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Old 12-09-2014, 12:05 AM
 
14,767 posts, read 17,111,231 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard1098 View Post
This is one Brit's perspective on the Australian accent and dialect: Becoming fluent in 'Australian' - Telegraph


So if we thought they spoke English in Australia, we were not quite right. Conversing with the locals is a tantalising mix of understanding, being thrown a curve-ball and quickly Googling a meaning. It is not necessarily a language we'd heard before, but one we're getting used to. But I've got to go now, I must prepare an avo for my brekkie, then try to catch the postie before I grab my cossie, as I can't go swimming in the nuddie. No worries?!
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Old 12-09-2014, 05:14 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,416 posts, read 2,022,901 times
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^ And don't forget when making a statement, to make sure the innovation goes up at the end as if you're asking a question.
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Old 12-09-2014, 07:14 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,588 posts, read 27,384,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by modernist1 View Post
^ And don't forget when making a statement, to make sure the innovation goes up at the end as if you're asking a question.
Surely you mean "intonation?
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Old 12-09-2014, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Portsmouth, UK/Swanage, UK
2,173 posts, read 2,581,312 times
Reputation: 906
I think the American accent is mainly a mix of All the British accents and, most definitely, Irish, this also mixed with all the other accents around the world. The Canadian accent most certainly has a slight Scottishness no doot aboot it. Finally the Aussies and Kiwis most definitely have a more cockney sting to it, this mixed with other British accents... That's the mix up, and I don't think the American accent has diverted that far away from British accents considering many of the "white British and Irish" have been calling North America their home since like the 1600s during the good o' British rule!!.
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Old 12-09-2014, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Buena Park, Orange County, California
1,424 posts, read 2,487,719 times
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I don't think it is that drastic. I run into Brits and Australians all the time and never have a problem understanding them. Yeah, there are colloquialisms...but those happen by just travelling to different states. Then again, growing up in California you become accustom to a wide range of accents. Now for some of those southern backwoods (thinking Alabama here) accents in the states...I might actually need an interpreter. lol

Then there is this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03iwAY4KlIU
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Old 12-09-2014, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Portsmouth, UK/Swanage, UK
2,173 posts, read 2,581,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RudyOD View Post
I don't think it is that drastic. I run into Brits and Australians all the time and never have a problem understanding them. Yeah, there are colloquialisms...but those happen by just travelling to different states. Then again, growing up in California you become accustom to a wide range of accents. Now for some of those southern backwoods (thinking Alabama here) accents in the states...I might actually need an interpreter. lol

Then there is this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03iwAY4KlIU
Try this, might need to turn it up a little as the drama was from the early 80s or something... But I can genuinely understand those Alabama mountain people compared to these Geordie's (Newcastle accent)! HAHA


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZY4TT3VtR8o

Do any Americans, or anyone else for that matter, understand what the Dad and the kid are saying? Cus I shore hell don't!!!

Thought I'd show you this - Al Murray taking the mickey outa British accents that many can't understand: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EX98LGnvc1E

Last edited by Jas182; 12-09-2014 at 01:26 PM..
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Old 12-09-2014, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,348,018 times
Reputation: 39038
I could understand the Dad, but not the son. I got all of what the Dad said except for a few words and short phrases, The son sounded like he was speaking Danish. Like Danish, I can pick out a few words but most of it goes over my head :-)
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Old 12-09-2014, 11:58 PM
 
1,051 posts, read 1,741,368 times
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The US west coast valley accent is pretty similar to the way a lot of Aussies speak....
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Old 12-10-2014, 12:21 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,588 posts, read 27,384,877 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jas182 View Post
I think the American accent is mainly a mix of All the British accents and, most definitely, Irish, this also mixed with all the other accents around the world. The Canadian accent most certainly has a slight Scottishness no doot aboot it. Finally the Aussies and Kiwis most definitely have a more cockney sting to it, this mixed with other British accents... That's the mix up, and I don't think the American accent has diverted that far away from British accents considering many of the "white British and Irish" have been calling North America their home since like the 1600s during the good o' British rule!!.
Maybe it's my Californian ears but I've never heard a Canadian pronounce those words like that.
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Old 12-10-2014, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,222 posts, read 16,424,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Maybe it's my Californian ears but I've never heard a Canadian pronounce those words like that.
We don't. Newfies, yeah, they do, some of them. And folks from more remote areas of Northern Ontario. The rest of us, by a very large majority, do not.

I think some people from Europe don't really understand how large, and varied these two countries, and the people who live in them are.
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