it that that we are referring to, and their is no way you could ever say that the American influence in Australia was a big in the 1930's as the 1970's.
" Even when TV came into Australia in 1956, it was mostly local or British content. US content and culture become more mainstream in Australia in the 1970's and 80's." Really?

BTW In 1963 the Senate Select Committee on the Encouragement of Australian Productions for Television, chaired by Senator Victor Vincent (known as the Vincent Committee) presented its report to federal parliament and its findings painted a bleak picture for local producers—the Committee found that 97% per cent of all television drama shown on Australian TV between 1956 and 1963 was imported from the Un. ited Stateshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television_in_Australia

Can you name a source when TV came into Australia it was mostly local or British content 60 years ago?

BTW the many thousands of US troops on Australia during WW2 did transform Australia. It did not chance because of changing defence ties but also cultural.

BTW speaking of film going:

Film-going had become one of the most popular pastimes for Australian people during World War II, as motion pictures provided a form of escapism from the horrors of the real wartime world. In 1945 alone, 151 million cinema admissions were recorded in Australia. Most of the films shown on Australian screens between the 1940s and ’50s, however, were produced by American companies. Australian-made films were in very short supply in the early 1950s. Many of the American films appealed to a teenage audience with their depiction of radical American social themes and ideals. This exposure undoubtedly had an impact upon impressionable adolescents, sparking the birth of a new youth culture in Australia.https://www.britannica.com/place/Aus...opular-culture

If the US culture in Australia was small, then how would one explain the popularity of Elvis, Bill Haley's hit song Rock Around the Clock, Why would guys in Australia then have hairstyles like Elvis and James dean and wear clothes like them?

Plus it was an American Hawaian that introduced surfing to Australia over one hundred years ago.

In addition there is the Aboriginal freedom rides of the 1960s to NSW country towns and they were influenced by the Black civil rights of that era.

BTW both the US and Australia has traditionally shared the fear of China. When the US supported Independent Taiwan in the 1940s, Australia was quick to accept an Independant Taiwan, and the US broke off diplomatic relations with China at that time, Australia did the same. Yet the US opened diplomatic relations with China in the early 1970s, Australia followed suit. When the US got heavily military involved in Indochina, Australia followed suit.

Last edited by herenow1; 03-14-2021 at 09:53 PM..
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Old 03-14-2021, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,759 posts, read 6,827,253 times
Reputation: 3986
Quote:
Originally Posted by herenow1 View Post
" Even when TV came into Australia in 1956, it was mostly local or British content. US content and culture become more mainstream in Australia in the 1970's and 80's." Really?

BTW In 1963 the Senate Select Committee on the Encouragement of Australian Productions for Television, chaired by Senator Victor Vincent (known as the Vincent Committee) presented its report to federal parliament and its findings painted a bleak picture for local producers—the Committee found that 97% per cent of all television drama shown on Australian TV between 1956 and 1963 was imported from the Un. ited Stateshttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television_in_Australia


BTW the many thousands of US troops on Australia during WW2 did transform Australia. It did not chance because of changing defence ties but also cultural.

BTW speaking of film going:

Film-going had become one of the most popular pastimes for Australian people during World War II, as motion pictures provided a form of escapism from the horrors of the real wartime world. In 1945 alone, 151 million cinema admissions were recorded in Australia. Most of the films shown on Australian screens between the 1940s and ’50s, however, were produced by American companies. Australian-made films were in very short supply in the early 1950s. Many of the American films appealed to a teenage audience with their depiction of radical American social themes and ideals. This exposure undoubtedly had an impact upon impressionable adolescents, sparking the birth of a new youth culture in Australia.https://www.britannica.com/place/Aus...opular-culture

If the US culture in Australia was small, then how would one explain the popularity of Elvis, Bill Haley's hit song Rock Around the Clock, Why would guys in Australia then have hairstyles like Elvis and James dean and wear clothes like them?

Plus it was an American Hawaian that introduced surfing to Australia over one hundred years ago.

In addition there is the Aboriginal freedom rides of the 1960s to NSW country towns and they were influenced by the Black civil rights of that era.

BTW both the US and Australia has traditionally shared the fear of China. When the US supported Independent Taiwan in the 1940s, Australia was quick to accept an Independant Taiwan, and the US broke off diplomatic relations with China at that time, Australia did the same. Yet the US opened diplomatic relations with China in the early 1970s, Australia followed suit. When the US got heavily military involved in Indochina, Australia followed suit.
Sigh have did you actually read anything i said? Elvis, Billy Haley and James Dean are NOT African Americas. I am talking about negative sterotypes on African Americans, so why are you speaking of people who are not.

Most of Soldiers were in World War 2 were stationed in Brisbane, that is well known very well known up here, though its fair to say they did not like them. The biggest Riot in Brisbane's history was between US and Australian Soldiers during World war 2, so much for positive cultural influences.

In Rural QLD in the 1970's we had ONE TV channel and that was the ABC, which was almost entirely British and Australian content. A lot of the area West of us did not have any TV at all.
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Old 03-14-2021, 11:21 PM
 
1,636 posts, read 746,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Sigh have did you actually read anything i said? Elvis, Billy Haley and James Dean are NOT African Americas. I am talking about negative sterotypes on African Americans, so why are you speaking of people who are not.

Most of Soldiers were in World War 2 were stationed in Brisbane, that is well known very well known up here, though its fair to say they did not like them. The biggest Riot in Brisbane's history was between US and Australian Soldiers during World war 2, so much for positive cultural influences.

In Rural QLD in the 1970's we had ONE TV channel and that was the ABC, which was almost entirely British and Australian content. A lot of the area West of us did not have any TV at all.
Well living in Rural Queensland then would be different from the cities as they were more exposed to US programs and culture. You did not have channel 9 which appeared in 1956 in Australia nor what was Channel 7 which televised then the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.

You said there was very little US content in TV in Australia in the late 1950s. Sure if one lived in a rural area that may be the case, but it depended on where you lived.

Plus why was the Childrens game "Cowboys and Indians" used to be a popular game in Australia from the 1950s until the so called 1970s? Plus why the hell did less children play Ned Kelly and cattle duffing and playing Aboriginals having corroborees as common as Coyboys and Indians? It because of the impact of US film had in Australia. I never heard my dad who was a child during the 1940s and 1950s ever mention about playing Ned Kelly or playing corroborees. He did mention playing Coyboys and Indians.

BTW Australians were programmed during the cold war about the threat of communism and the domino theory. It was the American influence in Australia then that largely brought that on. With that most Australians supported US efforts in Vietnam and also supported Australian troops to fight with the Americans against the Communisits. But the so called Mother Country the UK did not send troops to Vietnam. Australians then thought they were fighting a good cause to fight off the communist threat. BTW the UK then did not see communism as a big threat to their society than Australia did. But that changed in the UK 1980s with Margaret Thacher outspoken anti Communist stances.

Last edited by herenow1; 03-15-2021 at 12:03 AM..
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Old 03-15-2021, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,759 posts, read 6,827,253 times
Reputation: 3986
Quote:
Originally Posted by herenow1 View Post
Well living in Rural Queensland then would be different from the cities as they were more exposed to US programs and culture. You did not have channel 9 which appeared in 1956 in Australia nor what was Channel 7 which televised then the 1956 Melbourne Olympics.

You said there was very little US content in TV in Australia in the late 1950s. Sure if one lived in a rural area that may be the case, but it depended on where you lived.

Plus why was the Childrens game "Cowboys and Indians" used to be a popular game in Australia from the 1950s until the so called 1970s? Plus why the hell did less children play Ned Kelly and cattle duffing and playing Aboriginals having corroborees as common as Coyboys and Indians? It because of the impact of US film had in Australia. I never heard my dad who was a child during the 1940s and 1950s ever mention about playing Ned Kelly or playing corroborees. He did mention playing Coyboys and Indians.

BTW Australians were programmed during the cold war about the threat of communism and the domino theory. It was the American influence in Australia then that largely brought that on. With that most Australians supported US efforts in Vietnam and also supported Australian troops to fight with the Americans against the Communisits. But the so called Mother Country the UK did not send troops to Vietnam. Australians then thought they were fighting a good cause to fight off the communist threat. BTW the UK then did not see communism as a big threat to their society than Australia did. But that changed in the UK 1980s with Margaret Thacher outspoken anti Communist stances.
The rise of communism, and domino theory, Vietnam etc was what i was referring to when saying political and military ties, and once again has nothing to do with negative depictions of African Americans.

We hardly ever played cowboys and Indians as Kids, our big favorite to copy and play as kids was "Monkey" which is Japanese Dubbed to English by the BBC. I don't think the original 70's version of the show was ever shown in the US (I cannot really find a source to say that it was).

We would certainly never play "corroborees" growing up in a community with an ever present aboriginal population, you learn that's a no no very quickly (we would call it racist in 2021). Though we did spend a good deal of time looking for old aboriginal artifacts as kids, we also read children's books about the dream time, and painted with Orchre we found lying around.

Also you original post about Australian TV in 1963, was pretty much the peak time for US shows in Australia. The local content laws were introduced the year before to reduce the American content. However you are correct in saying the US did dominate our TV content from 1956 to 1963.

Last edited by danielsa1775; 03-15-2021 at 01:52 AM..
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Old 03-15-2021, 03:39 AM
 
1,636 posts, read 746,430 times
Reputation: 1625
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
The rise of communism, and domino theory, Vietnam etc was what i was referring to when saying political and military ties, and once again has nothing to do with negative depictions of African Americans.

We hardly ever played cowboys and Indians as Kids, our big favorite to copy and play as kids was "Monkey" which is Japanese Dubbed to English by the BBC. I don't think the original 70's version of the show was ever shown in the US (I cannot really find a source to say that it was).

We would certainly never play "corroborees" growing up in a community with an ever present aboriginal population, you learn that's a no no very quickly (we would call it racist in 2021). Though we did spend a good deal of time looking for old aboriginal artifacts as kids, we also read children's books about the dream time, and painted with Orchre we found lying around.

Also you original post about Australian TV in 1963, was pretty much the peak time for US shows in Australia. The local content laws were introduced the year before to reduce the American content. However you are correct in saying the US did dominate our TV content from 1956 to 1963.
Well the only films I have seen of Australia of the 1950s was the Melbourne Olympics and Jeddah. The later one would be too politically incorrect if it is shown today. Of course more Australian production of film occured from the 1960s onwards. Yet Australians then were much more exposed to foreign cultures than previous generations. I am sure there were some voices opposed to the introduction of TV in the 1950s and one aspect is due to the fear Australia will loose their identiy with mosly US shows.


Of course the US TV series content has been traditionally very white, and does not truly reflect the diversity of the US. Australia is no different with their content on TV. It is more difficult for a person of colour to rise in the media than a non white person.
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