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Old 02-02-2014, 10:25 AM
 
Location: East coast
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On the flip side of whether or not immigrant communities are accepted in their new adopted homeland, how about how their old or previous ancestral countries view them?

For example, what does Italy think about Italian-Americans, India think of Indian-British or China think about Chinese-Australians? I'd imagine the old country feels connected to those who have recently immigrated or still have family in connection to the old homeland that share a common culture.

However, if the connection or family ties are no longer present, do they romanticize at all any connection based on ancestry or "blood"? Or simply see them as another member of the new country (be it American, Aussie, British etc.), with no special bond. For those far removed for the original homeland in generations or possibly just cultural assimilation, I'd imagine this is so.

You hear many times an Irish- or Italian-American going overseas to Ireland or Italy and finding out they have nothing in common with the Europeans and even that the Europeans just see them as simply American with the stereotypes associated with Americans. That happens to Black Americans going to visit a country in Africa too.

Do you think this is generally true? The other possibility is what about cases where an immigrant or refugee, or possibly political dissident, flees from a country to escape war/ political strife and is seen as a "traitor" by the original country, though this seems less common except in politically brutal regimes.
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markovian process View Post
On the flip side of whether or not immigrant communities are accepted in their new adopted homeland, how about how their old or previous ancestral countries view them?

For example, what does Italy think about Italian-Americans, India think of Indian-British or China think about Chinese-Australians? I'd imagine the old country feels connected to those who have recently immigrated or still have family in connection to the old homeland that share a common culture.

However, if the connection or family ties are no longer present, do they romanticize at all any connection based on ancestry or "blood"? Or simply see them as another member of the new country (be it American, Aussie, British etc.), with no special bond. For those far removed for the original homeland in generations or possibly just cultural assimilation, I'd imagine this is so.

You hear many times an Irish- or Italian-American going overseas to Ireland or Italy and finding out they have nothing in common with the Europeans and even that the Europeans just see them as simply American with the stereotypes associated with Americans. That happens to Black Americans going to visit a country in Africa too.

Do you think this is generally true? The other possibility is what about cases where an immigrant or refugee, or possibly political dissident, flees from a country to escape war/ political strife and is seen as a "traitor" by the original country, though this seems less common except in politically brutal regimes.
I think most Italians would see most Italians as more just Americans with Italian ancestry. I think not speaking Italian is a big deal. Though there are similarities the culture is still pretty different.

It's funny there are some Malaysian Chinese or Chinese Malaysians who think it's weird I don't speak Mandarin because I'm Chinese, despite the fact I'm Australian, and am Chinese really only in ancestry, yet Chinese people consider me more just Australian since they sort of appreciate the cultural gulf more, if that makes sense, whereas Malaysia has more similarities to Australia.

I consider myself more Singaporean after Australian, since that's where my more recent ancestry is, yet some Singaporeans of Chinese ancestry will even just say 'I'm Chinese', which I think is because in Singapore they classify people by 'race', even if culturally they are very different. I've heard of many Singaporeans going to China and experiencing a lot of culture shock, even if they might speak Mandarin or eat some Chinese food, and celebrate CNY etc, the culture is still very different.
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:17 PM
 
Location: singapore
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Originally Posted by The Postman View Post

I consider myself more Singaporean after Australian, since that's where my more recent ancestry is, yet some Singaporeans of Chinese ancestry will even just say 'I'm Chinese', which I think is because in Singapore they classify people by 'race', even if culturally they are very different. I've heard of many Singaporeans going to China and experiencing a lot of culture shock, even if they might speak Mandarin or eat some Chinese food, and celebrate CNY etc, the culture is still very different.

Yes in Singapore we generally classify by race... But racial harmony is very important over here..

Little tolerance if someone makes a remark targetted at a certain race or religion..
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Old 02-02-2014, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by singaporelady View Post
Yes in Singapore we generally classify by race... But racial harmony is very important over here..

Little tolerance if someone makes a remark targetted at a certain race or religion..
Yes, and people of all 'races' generally hang out, while I hear in Malaysia it's a bit more segregated. I feel the segregation in Malaysia has grown worse over time as well, plus Malays live under stricter religious laws and it's not easy for Malays to date non-Muslims. If you marry a Muslim you have to convert or the Muslim has to renounce Islam, legally (I'm not sure if that is illegal). Basically there is no real religious freedom if you are Malay.

English is another reason, although I find the dominance of Mandarin fosters a sort of Chinese insularity...
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Old 02-03-2014, 06:12 AM
 
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I think Chinese expect Chinese Americans that visit China to know how to speak Chinese fluently and this is not usually the case.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:11 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
I think Chinese expect Chinese Americans that visit China to know how to speak Chinese fluently and this is not usually the case.
Some do. One Thai girl didn't believe me when I told her I was Australian.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Overall I would say that most people in the ancestral homeland see their diasporas as "gone" and as full citizens of their new home, not the old one. They usually aren't very interested by the diaspora people, either. Unless they meet a diaspora person who speaks the old language fluently and is fairly ensconced in the old country's culture, in which case they are often delightfully surprised.

But other than that, they won't consider you as one of them simply because of bloodlines or your surname, unless of course you are part of their family. And even then...

My observation is that this is usually the case as described above. Although there are some exceptions but these are the minority.

This is often disappointing for diaspora people who return to an ancestral homeland and expect to be greeted with open arms like a long lost cousin, but this almost never happens. (Unless as I said you have family members waiting for you.)

Last edited by Acajack; 02-03-2014 at 07:46 AM..
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Overall I would say that most people in the ancestral homeland see their diasporas as "gone" and as full citizens of their new home, not the old one. They usually aren't very interested by the diaspora people, either. Unless they meet a diaspora person who speaks the old language fluently and is fairly ensconced in the old country's culture, in which case they are often delightfully surprised.

But other than that, they won't consider you as one of them simply because of bloodlines or your surname, unless of course you are part of their family. And even then...

My observation is that this is usually the case as described above. Although there are some exceptions but these are the minority.

This is often disappointing for diaspora people who return to an ancestral homeland and expect to be greeted with open arms like a long lost, but this almost never happens. (Unless as I said you have family members waiting for you.)
Japanese Brazilians who returned 'home' to Japan were often discriminated against and experienced a clash of cultures (since they were basically Brazilians culturally) to such an extent many returned home to Brazil.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,101,661 times
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I am not of Italian origin (as far as I know anyway), but I do think of Italy a lot when this topic is raised because my wife and I have spent a lot of time there, I know quite a few Italians and obviously it is one of the world's larger and most visible diasporas.

Italians by and large don't seem interested by their global diaspora. Sometimes it's almost as if they go out of their way to be disinterested, as if the large-scale emigration (and the economic hardship that caused it) were a bad memory for them that they'd rather forget.
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Old 02-03-2014, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,101,661 times
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Often times the old country's interest in the diaspora has been a question of enlisting men of X ethnic origin in the military the moment they set foot in the country, even if they weren't born there, and don't even speak the national language!
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