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Old 06-13-2015, 09:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
It is Filipino. Roast pig that is roasted in Puerto Rico, of course is Puerto Rican and not Filipino. They of course will not taste the same, because in the Philippines alone, those roasted in a different province taste different from those roasted elsewhere. So what if they're the same name. It is logic like this that some Filipinos will start to serve balut and dinuguan to foreigners because they are more "unique" but then they will then say Filipino food is digusting
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smtchll View Post
Just because other groups eat it doesnt mean that it's not a Filipino dish also. If we're going on that logic then lumpia isn't a Filipino dish because all Asian groups eat spring rolls, pancit isn't a Filipino dish because lots of groups eat essentially the same thing, adobo isn't a Filipino dish because the Chamorros of Guam have the same dish. The 3 big Filipino dishes are not Filipino dishes according to you.
Apparently you two don't know what x dish means in English. X dish means that it CAME from that country. They eat roast pig in the Philippines, it doesn't make it a Filipino dish. So, it is incorrect to call it Filipino when other countries had it first. Now, if Filipinos something special to it that is unique to Filipinos then you can call it Filipino.
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Old 06-13-2015, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Canada
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There are quite a few Pinoy restaurants where I live. A lot of the food is like home style cooking, very rustic but its good, I like it.
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Old 06-13-2015, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Seattle
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Mexico by far. I love everything about Mexico. The food, culture, music, people, language. The Philippines I'm just not as familiar with.
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Old 06-13-2015, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
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I much prefer Ph though the Mexican cuisine is better.
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Old 06-13-2015, 02:51 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,669 posts, read 14,201,273 times
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Been to Mexico a couple of times and really enjoyed myself overall. I'm planning a beach vacation to the Philippines some time next year so I'll have to report back which one I like better. I eat Mexican food here regularly and of course I've eaten it in Mexico too and I really love it. I also went to a Filipino restaurant once and while the food wasn't bad, it just doesn't compare To Mexican which is one of my favorites.
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Old 06-13-2015, 03:01 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 9,784,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Apparently you two don't know what x dish means in English. X dish means that it CAME from that country. They eat roast pig in the Philippines, it doesn't make it a Filipino dish. So, it is incorrect to call it Filipino when other countries had it first. Now, if Filipinos something special to it that is unique to Filipinos then you can call it Filipino.
Of course Filipinos dont eat it the exact same way as other countries, so Filipino lechon is a Filipino dish. Filipino lumpia is a Filipino dish even though you can find lumpia in Indonesia and similar spring rolls all over Asia. If you use the rule that the dish had to originate in the Philippines to be considered Filipino cuisine, then Filipinos dont have much cuisine.
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Old 06-13-2015, 06:58 PM
 
1,143 posts, read 1,924,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Apparently you two don't know what x dish means in English. X dish means that it CAME from that country. They eat roast pig in the Philippines, it doesn't make it a Filipino dish. So, it is incorrect to call it Filipino when other countries had it first. Now, if Filipinos something special to it that is unique to Filipinos then you can call it Filipino.
If you insist that only dishes CAME from that country are to be called X dish, then there's only very few dishes that can be called American as most are of European origin, and places which have shorter history as an independent country like Singapore will have zero dishes. Is there any dish that is left to be called Puerto Rican? Most have something similar in other places in the Caribbean or Latin America anyway. Most often, even called by the same Spanish name. Something that is unique to Filipinos? Well, I am sure that lechon in the Philippines are roasted differently from that of Puerto Rico or elsewhere. Am I supposed to list out all ingredients and roasting time and such to have to call it different? The tradition predates that of Spanish colonial times. Despite its common name with that of Spanish colonies, it has more in common with that of Bali, which is not influenced by Spain. Most of the other islands became Muslim, which is the reason why roast pig is no longer served in the rest of Southeast Asia. Philippine lechon, despite its name, actually did not originate from Spain. Same with Philippine adobo, which despite its name, is of indigenous origin. If you so insist, lechon also has an alternative indigenous name, it is called "inasal" where it is most popular in the Philippines.
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Old 06-14-2015, 02:40 AM
 
349 posts, read 411,689 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
If you insist that only dishes CAME from that country are to be called X dish, then there's only very few dishes that can be called American as most are of European origin, and places which have shorter history as an independent country like Singapore will have zero dishes. Is there any dish that is left to be called Puerto Rican? Most have something similar in other places in the Caribbean or Latin America anyway. Most often, even called by the same Spanish name. Something that is unique to Filipinos? Well, I am sure that lechon in the Philippines are roasted differently from that of Puerto Rico or elsewhere. Am I supposed to list out all ingredients and roasting time and such to have to call it different? The tradition predates that of Spanish colonial times. Despite its common name with that of Spanish colonies, it has more in common with that of Bali, which is not influenced by Spain. Most of the other islands became Muslim, which is the reason why roast pig is no longer served in the rest of Southeast Asia. Philippine lechon, despite its name, actually did not originate from Spain. Same with Philippine adobo, which despite its name, is of indigenous origin. If you so insist, lechon also has an alternative indigenous name, it is called "inasal" where it is most popular in the Philippines.
Singapore has zero dishes? lol. You're obviously not familiar with Singaporean cuisine. I'll lump Singapore and Malaysia as one country for culinary purposes and list some unique dishes...sure some aren't totally unique to Malaysia, but many were spread to other countries, while Malaysia did take some on:

Hainanese Chicken rice: Despite the name it does not come from Hainan in China (though it might've been based on a Hainanese dish) and was invented in Singapore by Hainanese chefs. Also common in Thailand.

Curry laksa: Uniquely Singaporean/Malaysian.

Assam laksa: Also unique, but similar to Thai tom yam (which the Thais took).

Satay/sate: Probably from Indonesia and via the Middle East.

Hor fun: Chinese influenced by uniquely Malaysian/Singaporean.

Beef rendang: I'd consider it uniquely Malay since it's northwest Sumatran/Malay, which is kind of the same ethnic region.

Ice kacang: self-explanatory

Curry mee: A unique Malaysian creation, blend of Chinese/Indian/Malay influences.

Nasi lemak: Coconut rice with curry chicken, egg, peanuts wrapped in pandan leaf. Uniquely Malaysian/Singaporean.

Nyonya chicken curry and chicken kapitan: Unique to the Peranakan cuisine of Malaysia.


And I could go on. None of these have exact equivalents in other countries like those Filipino dishes. Just face it, the Philippines cuisine is lacklustre compared to Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, even Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar are superior.
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Old 06-14-2015, 02:42 AM
 
349 posts, read 411,689 times
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^ In some ways, yes, Filipinos have kept some things that Mexicans have not. The difference is that the Phils wasn't a settler colony like Mexico. Most Mexicans have significant Spanish and other European ancestry, while most Filipinos do not. None of the Asian colonies were settler colonies like the Americas, Australia.etc. Still, due to being more tribal they didn't have the more ancient cultures of Indochina or Burma.
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Old 06-14-2015, 03:11 AM
 
1,143 posts, read 1,924,055 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoGeeks View Post
Singapore has zero dishes? lol. You're obviously not familiar with Singaporean cuisine. I'll lump Singapore and Malaysia as one country for culinary purposes and list some unique dishes...sure some aren't totally unique to Malaysia, but many were spread to other countries, while Malaysia did take some on:

Hainanese Chicken rice: Despite the name it does not come from Hainan in China (though it might've been based on a Hainanese dish) and was invented in Singapore by Hainanese chefs. Also common in Thailand.

Curry laksa: Uniquely Singaporean/Malaysian.

Assam laksa: Also unique, but similar to Thai tom yam (which the Thais took).

Satay/sate: Probably from Indonesia and via the Middle East.

Hor fun: Chinese influenced by uniquely Malaysian/Singaporean.

Beef rendang: I'd consider it uniquely Malay since it's northwest Sumatran/Malay, which is kind of the same ethnic region.

Ice kacang: self-explanatory

Curry mee: A unique Malaysian creation, blend of Chinese/Indian/Malay influences.

Nasi lemak: Coconut rice with curry chicken, egg, peanuts wrapped in pandan leaf. Uniquely Malaysian/Singaporean.

Nyonya chicken curry and chicken kapitan: Unique to the Peranakan cuisine of Malaysia.


And I could go on. None of these have exact equivalents in other countries like those Filipino dishes. Just face it, the Philippines cuisine is lacklustre compared to Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, even Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar are superior.
I know all those dishes and have tried almost all of them. But if you use theunbrainwashed's logic, most of those dishes originated in Malaysia and up to this time, both Singapore and Malaysia still have basically the same cuisine. So by his logic, not mine, most of these are only Malaysian dishes, not Singaporean; rendang is Indonesian, hor fun is actually Chinese (the name has not changed and the dish in China is still called hor fun), etc.

Did I even insist that Philippine cuisine is superior in any way here? I am just saying that you cannot declare it the worst if you don't know much about it, the same way I am not going to say that Mongolian or Bangladeshi cuisine are the worst in Asia because I haven't been to either countries. I, for one, do not like Indian food, and that is the worse for me compared to Filipino food. Having visited two cities in India and various Indian restaurants in several countries, I just do not like it. So for me, that is worse than Filipino food. I am sure many do not agree with me, but that is my preference and I am not writing in message boards saying Indian food is the worst in Asia because I haven't been to all countries in Asia. There are 100 million Filipinos and I am sure if just based on numbers alone, Filipino food cannot be voted worse than Mongolian food.
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