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Old 01-31-2014, 08:44 PM
 
Location: East coast
613 posts, read 976,689 times
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Just wondering how strong of an identity they have to their continent of origin versus continent where they live/grew up?

I have actually met at least two groups of people coming from the continent of Africa that are non-African in origin - white South Africans and other folks of European ancestry in Africa, and (Asian) Indian diasporic communities. Some lived in East African countries like Kenya. Much of this is the product of colonialism.

In the case of South Africa, most are happy to say that they are from South Africa. For those in East Africa and other places, I have known two examples: one girl who is of Indian descent who lived in an African country that seems to identify more with Indian cultural communities after emigrating from there but I also knew a guy who lived and grew up in East Africa (for a time longer in duration than for the girl I mentioned), also of Indian descent but who told others he was "from Africa".
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Old 02-02-2014, 01:04 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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In my experience, Indians tend to hang on more to their cultural identity more, especially in countries outside the US where they are largely represented, like Guyana, Trinidad, Jamaica is sort of an exception for the Indians there are more integrated and identify more with Jamaica, Kenya, Tanzania, UAE, Fiji. I'm not sure about South Africa.
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Old 10-27-2014, 08:35 PM
 
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In Senegal (West Africa), there is a lebanon diaspora and the last generation consider themselves as senegalais. Most of them have never seen their original country so yes people living in Africa for years do not have any problems saying that they are african
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Old 02-19-2015, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Nairobi
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I am a Kenyan of Indian descent. when people ask me where I am from I say Kenya and then wait to answer where I am originally from. Lol. I am Kenyan.
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Old 08-02-2015, 08:06 AM
 
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Oh, I don't know, maybe colization.
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Old 08-02-2015, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
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I think almost everyone born in mainland Africa see theirself as African, except maybe the people from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Egypt.

More curious to know how people think on the Islands of the Southwestern Indian Ocean (Madagascar, Reunion, Mauritius, Seychelles, Comoros, Mayotte).

I think the people on the Islands of the Atlantic Ocean (Cape Verde, Sao Tome & Principe, Bioko) see theirself as African.
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Old 08-02-2015, 11:51 PM
 
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I have a friend from Evypt who has a very light skin.
And he is a Naturalized American Citizen. So we call him "African American".
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Old 08-03-2015, 11:31 AM
Status: "Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast." (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,349 posts, read 20,049,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCardinals View Post
I have a friend from Evypt who has a very light skin.
And he is a Naturalized American Citizen. So we call him "African American".
Wouldn't he be Egyptian-American since the term African-American is colloquially reserved for descendants of the slaves who came from various countries in West Africa?

Would someone from Peru who becomes a naturalized citizen in the U.S. be called a 'South American-American' or a Peruvian American?
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Old 08-03-2015, 01:19 PM
 
Location: DMV Area/NYC/Honolulu
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All the white South Africans and white Zimbabweans I know proudly say that they are "South Africans," "Zimbabweans," or just "African."
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Old 03-24-2020, 10:34 PM
 
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Default White South African, Africans :)

You are referring to Caucasian South Africans I assume ... So I will only focus on them.

There are a significant number of Boer (means "farmers") and Afrikaner SA Caucasians whose mixture of Belgian, French, Dutch, Swiss, Flemish, German, Portugese, ancestors, built SA from a wilderness into a first world country, almost 400 years ago. They hold SA passports only, and are not at all legally eligible to obtain any European passport based on ancestry alone, because they have no known living European ancestors -These descendants are genuine South African, "Africans", as they have been born and bred in Africa and their generations go almost four centuries back in history. There are currently requests to certain European countries to allow them legal European ancestral citizenship, but it may or may not ever happen. I have doubts.

Shortly after the Boers /Afrikaners arrived in southern Africa, the British arrived from Britain. Their descendants of which, usually hold dual passports and are legally eligible to emigrate back to Britain. Thus they are considered "British expats in Africa". Those who cancelled their British citizenships, were born and bred in SA, and married Boers /Afrikaners are considered "African".

There are also more recent European arrivals from all over Europe mainly, living and working in SA, but they still mostly have accents and legal citizenship (dual passports) from their European countries. Thus these are still considered "European expats in Africa", not African, unless they were born and bred in SA and cancelled their European passports - Only then are they considered "African".

Hope this helps
I'm from the Boer White African tribe
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