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Old 11-09-2014, 12:49 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,559 posts, read 24,675,687 times
Reputation: 8888

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
And honestly this has zero to do with Canadians not 'liking' Americans which is a juvenile way of looking.. I've said before and i'll say again on the whole I wouldn't want to be bordered by any other nation in the world.. The two countries have a great relationship.
I agree. The only time the three main North American countries had any conflict was in their infancy. Beyond that, we are all lucky to have the neighbors we have.
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Old 11-09-2014, 12:50 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,559 posts, read 24,675,687 times
Reputation: 8888
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Yeah and NORAD guarantee's it. That pact goes well beyond NATO - it is shared defense of a common Canadian/American border.
Which happens to be the longest unguarded border in the world.
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Old 11-09-2014, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
16,011 posts, read 11,402,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Which happens to be the longest unguarded border in the world.
..by humans. Drones, sensors and air patrols are used to monitor it now.
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Old 11-09-2014, 12:53 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,559 posts, read 24,675,687 times
Reputation: 8888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Some people in California do sound like Vancouverites, but I still hear a lot of a twang when I'm there. I just got back actually.

Even the people who sound similar to Vancouverites still pronounced certain words differently by putting the emphasis in different places and of course the elongated vowels some Americans use.

Two that stand out are " detail " and "permit " ( as in needing a permit from city hall ).
This depends on where you are in California too as there are slight differences between northern and southern California. Berkeley, Oakland and San Francisco also have a slight difference from the rest which can be heard in long time residents and natives. For starters, there is no caught/cot merger. Northern CA tends to have more rounded vowels as well.
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Old 11-09-2014, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
16,011 posts, read 11,402,779 times
Reputation: 9845
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
This depends on where you are in California too as there are slight differences between northern and southern California. Berkeley, Oakland and San Francisco also have a slight difference from the rest which can be heard in long time residents and natives. For starters, there is no caught/cot merger. Northern CA tends to have more rounded vowels as well.
Yes, true. However as similar as the accents can be, an American and a Canadian can usually tell after a minute or so of conversation that they have slightly different ways of speaking.

Others outside of the US and Canada have a greater difficulty, like I do sometimes between a New Zealander and an Aussie.
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Old 11-09-2014, 01:14 PM
 
Location: London, UK
9,992 posts, read 11,158,107 times
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To me a Canadian and a American that's not from Southern USA sound exactly the same to me or less the American shouts out ''USA USA USA'' or ''YEAHHHH 'MURICA'' or something along those lines.
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Old 11-09-2014, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,892 posts, read 12,787,753 times
Reputation: 3954
Quote:
Originally Posted by P London View Post
To me a Canadian and a American that's not from Southern USA sound exactly the same to me or less the American shouts out ''USA USA USA'' or ''YEAHHHH 'MURICA'' or something along those lines.
Actually its funny - when I was in Morocco quite a few people had mistaken me for being for being British (My ancestry is Scottish so that is ok in terms of how I look of course) but they had mistaken me even after I was speaking to them in my 'Canamerican' accent.. I thought wow that is weird the accent is completely different from British like totally.. Point being is you may not detect the difference between a 'Canadian' accent and American but it is certainly there. As soon as I cross the border from Canada to Buffalo which is only 120 km from Toronto I instantly notice a difference. The more familiar you would become with Canada and America the more you'd pick up on the differences... Even within Canada you can detect differences - listen to a native from Newfoundland
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Old 11-09-2014, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,256 posts, read 26,640,835 times
Reputation: 8760
I used to think Americans and Canadians sounded the same, but I can definitely tell them apart now. They are very similar, but Canadians have a slight twang that differentiates them from Americans. I was once watching Hoarders (terrible, I know) and I could easily tell when the people were in Canada or the US by the accent.
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Old 11-09-2014, 01:37 PM
 
21,573 posts, read 12,728,157 times
Reputation: 15919
Haaar! This thread reminds me of that terribly annoying pink bunny with the bass drum.

Geeez louise; it has gone through the genesis of at least twelve other threads and even been dragged down the "accent lane" between Canada and America.

Virtually all of that has been generated by one particular poster seemingly bent on keeping this stupid thread alive regardless. A poster who has yet to realize if proximity of cities to a border were a deciding factor; all of Ireland would have ceased to exist long ago. Toronto has a lake between it and the U.S. that is larger than Ireland for heaven's sake.

Last edited by BruSan; 11-09-2014 at 01:48 PM..
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Old 11-09-2014, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
16,011 posts, read 11,402,779 times
Reputation: 9845
Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Actually its funny - when I was in Morocco quite a few people had mistaken me for being for being British (My ancestry is Scottish so that is ok in terms of how I look of course) but they had mistaken me even after I was speaking to them in my 'Canamerican' accent.. I thought wow that is weird the accent is completely different from British like totally.. Point being is you may not detect the difference between a 'Canadian' accent and American but it is certainly there. As soon as I cross the border from Canada to Buffalo which is only 120 km from Toronto I instantly notice a difference. The more familiar you would become with Canada and America the more you'd pick up on the differences... Even within Canada you can detect differences - listen to a native from Newfoundland
I was mistaken for being British once...only once LOL in San Francisco...a long time ago.
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