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Old 09-29-2014, 04:18 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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Should a Religious wedding by Clergy registered with the government as in North America, be a standard in the EU too? Where for example, a Church wedding is not a valid wedding. But merely symbolic, and has no government recognition? Or Governments alone, should do valid weddings alone?
Does it matter if either can be?
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Old 09-29-2014, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Finland
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It is in many EU countries. In Finland for example. The priest is an agent of the state.

The EU is made of 28 countries with very different legislations.
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Old 09-29-2014, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Should a Religious wedding by Clergy registered with the government as in North America, be a standard in the EU too? Where for example, a Church wedding is not a valid wedding. But merely symbolic, and has no government recognition? Or Governments alone, should do valid weddings alone?
Does it matter if either can be?
In your country, are often two weddings conducted? What is the usual procedure for a couple that wants to be leagally married, and also wants to be married according to religious tradition?
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Old 09-29-2014, 05:44 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
In your country, are often two weddings conducted? What is the usual procedure for a couple that wants to be leagally married, and also wants to be married according to religious tradition?
Unless I am misunderstanding? No the US does not have any 2 ceremonies for marriages. Because virtually all religious institutions have clergy within it who merely need state accreditation. To perform a legal marriage. Perhaps you mean in Canada they have Two?

Last edited by steeps; 09-29-2014 at 06:38 PM..
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Old 09-29-2014, 06:23 PM
 
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in France, only the marriage at the City hall is official but nothing forbid you to have a religious ceremony.
So many marriages have two ceremonies, one official and one religious.
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Old 09-29-2014, 08:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
in France, only the marriage at the City hall is official but nothing forbid you to have a religious ceremony.
So many marriages have two ceremonies, one official and one religious.
It's the same in Germany too.

In the US a church wedding conducted by a licensed clergyman results in a legal marriage.

Some Americans get married at the city hall and then have a church wedding later, but not because the church wedding isn't legal. It would be just because they want to be married immediately and put off the church wedding until later for reasons that could be financial, etc.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:34 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steeps View Post
Unless I am misunderstanding? No the US does not have any 2 ceremonies for marriages. Because virtually all religious institutions have clergy within it who merely need state accreditation. To perform a legal marriage. Perhaps you mean in Canada they have Two?
No, in Canada marriages performed by registered clergy are recognized, as in the US. I thought you were from one of these EU countries where religious marriages were not recognized. I had not before heard that any European countries had such a law and was asking because I wanted to find out more about how that worked in practice, so I could form an opinion about whether I thought it was a good setup. Do you know which countries this is the situation in, or do you have any links to info? It's hard to get a handle on what I think about these laws without more detailed information about how things work. Are they mostly former Eastern Bloc states?
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Old 09-29-2014, 11:39 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong / Vienna
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Here you usually go to the "Standesamt", where your marriage is "performed" by someone from the city government. A week later or so you'll (or won't) have a religious wedding. Then you're also bound by whatever tacky religious laws your religion applies (Catholic canon law, shari'ah, ...) and that are not against the laws of the Republic.

I think we should keep marriages performed, recorded, and recognized by a government official.

Last edited by viribusunitis; 09-29-2014 at 11:49 PM..
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Old 09-30-2014, 08:56 AM
 
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In Spain as in France, all marriages must be registered at the Civil Registry...and if you marry in the City Hall you are registered directly.

You can have a religious marriage, but it has to be registered at the Civil Registry.
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Old 09-30-2014, 09:18 AM
 
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Portugal: I am a non-Portuguese citizen living in Portugal, and this is my broad understanding of the marriage law. You may have a civil ceremony with a registrar or you may have a marriage ceremony performed according to the rules of the Roman Catholic church. Both of these are valid marriages, providing the appropriate rules have been followed and the required documents provided.

No other religious marriages are recognized as valid, and adherents of other religions must have a civil ceremony in order to be considered to have entered into a legally recognized marriage. They may have a religious ceremony of their choice in addition to the civil marriage.

A couple living together in a consensual union for a period of two years are able to avail themselves of state services that apply to those persons who have been married in a civil or Roman Catholic ceremony.

This explanation comes to me from a Portuguese person, but I cannot vouch for its accuracy.
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