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Old 12-14-2007, 09:34 AM
 
Location: England
578 posts, read 2,950,057 times
Reputation: 211

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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlmburns View Post
Glasgow? I see you didn't mention any cities in England? funny that!
Glasgow indeed, its hilarious isnt it.
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Old 12-14-2007, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,945,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anarchy View Post
Alcohol is part of the British culture so is the yob culture add both together it just makes things worse, guns are big in the US knifes are big in the UK both as deadly when in the wrong hands and its not uncommon to hear people stabbed or shot outside a bar or club, also many other factors such as segregation which is currently a major issue and unemployment. I believe that a lot of it is to do with the slack of laws and anyone committing any violent act know they will get away with it or let off lightly.

The drink culture on a Friday night in my local town I see more drunks, people puking, women sprawled all over the floor showing all than what I have in Miami or LA on a Friday night.

Gangs of teens hanging on street corners at night scares many people not to go out at night especially older people as they will be mocked, called names or even worse. Every so often in the newspaper a "Have ago Hero" is reported dead after confronting yobs for causing a nuisance, police are supposed to break gangs up bigger than 4 or around that and send them on their way but they never do.

I posted up some articles about the yob culture in another thread I try to find the links, anyway these are some of the main factors.

Forgot to add, maybe the weather does add to the problems I dont know but its very depressing weather especially in the Winter when it gets light late and dark early maybe something a bottle of Scotch can help with.

I agree Anarchy and I feel that should Britain find a way to resolve the drinking issue , it would solve most of its social ills. As for the weather, it's pretty dark in Paris at this time of year too and grey and drizzly but it doesn't seem to influence people's drinking habits.
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Old 12-14-2007, 10:01 AM
 
Location: England
578 posts, read 2,950,057 times
Reputation: 211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
I agree Anarchy and I feel that should Britain find a way to resolve the drinking issue , it would solve most of its social ills. As for the weather, it's pretty dark in Paris at this time of year too and grey and drizzly but it doesn't seem to influence people's drinking habits.
Yeah they should I agree, I was once one of these drunks I even used to go to school drunk at times back in the day but now I hardly drink the last time I got drunk was about 5yrs ago and as you stated in your other post you dont need to get drunk to have a good time.

What you say about the weather is true but with the British culture its another excuse to get bladded but I know where your coming from .
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Old 12-14-2007, 10:26 AM
 
1,267 posts, read 3,118,669 times
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so would you say the alcohol issues are a blend of:

- media/celebrity glamorization
- economic and employment troubles
- weather
- social expectations (both to drink and to otherwise repress expression on one side...pretensions to propriety on another)

is alcohol abuse truly not an issue in france? it seems like the europeans i have known - belgian, french, german, italian - tend to like their drinks and to party pretty hardy, and perceive it as more of "part of life" relative to what the more puritanical americans can, and perhaps to what brits can.

what is the legal drinking age in brittany and in the UK?

what in the histories of these places might contribute? to alcohol abuse? to violence?

do you think there might be something genetic to these things?
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Old 12-14-2007, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
13,036 posts, read 22,945,390 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hello-world View Post
so would you say the alcohol issues are a blend of:

- media/celebrity glamorization
- economic and employment troubles
- weather
- social expectations (both to drink and to otherwise repress expression on one side...pretensions to propriety on another)

what is the legal drinking age in brittany and in the UK?

what in the histories of these places might contribute? to alcohol abuse? to violence?

do you think there might be something genetic to these things?
Yes that summarises it pretty well really.

The legal age for both France and the UK is 18 I believe. I think the difference is kids in France are included from babyhood into adlt social life and used to see people drinking in moderation as part of a meal. They don't see it as a forbidden fruit and don't dream of getting drunk as a badge of honour as a lot of UK kids do.

A lot of people in Southern Europe will give VERY watered down wine to their kids from the age of 14, 15 ( basically red water) to make them feel included in gatherings and alcohol stops being a mysterious element reserved for adults.

There is also a kind of stigma attached to people who get drunk publically and people will see them as alcoholics not just casual drinkers. Plenty of people drink too much in France too, I am sure but the ones you see in public are propping up bars all day, mainly late middle age and looked down by people as having a problem not seen as something glamorous or desirable. People don't go out in the evenings to get smashed and being seen vomiting in the streets would certainly be frowned upon !


I think the social aspect of drinking as part of a meal is very important in France, wine is there to complement food not as a means to end up legless.


I don't believe it's genetic unless an entire Nationality can suffer from the same condition ( all from different social backgrounds, education, wealth etc...).
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Old 12-14-2007, 11:12 AM
 
1,267 posts, read 3,118,669 times
Reputation: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer
I don't believe it's genetic unless an entire Nationality can suffer from the same condition ( all from different social backgrounds, education, wealth etc...).
i figure if european royalty can pass along swaths of haemophilia, alcoholism might run in the blood in some sectors, too.
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Old 12-16-2007, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Hell
606 posts, read 589,127 times
Reputation: 85
Detroit
Atlanta
Newark
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Old 12-19-2007, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Miami
888 posts, read 729,026 times
Reputation: 658
Default Most Violent Cities in the World's Developed Countries?

First of all, what criteria is one using for "developed"?
Mexico is considered a "middle-income" country.
Are they to be included?

If we use what I believe the OP intended, developed countries would be limited to US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the EU + non-members.

If that's the case, the US is easily the most violent out of all of the countries mentioned, and so therefore the most violent cities in the world's developed countries would be found in the States.

So ... pick some, and I bet you won't be far from the absolute truth.

If we add middle income countries, one would say that cities in the States, Brazil, Colombia, and South Africa would be on the list.
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Old 12-19-2007, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Minnysoda
10,170 posts, read 9,495,592 times
Reputation: 6378
[quote=hello-world;2252405]so would you say the alcohol issues are a blend of:

- media/celebrity glamorization
- economic and employment troubles
- weather
- social expectations (both to drink and to otherwise repress expression on one side...pretensions to propriety on another)

I wonder if there is a corallation between socialist goverments/programs and alcohol/drug issues?. It's hard to hold a full time job if your pissed up all the time.
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Old 12-20-2007, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Earth
17,444 posts, read 25,654,148 times
Reputation: 7397
[quote=my54ford;2292503]
Quote:
Originally Posted by hello-world View Post
so would you say the alcohol issues are a blend of:

- media/celebrity glamorization
- economic and employment troubles
- weather
- social expectations (both to drink and to otherwise repress expression on one side...pretensions to propriety on another)

I wonder if there is a corallation between socialist goverments/programs and alcohol/drug issues?. It's hard to hold a full time job if your pissed up all the time.
In that case, the US and UK would have less alcohol/drug issues than continental Europe, which is exactly the reverse of how things are, not that there aren't serious drug issues on the continent as well.
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