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View Poll Results: How politically correct are people in your country?
To a fault 30 68.18%
Not at all 14 31.82%
Voters: 44. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 09-15-2014, 12:21 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,761 posts, read 9,135,981 times
Reputation: 5152

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
French-speaking Canadians often get into trouble in this way given that we live in an extremely PC part of the world. In fact, compared to most countries in the world we are quite PC. But nowhere near the PC-ness of English Canadians and even to some degree, Americans.

This contrast often leads to stereotypes, assumptions and even prejudices on the part of other Canadians vis-à-vis French-speaking Canadians, who are often judged based on the Anglo-Canadians PC-meter, which is calibrated super-high.
And sometimes it's just that French Canadians are more ethnocentric then Anglos just don't care enough to be sensitive to the sensibilities of other cultures. For example, I recently helped host a national conference of pharmacy students in Vancouver, the opening night of which was marked by a sacred dances performed by an Aboriginal dance troop. The Quebec city delegation arrived in red face and gaudy plains Indian costumes because they thought it would be fun. They refused to change out of the costumes when they were approached and the grossly unaware and offensive nature of what they were doing was explained to them. They just didn't get it. The Montreal delegation, similarly, did not seem to get why heckling the Anglo-Quebecois English to French translator at a contest a few days later with charged anti-Anglo slogans (which made her cry) was not acceptable either. You know that I know that these are somewhat extreme examples, but I think that the historical perspective of French Canadians to view themselves as victims of colonialism, and English Canadians to feel sensitive because of their past as colonizers, has led to a situation where French Canadians can be remarkably oblivious and unapologetic to groups they have every responsibility to be sensitive towards. I guess what I'm saying, at the end of the day, is that I think political correctness is a bit of work, but that it's the responsibility of any member of a dominant group to have some self awareness and make at least a minimum of effort to act accordingly, even if it's a little work. If French Canadians have, because of historical circumstances, become less used to doing this, that is a flaw and quite frankly one they need to work on, not something to be celebrated about the culture at all.
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Old 09-15-2014, 06:28 AM
Status: "Wishing all the best of health!" (set 19 days ago)
 
36,047 posts, read 36,307,393 times
Reputation: 16869
In the USA, everything public needs to be politically correct. But when one is speaking with close friends, many people tend not to be politically correct.
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,813,771 times
Reputation: 4420
I think here that if someone is over 40 and has had a few beers, quite un PC by any measure. Young and educated folks won't let the slightest controversial remark slide through.
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Old 09-15-2014, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,340 posts, read 30,624,426 times
Reputation: 9882
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
And sometimes it's just that French Canadians are more ethnocentric then Anglos just don't care enough to be sensitive to the sensibilities of other cultures. For example, I recently helped host a national conference of pharmacy students in Vancouver, the opening night of which was marked by a sacred dances performed by an Aboriginal dance troop. The Quebec city delegation arrived in red face and gaudy plains Indian costumes because they thought it would be fun. They refused to change out of the costumes when they were approached and the grossly unaware and offensive nature of what they were doing was explained to them. They just didn't get it. The Montreal delegation, similarly, did not seem to get why heckling the Anglo-Quebecois English to French translator at a contest a few days later with charged anti-Anglo slogans (which made her cry) was not acceptable either. You know that I know that these are somewhat extreme examples, but I think that the historical perspective of French Canadians to view themselves as victims of colonialism, and English Canadians to feel sensitive because of their past as colonizers, has led to a situation where French Canadians can be remarkably oblivious and unapologetic to groups they have every responsibility to be sensitive towards. I guess what I'm saying, at the end of the day, is that I think political correctness is a bit of work, but that it's the responsibility of any member of a dominant group to have some self awareness and make at least a minimum of effort to act accordingly, even if it's a little work. If French Canadians have, because of historical circumstances, become less used to doing this, that is a flaw and quite frankly one they need to work on, not something to be celebrated about the culture at all.
I don't necessarily think that the (likely) alcohol-fuelled antics of a bunch of students should be taken as being indicative of a population segment of 8 million people, but it's true as I said that French Canadians tend to be less PC...

Sounds like they got under your skin!
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Old 09-15-2014, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,761 posts, read 9,135,981 times
Reputation: 5152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I don't necessarily think that the (likely) alcohol-fuelled antics of a bunch of students should be taken as being indicative of a population segment of 8 million people, but it's true as I said that French Canadians tend to be less PC...

Sounds like they got under your skin!
They did, and I did mention that I know this is an extreme example, certainly not representative of the culture as a whole, no doubt about that and I'd hate to imply otherwise. But it's just an example of how un-PC behaviour can be a pretty bad thing, and an example of why I think the higher bar of PCness in the Anglo culture (those students did nothing at all similar and behaved like the professionals in traning that they are) is not a flaw but a strength. But yeah, I was embarrassed, they were the worst representatives of my home province I could imagine, and their boorish behaviour refleted poorly on pharamcy students as a whole in front of the industry and bureaucratic authorities we would have hoped to have impressed. But that is quite beside the point.
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Old 09-17-2014, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,340 posts, read 30,624,426 times
Reputation: 9882
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
They did, and I did mention that I know this is an extreme example, certainly not representative of the culture as a whole, no doubt about that and I'd hate to imply otherwise. But it's just an example of how un-PC behaviour can be a pretty bad thing, and an example of why I think the higher bar of PCness in the Anglo culture (those students did nothing at all similar and behaved like the professionals in traning that they are) is not a flaw but a strength. But yeah, I was embarrassed, they were the worst representatives of my home province I could imagine, and their boorish behaviour refleted poorly on pharamcy students as a whole in front of the industry and bureaucratic authorities we would have hoped to have impressed. But that is quite beside the point.
I had an example of the non-PC nature of French Canadians just a few days ago at the office.

I went looking for a colleague of mine who is of Haitian origin. I will call him Pierre.

Anyway, as is typical for me I started talking "to" him a few metres before I arrived in his office.

Once I got there, I realized that he was not there and that a (white) IT guy was sitting at his desk working on his computer.

When I said "oh... sorry", the young lady (I will call her Josée) who works across the hall said "Oops, wrong colour there Acajack! Hahahaha!".

Now, Pierre and Josée are actually really close friends. Their families hang out together outside of the workplace.

But it struck me (having lived in other parts of Canada for much of my life), that that's something an English-speaking Canadian would NEVER say!
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:02 AM
 
261 posts, read 222,479 times
Reputation: 205
You linked to this post in another thread, Acajack, and since my answer fits better here than there I'll revive this thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I had an example of the non-PC nature of French Canadians just a few days ago at the office.

I went looking for a colleague of mine who is of Haitian origin. I will call him Pierre.

Anyway, as is typical for me I started talking "to" him a few metres before I arrived in his office.

Once I got there, I realized that he was not there and that a (white) IT guy was sitting at his desk working on his computer.

When I said "oh... sorry", the young lady (I will call her Josée) who works across the hall said "Oops, wrong colour there Acajack! Hahahaha!".
Honestly I don't feel there is anything impolite or bad about what Josée did here. To me it's perfectly correct. In fact, the idea that I shouldn't refer to a black person as "the black guy" because of some abstract reason (why exactly?) is ludicrous. (OK, that's not exactly what she did here, but it's similar, and I've heard of people refraining from mentioning somebody's race when describing them out of fear of being non-PC.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
You know that I know that these are somewhat extreme examples, but I think that the historical perspective of French Canadians to view themselves as victims of colonialism, and English Canadians to feel sensitive because of their past as colonizers, has led to a situation where French Canadians can be remarkably oblivious and unapologetic to groups they have every responsibility to be sensitive towards.
I just don't see this self-proclaimed sensitivity of English Canadians. Certainly not to francophones, and even toward First Nations (the PC term ) you see a lot of insensitivity and racism, both on the part of anglophones and francophones.

Toward francophones, well, I think almost no anglophone thinks they have some sort of responsibility as former "colonizers". Anyway it's true they weren't the actual colonizers (Britain was), and as anglophones always say, if francophones were kept backward it was the fault of the Catholic Church, not of anglo policies. (Partly true, of course, but not entirely.) It reminds me of the stereotypical attitude of white Americans toward black Americans. We live in a post-racial society, so any problems they have are entirely of their own doing and due to their problematic culture, not because of things that happened before my time and in which I had no hand. And in any case, we've got a black president now (or, we've had a French-Canadian prime minister back in 1896!) so it's obvious racism is dead!
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 78,601,295 times
Reputation: 36332
Blindly and hysterically. (USA)
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
23,572 posts, read 24,687,413 times
Reputation: 36609
Quote:
Originally Posted by lepillow View Post
Do you ever feel tired in their presence? Do you feel fatigued talking to them because everything has to be so perfectly embellished, and it has to please everyone?

What's the situation in your country like? I mean are people more inclined to being politically correct as a form of upbringing or do they speak their mind?

In my country, people are so politically correct, the meter reading crashes through the roof.
as an amateur, small town politician, I'm offended by the term politically correct

please start using the term Civic Affirmation from now on
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,340 posts, read 30,624,426 times
Reputation: 9882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Migratory Chicken View Post
You linked to this post in another thread, Acajack, and since my answer fits better here than there I'll revive this thread.


Honestly I don't feel there is anything impolite or bad about what Josée did here. To me it's perfectly correct. In fact, the idea that I shouldn't refer to a black person as "the black guy" because of some abstract reason (why exactly?) is ludicrous. (OK, that's not exactly what she did here, but it's similar, and I've heard of people refraining from mentioning somebody's race when describing them out of fear of being non-PC.)


I just don't see this self-proclaimed sensitivity of English Canadians. Certainly not to francophones, and even toward First Nations (the PC term ) you see a lot of insensitivity and racism, both on the part of anglophones and francophones.

Toward francophones, well, I think almost no anglophone thinks they have some sort of responsibility as former "colonizers". Anyway it's true they weren't the actual colonizers (Britain was), and as anglophones always say, if francophones were kept backward it was the fault of the Catholic Church, not of anglo policies. (Partly true, of course, but not entirely.) It reminds me of the stereotypical attitude of white Americans toward black Americans. We live in a post-racial society, so any problems they have are entirely of their own doing and due to their problematic culture, not because of things that happened before my time and in which I had no hand. And in any case, we've got a black president now (or, we've had a French-Canadian prime minister back in 1896!) so it's obvious racism is dead!
Aboriginals (especially on the Prairies) and French Canadians/Québécois (most anywhere in Anglo-Canada) are the two exceptions to the fairly strict Canadian PC rule - it is way more socially acceptable to say un-PC things about them than any other groups.
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