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Old 02-21-2014, 09:01 PM
 
Location: East coast
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From the foreign cuisines thread, I notice that besides Italian and Greek cuisines, Americans, Canadians, Australians are more likely to notice Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Japanese, Middle Eastern etc. foods as topping the list of the more common ethnic cuisines in their cities.

Why are there not more European cuisines like French, German, Austrian, Swiss, Scandinavian, Russian etc. served in restaurants in these countries? Yes, I know there are restaurants obviously from all over in these countries, but it seems proportionally fewer, relative to the size of the immigrant communities.

I mean, Japanese or Thai communities aren't particularly big in many cities where Japanese and Thai food is super popular. There's got to be much larger populations of Western Europeans to get a pool of cuisines from. Do you think it is because the Western Europeans and even other Europeans arrived earlier and assimilated earlier so didn't end up starting restaurants or bringing their cuisines with them from the Old World?
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Old 02-21-2014, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile
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Where I'm from there is a very big influence of Eastern Europe/Polish heritage. We have polish food everywhere, and our butchers often have polish influences. I think it just depends on the area. I think a lot is that most European immigrants have been here longer and thus have Americanized.
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Old 02-21-2014, 09:52 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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It's probably due to a few things. Most non-Anglo immigrants came to the US, Canada, and Australia in large numbers much earlier and have either assimilated into the larger host culture or have had parts of their cuisine assimilated into that larger host culture. The other is that some of the dishes are actually somewhat shared in the European continent in terms of ingredients and techniques so don't stand apart as much and some of them end up seeming like variations of parts of the host culture's cuisine rather than a particularly well-known distinctive cuisine apart. Another is that this emphasis on exploring cuisines of other cultures has been relatively recent and has happened in a time when there has been a greater influx of immigration from other parts of the world.
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Old 02-21-2014, 10:30 PM
 
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Why would you spend a lot of money at a restaurant to eat the kind of food that your mother or grandma cooks?
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Old 02-21-2014, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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I've definitely noticed this too. I noticed the lack of French restaurants/cafes despite the fact that French food is so highly esteemed - although French techniques and recipes are still be to found from quiche to foie gras to crusty baguettes and all kinds of pastries. I guess it's more a 'fine dining thing'. Also a lack of German and Spanish, the latter being considered one of the best cuisines out there, yet there's hardly a Spanish restaurant among the hundreds of Italian restaurants.
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Old 02-22-2014, 12:35 AM
 
Location: Vic, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postman View Post
I've definitely noticed this too. I noticed the lack of French restaurants/cafes despite the fact that French food is so highly esteemed - although French techniques and recipes are still be to found from quiche to foie gras to crusty baguettes and all kinds of pastries. I guess it's more a 'fine dining thing'. Also a lack of German and Spanish, the latter being considered one of the best cuisines out there, yet there's hardly a Spanish restaurant among the hundreds of Italian restaurants.
To the bolded bit: Is it?
There's also hardly any Spanish in Australia. Plenty of Italians though, which explains that. Also take a look in any deli and the German influence shouldn't be hard to spot.
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Old 02-22-2014, 12:51 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by FrankDrebin View Post
To the bolded bit: Is it?
There's also hardly any Spanish in Australia. Plenty of Italians though, which explains that. Also take a look in any deli and the German influence shouldn't be hard to spot.
Yes, I thought it was fairly obvious. It's a stereotype that the French invented fine dining, had the best chefs.etc, maybe it's French snobbery, but they've certainly contributed a lot to fine dining.
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Old 02-22-2014, 12:56 AM
 
Location: Sydney
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Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
Why would you spend a lot of money at a restaurant to eat the kind of food that your mother or grandma cooks?
This. European food is too similar to Anglo food to be as interesting as Asian or Mexican food.
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Old 02-22-2014, 01:33 AM
 
261 posts, read 474,304 times
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Or could it be that Euro based food is simply over rated.

You hear so much about the great food of Paris however, outside of cripes, french fries, and french toast the majority of Americans have never had French food. The only thing French food i riding off of is word of mouth.
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Old 02-22-2014, 02:41 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by RumNCoke View Post
Or could it be that Euro based food is simply over rated.

You hear so much about the great food of Paris however, outside of cripes, french fries, and french toast the majority of Americans have never had French food. The only thing French food i riding off of is word of mouth.
Actually a lot of French things are just integrated into cafe and fine dining culture that some may not even be aware they're French. From French bread, souffles/creme brulee/mousse, crossants (well those ones are more obvious), styles of cooking, e.g. cutting vegetables 'julienne' is an aspect of French cooking technique, as well as the various soups.
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