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View Poll Results: Culinary culture
Canada 8 61.54%
Australia 5 38.46%
Voters: 13. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-08-2014, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,744 posts, read 33,971,262 times
Reputation: 10836

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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
There's more than French culture. Australia grows a lot more produce. We can grow tropical fruits, too. How you liking it freezing up there in your igloo anyway? lol
Except that Canada is not a frozen island on its own. It is hitched up to a huge landmass that has vast tropical areas.

The growing season ended several months ago here and there's been snow on the ground for more than a month, but my kitchen right now is still full of every kind of fresh fruit and vegetable imaginable.

Modern transportation is a wonderful thing.
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:21 PM
 
14,780 posts, read 16,065,625 times
Reputation: 20626
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyOyIn8 View Post
I live 5 hours from Canadian border btw. Western Canada (Vancouver/British Columbia) area has pretty mild winters and above freezing actually. Southern Canada where vast majority of Canadians live have 4 distinct seasons. Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec has warmer summers than Sydney, Canberra and Melbourne. I love 4 seasons.

How does it feel like living in an isolated island country far from everywhere, driving on wrong side of the road, sharks in oceans, opposite seasons and no snow in Christmas?

Nearly 40 million people live in Canada vs only 23 million in Australia which tells me which new world nation is more popular
LOL. You just reminded me how damn lucky I am
Cheers
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Old 01-08-2014, 09:45 PM
 
Location: The Downunderverse
600 posts, read 879,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artemis agrotera View Post
LOL. You just reminded me how damn lucky I am
Cheers
If that means we're isolated from Americans, I'd say we're VERY lucky.
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Old 01-08-2014, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
3,186 posts, read 2,603,443 times
Reputation: 4527
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
In Perth we're 3-4 hours from Bali, cheap, delicious food, 5 hours from Singapore and within 8 hours of all of SEA. Canada has Mexico which, while cool, is more homogeneous. Vancouver is basically 11 hours to anywhere even OUTSIDE of North America, if you wanna talk about isolated lol. As a percentage more people here are born overseas than in Canada, so we get all kinds of cuisines. Give me our mild winters where one can often go around in a T-shirt rather than your severe winters where people would die without heating or shelter. Sharks? lol. More people are killed by bears than sharks a year. Snow on Christmas might be nice, but I think we can live without it...nor do we have to contend with hazardous icy roads. Australia really is the lucky country, I'm glad I live here instead of an icebox like Canada.
Postman, you've always struck me as a calm, reasoned, contributor to these fora. I think you know that a lot of what you've posted is stretching it.

Toronto and Montreal, for example, are two hours away from Orlando, Florida. Two-and-a-half from Dallas, Texas; and five from Los Angeles. Vancouver is two-or-so hours away from Los Angeles; five from Hawaii. Canada is not nearly as isolated as you make it sound, if one wants to get away to a warm place during the winter. You're correct that getting outside of North America requires a long flight, but if all I'm after is better weather, why would I go to southern Spain (seven hours out of Toronto) when I can find warm weather and beaches in Florida, the Bahamas, Jamaica, or Cuba (two-or-so hours out of Toronto)?

I've been to Perth, WA, a few times. I like the city (King's Park is a treasure, and the pedestrian Murray and Hay Streets are something I wish we had more of here), I like the people. I've only ever been there during Perth winters, and you are correct: they are nothing like ours, and I often did not need a coat. But I don't think I'd characterize Canada as an icebox. Summers can be extremely hot; I was surprised to see on a summertime trip to Yellowknife NWT, that homes had flower gardens and lawns, and restaurants had outdoor patios.

Living here in Alberta, as I do, with close proximity to national mountain parks, I can agree that people are killed by bears. Sadly, many of them are foreign tourists, who don't seem to realize that the wildlife in the parks, is just that--wildlife. Bears, elk, cougars, even squirrels--none are domesticated, and all roam the parks freely, where they are protected. In spite of the warnings that all (even locals) get from parks staff when they enter the park, certain foreigners ignore the warnings and get mauled. Few, if any, locals are--we locals know that these are dangerous animals, and give them a wide berth if we encounter them in the wild.

And snow? I guess it depends on what you're used to. If you're not used to snow and cold in winter, then you'll be happy without it. If you're used to snow and cold in winter, then you do what you can to deal with it: coats, mitts, hats, boots. One can learn to drive on snow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
... Aside from maybe Quebec Canada is not much different to Australia.
Being a English-speaking Canadian who has been to Australia (and Quebec), we can agree on this.
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Old 01-09-2014, 05:52 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 27,766,236 times
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Canada, of course. Australia is just a horrible, hot desert full of nasty venomous insects and man-eating alligators. The culture is so boring and uninteresting, they have to important it from other countries (otherwise, they would surf all day and then cook shrimp at night). Their claim to fame is Steve Irwin and he's dead now. Not to mention Perth is the most isolated major city in the world, and is full of junkies and uneducated truck drivers. Sydney is nothing special once you've been to the Opera House. Melbourne is the only city with anything going for it. Oh, did I forget that their accents are ridiculous? I can't take anything they say seriously. Their Prime Minister sounds like a clown.

Poor Australia. It's a joke.

*waits to see how 'The Postman' responds. *
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Old 01-09-2014, 06:08 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
4,653 posts, read 6,662,516 times
Reputation: 3846
Quote:
Originally Posted by dunno what to put here View Post
Canada, of course. Australia is just a horrible, hot desert full of nasty venomous insects and man-eating alligators. The culture is so boring and uninteresting, they have to important it from other countries (otherwise, they would surf all day and then cook shrimp at night). Their claim to fame is Steve Irwin and he's dead now. Not to mention Perth is the most isolated major city in the world, and is full of junkies and uneducated truck drivers. Sydney is nothing special once you've been to the Opera House. Melbourne is the only city with anything going for it. Oh, did I forget that their accents are ridiculous? I can't take anything they say seriously. Their Prime Minister sounds like a clown.

Poor Australia. It's a joke.

*waits to see how 'The Postman' responds. *
Your incorrect, there are no alligators in Australia
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Old 01-09-2014, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Paris
8,199 posts, read 8,132,666 times
Reputation: 3530
Hmm, wasn't this thread supposed to be about food?
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Old 01-09-2014, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Finland
24,257 posts, read 22,917,331 times
Reputation: 11103
You want fries with that?
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Old 01-09-2014, 07:12 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 19,225,263 times
Reputation: 2833
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Postman, you've always struck me as a calm, reasoned, contributor to these fora. I think you know that a lot of what you've posted is stretching it.

Toronto and Montreal, for example, are two hours away from Orlando, Florida. Two-and-a-half from Dallas, Texas; and five from Los Angeles. Vancouver is two-or-so hours away from Los Angeles; five from Hawaii. Canada is not nearly as isolated as you make it sound, if one wants to get away to a warm place during the winter. You're correct that getting outside of North America requires a long flight, but if all I'm after is better weather, why would I go to southern Spain (seven hours out of Toronto) when I can find warm weather and beaches in Florida, the Bahamas, Jamaica, or Cuba (two-or-so hours out of Toronto)?

I've been to Perth, WA, a few times. I like the city (King's Park is a treasure, and the pedestrian Murray and Hay Streets are something I wish we had more of here), I like the people. I've only ever been there during Perth winters, and you are correct: they are nothing like ours, and I often did not need a coat. But I don't think I'd characterize Canada as an icebox. Summers can be extremely hot; I was surprised to see on a summertime trip to Yellowknife NWT, that homes had flower gardens and lawns, and restaurants had outdoor patios.

Living here in Alberta, as I do, with close proximity to national mountain parks, I can agree that people are killed by bears. Sadly, many of them are foreign tourists, who don't seem to realize that the wildlife in the parks, is just that--wildlife. Bears, elk, cougars, even squirrels--none are domesticated, and all roam the parks freely, where they are protected. In spite of the warnings that all (even locals) get from parks staff when they enter the park, certain foreigners ignore the warnings and get mauled. Few, if any, locals are--we locals know that these are dangerous animals, and give them a wide berth if we encounter them in the wild.

And snow? I guess it depends on what you're used to. If you're not used to snow and cold in winter, then you'll be happy without it. If you're used to snow and cold in winter, then you do what you can to deal with it: coats, mitts, hats, boots. One can learn to drive on snow.

Being a English-speaking Canadian who has been to Australia (and Quebec), we can agree on this.
Well people on this board keep saying Australia is isolated, and yes it is compared to a lot of places, but parts of North America are too. For a lot of people isolation means isolated from the US and Europe. Perth is a closer flight to more other countries than say, Vancouver is, I just wanted to point out that Australia isn't necessarily more isolated, it depends where. Neither are as ideal as somewhere like Dubai though, unless you consider the USA the centre of the world. Well yes if you just want warmer weather. I travel for many reasons, so I don't mind the long flights...

Oh, someone who's been to Perth, nice...yeah King's Park is nice, the view of Perth is quite special. Btw did you know the graphic of the city skyline of the city data logo is of Perth? The night-time one. I thought that was kind of random for an American site, I guess it shows our skyline really is quite nice lol.

Yeah I mean it's not like arctic year round, just too cold for me personally. I think even Vancouver would be too much, but I mean snow is pretty cool.

Yes Alberta is very beautiful. I'm not overly worried about bears, but the idea of meeting a bear seems scarier than the snakes.etc foreigners are so worried about here. I've been hiking lots and never actually seen a snake in the bush (ironically I've seen one on a vacant lot though), at least a live one.

But yeah I hope to visit Canada next time I go to the US. Would like to do a cross-country trip, as I've done one of the US already.
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Old 01-09-2014, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
25,744 posts, read 33,971,262 times
Reputation: 10836
I hope this thread stays respectful and doesn't get shut down. There is interesting potential here.
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