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Old 06-12-2015, 07:07 PM
 
349 posts, read 412,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
I agree with most of this but I dont see how Mexican culture is more exotic. The Philippines is a mix of native Austronesian, Chinese, Spanish, and American influences, with some Indian and Arab influences as well. Since you're Malaysian, imagine if Borneo had been taken over by the Spanish and then the Americans. That's essentially how the Philippines is. I'd say it's a pretty interesting mix, even if there aren't any ancient ruins. I will say, the enduring American influence makes it less interesting. You see American influence all over the world, so when you also see it all over the Philippines, it's just annoying. I don't want to go to a foreign country and hear American pop music everywhere
I guess from my perspective, since Meso-American culture isn't that well known. Like in LA Olvera Street or something has a lot of colourful masks and stuff and it just looks really exotic. The Philippines' seems to have lost more of it's culture compared to other parts of Asia, but being a Catholic Asian country makes it kind of interesting. Well my dad is Malaysian, and Malaysia really is a great mix of different Asian cultures in one country. Yes, globalisation is creeping up everywhere...Singapore is so globalised/westernised, you can find so many American chains there.
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Old 06-12-2015, 10:57 PM
 
3,308 posts, read 3,219,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoGeeks View Post
Definitely Mexico.

Pros for Mexico:

1. More exotic culture (native Aztec/Mayan mixed with Spanish).

- as a result more diverse and interesting architecture. Aztec and Mayan ruins as well as Spanish colonial architecture and modernist architecture.

2. More spectacular and diverse scenery (mountains, volcanoes, deserts, rainforests, beaches)

3. Better food - Filipino has the worst food in Asia

4. More interesting cities.


Pros for the Philippines.

1. Safer, but still dangerous by SEA standards.

2. Greater prevalence of English.

3. Closer to home and cheaper



I still plan to visit both, but Mexico definitely fascinates me/interests me a lot more. I know SEA a lot better than the Americans, and the Phils would attract me more for the novelty of an Asian Catholic country, beaches, wildlife, but you can get beaches and that in Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand too, though the Philippines is more natural than mainland SEA, and similar to Indonesia.
I love my Filipino people, but yeah, the food is not so great.

I was at a Filipino-American festival today with a Filipino friend. They were serving food(lumpia and pansit) and she didn't want any- said she does not like Filipino food. lol
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Old 06-12-2015, 11:02 PM
 
3,308 posts, read 3,219,901 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
The most well-known Filipino dishes that are most often sought after by overseas Filipinos are lechon (roast pig), kare-kare, crispy pata (fried pork leg) and sisig. The most well-known Filipino food that are sought after by a few but is popular to "shock" foreigners are balut (fertilized duck egg) and dinuguan (pig blood soup).

For everyday food, Filipinos eat fried chicken and lumpia a lot. Certainly both can easily be found in Taiwan. Lumpia is spring roll and if you speak Taiwanese, you know where it originated from.
I'm pretty open minded about food, but once I was at a Filipino baby shower and the pig blood soup freaked me out- it did not look good.

I also had balut at a farmer's market and really did not like it.

I keep trying to like the food, but it just isn't happening and I need to accept it. lol
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Old 06-12-2015, 11:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoGeeks View Post
Roasted pig is hardly unique Filipino...it's found throughout the Pacific, parts of Indonesia, and other parts of Asia. It's not just me, most everyone agrees it is the poor one out in terms of Asian cuisine. My friend recently went and said it was so bad they ate western food most of the time, and she's one to always try local cuisine. My parents said the same when they went, so there must be something to it.
I'm not saying overall Filipino food is good, but all I am saying that for someone who has not been to the Philippines and only sampled a few dishes, and declaring it the worst food in Asia is certainly an exaggeration.
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Old 06-13-2015, 01:59 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,789,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoGeeks View Post
I guess from my perspective, since Meso-American culture isn't that well known. Like in LA Olvera Street or something has a lot of colourful masks and stuff and it just looks really exotic. The Philippines' seems to have lost more of it's culture compared to other parts of Asia, but being a Catholic Asian country makes it kind of interesting. Well my dad is Malaysian, and Malaysia really is a great mix of different Asian cultures in one country. Yes, globalisation is creeping up everywhere...Singapore is so globalised/westernised, you can find so many American chains there.
I feel like Filipinos are holding onto their original culture more than Mexicans. I mean 99% of Filipinos still speak an indigenous language; only 6% of Mexicans do. But besides that, you mentioned masks and other exotic stuff. There's plenty of that in the Philippines.

This is from the largest and probably the oldest festival in the Philippines, the Ati-Atihan


Dinagyang festival


I will say, the costumes come mostly from creativity and imagination, but they commemorate the indigenous cultures.

There's also an indigenous peoples' festival every few years where tribal groups from all over the Philippines celebrate indigenous culture.

At around 3:25 in the video you can see all the different groups that participate and still hold on to their indigenous culture. And these are only a fraction of the indigenous groups in the Philippines

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DPjvhKNK88



There are still plenty of tribal people living in the Philippines. People who head-hunt. People who have tribal tattoos.



There's plenty of "exotic" left in the Philippines, you just have to go off the beaten path to see it

Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
I'm pretty open minded about food, but once I was at a Filipino baby shower and the pig blood soup freaked me out- it did not look good.

I also had balut at a farmer's market and really did not like it.

I keep trying to like the food, but it just isn't happening and I need to accept it. lol
I'm not accusing you of this, but I think a lot of people say "oh, Filipinos eat blood, how primitive" Yet they dont even realize that blood sausage and blood pudding are popular dishes all over Europe. When Filipinos do it, it's primitive, but when Europeans do it, it's somehow civilized. I think it's gross either way, but I had to rant.
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Old 06-13-2015, 03:26 AM
 
25,058 posts, read 25,536,663 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
That comment comes from someone who hasn't been to the Philippines, and refuses to acknowledge that things like lechon are Filipino dishes. He uses Jollibee (the Philippine equivalent of McDonald's or KFC, as it primarily serves hamburgers and fried chicken) as the basis for his contempt against Philippine cuisine. I am not saying Filipino food is better than Mexican food, especially if we are talking from the general American perspective, but I would certainly take what this guy says about Philippine cuisine with a grain of salt.
Lechón is definitely not a Filipino dish. Hell, just look at the word, lechón. It's Spanish. We have lechoneras in Puerto Rico and all over the Caribbean. Even the British have it, it's called a spit roast in Britain.
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Old 06-13-2015, 03:50 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,789,254 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Lechón is definitely not a Filipino dish. Hell, just look at the word, lechón. It's Spanish. We have lechoneras in Puerto Rico and all over the Caribbean. Even the British have it, it's called a spit roast in Britain.
Just because other groups eat it doesnt mean that it's not a Filipino dish also. If we're going on that logic then lumpia isn't a Filipino dish because all Asian groups eat spring rolls, pancit isn't a Filipino dish because lots of groups eat essentially the same thing, adobo isn't a Filipino dish because the Chamorros of Guam have the same dish. The 3 big Filipino dishes are not Filipino dishes according to you.
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Old 06-13-2015, 04:11 AM
 
1,143 posts, read 1,925,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
I'm pretty open minded about food, but once I was at a Filipino baby shower and the pig blood soup freaked me out- it did not look good.

I also had balut at a farmer's market and really did not like it.

I keep trying to like the food, but it just isn't happening and I need to accept it. lol
As mentioned earlier, both pig blood soup and balut are actually not that sought after by many Filipinos. Some Filipinos also either do not like eating them or, especially in the case of balut, refuse to even try it. Only a fraction of Filipinos like to eat balut on a regular basis.

Although pancit (noodles) and lumpia (spring roll or egg roll) are eaten on a regular basis by most Filipinos, and a lot consider them as "Filipino", these dishes are of Chinese origin and most recipes of pancit (especially pancit Canton) and lumpia do not have anything uniquely Filipino in them. They can taste similar to various noodle dishes or spring roll dishes all over Asia. Pancit palabok is a bit more Filipino, but I haven't had any good pancit palabok outside of the Philippines. A lot of Filipino restaurants outside the Philippines are not really that great. In the San Francisco Bay Area, there are only a handful of Filipino restaurants even if there are so many Filipinos and I would rate only less than half of them decent.

One quintessential Filipino dish is adobo, but there are a lot of variations to it. I don't exactly know the reason why most restaurants do not have adobo in their menu. Maybe it is so common as a daily dish that it began to feel too mundane to serve in Filipino restaurants. But the home-cooked adobo of overseas Filipinos are better than most dishes of Philippine restaurants overseas. This is just my opinion.
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Old 06-13-2015, 04:22 AM
 
1,143 posts, read 1,925,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Lechón is definitely not a Filipino dish. Hell, just look at the word, lechón. It's Spanish. We have lechoneras in Puerto Rico and all over the Caribbean. Even the British have it, it's called a spit roast in Britain.
It is Filipino. Roast pig that is roasted in Puerto Rico, of course is Puerto Rican and not Filipino. They of course will not taste the same, because in the Philippines alone, those roasted in a different province taste different from those roasted elsewhere. So what if they're the same name. It is logic like this that some Filipinos will start to serve balut and dinuguan to foreigners because they are more "unique" but then they will then say Filipino food is digusting
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Old 06-13-2015, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in Southern Italy
2,986 posts, read 2,439,133 times
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Mexico all the way, interesting culture especially in a few regions like Yucatan, it seems a mix of European and indigenous cultures, you can visit both colonial towns and precolombian sites and you aren't far from the jungle or from stunning beaches

I haven't tried any of these cuisines, they are hard to get in Italy even though there are many Filipinos immigrants in the larger cities
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