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Old 09-30-2014, 09:24 AM
 
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I don't think that Portuguese laws are different from Spanish and French laws.
You can marry according to whatever rite you may choose, and then you must register it at the Civil Register.
I don't think that Catholics have any preference as it would not be constitutional, in fact, hell would break loose if that was certain.
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Old 09-30-2014, 06:06 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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In the US it is given, or expected? That all religions Clergy, whether a Church, Synagogue or Mosque. They perform weddings licensed by the US state it is in. I understand up to 80% of weddings are by a religions representative. Of course, state representatives not Religious are available to those not religious. Canada also. But no 2 ceremonies or the religions one is merely a symbolic wedding in the governments eyes and a government one is alone legal, is necessary .
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:50 AM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,248,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miserere View Post
I don't think that Portuguese laws are different from Spanish and French laws.
You can marry according to whatever rite you may choose, and then you must register it at the Civil Register.
I don't think that Catholics have any preference as it would not be constitutional, in fact, hell would break loose if that was certain.
This Portuguese wedding advice site does not agree with what you think. Various other sites aimed mainly at Brits wishing to marry in Portugal seems to reflect this as well in regard to Church of England marriage rites. The R.C. church as been the state religion and then disestablished as such twice in the 20th century, which tends to muddy things....in matters religious, "all hell is breaking loose" is a very low temperature affair here.

I am certain that there is no registering an Anglican marriage after the fact here. You must have proof of a valid marriage ALREADY having been performed - either in the Portuguese registry or in your home country - before an Anglican marriage ceremony in Portugal. The Brits I have known of did a quicky civil thing in the U.K., and then came here for the religious blow-out, as this gave them the proper documents for an Anglican ceremony to be held.

Civil ceremony, religious ceremony and other religious ceremonies | Our Wedding in Portugal

Last edited by kevxu; 10-01-2014 at 06:08 AM..
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Old 10-01-2014, 06:16 AM
 
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Some US states practice "common law".
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Old 10-01-2014, 11:04 AM
 
1,470 posts, read 2,085,316 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
This Portuguese wedding advice site does not agree with what you think. Various other sites aimed mainly at Brits wishing to marry in Portugal seems to reflect this as well in regard to Church of England marriage rites. The R.C. church as been the state religion and then disestablished as such twice in the 20th century, which tends to muddy things....in matters religious, "all hell is breaking loose" is a very low temperature affair here.

I am certain that there is no registering an Anglican marriage after the fact here. You must have proof of a valid marriage ALREADY having been performed - either in the Portuguese registry or in your home country - before an Anglican marriage ceremony in Portugal. The Brits I have known of did a quicky civil thing in the U.K., and then came here for the religious blow-out, as this gave them the proper documents for an Anglican ceremony to be held.

Civil ceremony, religious ceremony and other religious ceremonies | Our Wedding in Portugal


You can register your marriage anywhere in the world and marry in Portugal, Spain and France according to any rite.

I bet that if you have money you can marry according to the RCC notwithstanding that you are divorced, you are not catholic, your children are not christened and you live in sin and all those atavic stupidities.

If RCC priests were more commercial, they could make more money. I don't know why gays can't have a Catholic Wedding, why not?

As to RCC as the State Religion.... I would vote for it, but then you'll have them heathens complaining..just joking.

As many famous do here, you can register your marriage in Spain and marry in Brazil, Polynesia or Las Vegas. The Elvis Wedding is popular here.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Zagreb, Croatia
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Here one can get married in church or in the city hall, both equally valid.

In communism, of course, it wasn't like that - people back then would have two ceremonies, one religious, one civil.
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Old 10-01-2014, 08:34 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
45,983 posts, read 53,659,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
In the US it is given, or expected? That all religions Clergy, whether a Church, Synagogue or Mosque. They perform weddings licensed by the US state it is in. I understand up to 80% of weddings are by a religions representative. Of course, state representatives not Religious are available to those not religious. Canada also. But no 2 ceremonies or the religions one is merely a symbolic wedding in the governments eyes and a government one is alone legal, is necessary .
here's the state of Massachusets:

Public Records: Procedure to Perform (Solemnize)

The state secretary may authorize, subject to such conditions as he may determine, the solemnization of any specified marriage anywhere in the Commonwealth by the following non-resident clergy members: a minister of the gospel, a commissioned cantor or duly ordained rabbi, authorized representative of a Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is, the Imam of the Orthodox Islamic religion, a duly ordained priest or minister of the Buddhist Religion, a minister in fellowship with the Unitarian Universalist Association, a leader of an Ethical Cultural Union, a justice of the court or a justice of the peace, … in a regular and special meeting … of a Friends or Quaker monthly meeting.
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Old 10-01-2014, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
here's the state of Massachusets:

Public Records: Procedure to Perform (Solemnize)

The state secretary may authorize, subject to such conditions as he may determine, the solemnization of any specified marriage anywhere in the Commonwealth by the following non-resident clergy members: a minister of the gospel, a commissioned cantor or duly ordained rabbi, authorized representative of a Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is, the Imam of the Orthodox Islamic religion, a duly ordained priest or minister of the Buddhist Religion, a minister in fellowship with the Unitarian Universalist Association, a leader of an Ethical Cultural Union, a justice of the court or a justice of the peace, … in a regular and special meeting … of a Friends or Quaker monthly meeting.
Odd that they innumerate the specific religions whose clergy are allowed to marry. It seems like a bad idea as it's likely to overlook certain groups. For example, it says an Imam of the Orthodox Islamic religion. Does that mean people from related sects are excluded, like Ismailis, Druzes and Yazidis? And how are Hindus or Sikhs to be married? They don't seem to be accounted for.
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Old 10-02-2014, 01:35 AM
 
13,496 posts, read 18,248,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miserere View Post
You can register your marriage anywhere in the world and marry in Portugal, Spain and France according to any rite.
Yes, this is the case in Portugal, as is pointed out repeatedly in the links I posted. That was not in question

What I understood you not to find credible was that you cannot get married in an Anglican, etc. church in Portugal unless you have been married BEFORE in a ceremony in another country or in a civil ceremony in Portugal and can prove it with documentation.

If you are R.C. you can get married in an R.C. church by presenting the proper documents to the church authorities, and that marriage does not require a prior civil ceremony or marriage outside the country.

There are two entirely different ways of treating religious marriages.

Quote:

I bet that if you have money you can marry according to the RCC notwithstanding that you are divorced, you are not catholic, your children are not christened and you live in sin and all those atavic stupidities.
Perhaps in some places, but it did not work in the town where I live for a Portuguese friend of mine. One of her witnesses, a Portuguese, was not a baptized Catholic and the priest refused to allow him to be a witness. The problem was solved by the man simply going through the baptism ritual, which meant nothing to him.
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Old 10-02-2014, 07:36 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
45,983 posts, read 53,659,825 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Odd that they innumerate the specific religions whose clergy are allowed to marry. It seems like a bad idea as it's likely to overlook certain groups. For example, it says an Imam of the Orthodox Islamic religion. Does that mean people from related sects are excluded, like Ismailis, Druzes and Yazidis? And how are Hindus or Sikhs to be married? They don't seem to be accounted for.
Yea, that's odd. I realized afterwards that's only for out-of-state clerics. No denomination is specified for in-state clerics, though they need to register with the state to be eligible. I assume the registration and being part of a recognized organization is to stop cult leaders or others just claiming to be a priest.
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