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Old 01-29-2015, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong / Vienna
4,491 posts, read 6,353,291 times
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We have an east/west divide. Alpine culture in the west, the east is more influenced by the Pannonian Basin. Social democracy is stronger in the east, they drink/grow more wine than westerners, are less religious, ...
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Old 01-30-2015, 02:12 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
11,655 posts, read 12,991,470 times
Reputation: 6391
Generally, you can say Brisbane, Queensland (to the north) is more conservative as they tend to have thicker accents. But that's a huge generalization and mostly false.

I'd say we have cultural divisions WITHIN our cities rather. Some suburbs will be more conservative and 'backwards' than the others.

With Sydney, the more conservative (including homophobic) and religious suburbs will be found within the western reach of the metropolitan area. Whilst the inner city and the northwestern beach suburbs (such as the North Shore) are rather liberal.

Here is a rough, diagrammatic outlook that I made (it ain't perfect, but I tried my best):


I left out a good dose of the western portion of this map because nobody lives there (they're sporadic farms actually). I couldn't fit Campbelltown and Camden (to the south) - They'll be under red. Cronulla to the southeast coast is also not in view (south of Kurnell). It will be under orange and red (at parts) due to racism and 'white power' views it had 10 years ago (i.e. the Cronulla Riots). Notice the red border within the orange one to the north (The Hills District) - Yep, that's our very own 'bible belt'.

Key:

Green - Liberal, easygoing, tolerant (don't care whether you're gay, black or a Jew). Most of the gay community revolves around there.

Orange - Moderate in general. Discretion may be advised here and there (like PDA and homosexuality). Though I still wouldn't be worried living there as a gay or coloured person. Still a very safe zone.

Red - Conservative. Though mostly homophobic in that regard. They would have gender roles, some racist views (not to that extent though, but among themselves) and are usually very religious. Still not as conservative as portions of America's south though.

Dark red - Virtually like red, but much, much more homophobic. Muslim and traditional (Middle Eastern) Christians are the majority here. I lived in that zone; They tend to be nice and friendly people, but just don't be like "I'm gay" in a family and in-law gathering.

Now don't be scared coming here (I hope this diagram didn't put you off). Even our most homophobic suburbs are far more liberal than the typical homophobic countries (or cities) in the world. I live in one of the 'red zones' too and I have a good quality of life.
Attached Thumbnails
Countries with a divide similar to the South / North one of the USA?-untitled.jpg  

Last edited by Ethereal; 01-30-2015 at 02:26 AM..
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Old 01-30-2015, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Curitiba
213 posts, read 298,737 times
Reputation: 49
Brazil, Russia, Italy and China.
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Old 01-30-2015, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,554 posts, read 87,098,836 times
Reputation: 36644
Mexico. The US border area is totally different from the rest of Mexico, and very isolated from it by hundreds of miles of open desert. The culture is very different -- the music, the food, the social customs. About 20% of all Mexicans now live in the border states.
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Old 01-30-2015, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Curitiba
213 posts, read 298,737 times
Reputation: 49
^^

I dont think Mexico or any place in latinoamerica except Brazil... outside Brazil... maybe Argentina.
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Old 01-30-2015, 11:22 PM
 
14,767 posts, read 17,135,327 times
Reputation: 20659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theropod View Post
Generally, you can say Brisbane, Queensland (to the north) is more conservative as they tend to have thicker accents. But that's a huge generalization and mostly false.

I'd say we have cultural divisions WITHIN our cities rather. Some suburbs will be more conservative and 'backwards' than the others.

With Sydney, the more conservative (including homophobic) and religious suburbs will be found within the western reach of the metropolitan area. Whilst the inner city and the northwestern beach suburbs (such as the North Shore) are rather liberal.

Here is a rough, diagrammatic outlook that I made (it ain't perfect, but I tried my best):


I left out a good dose of the western portion of this map because nobody lives there (they're sporadic farms actually). I couldn't fit Campbelltown and Camden (to the south) - They'll be under red. Cronulla to the southeast coast is also not in view (south of Kurnell). It will be under orange and red (at parts) due to racism and 'white power' views it had 10 years ago (i.e. the Cronulla Riots). Notice the red border within the orange one to the north (The Hills District) - Yep, that's our very own 'bible belt'.

Key:

Green - Liberal, easygoing, tolerant (don't care whether you're gay, black or a Jew). Most of the gay community revolves around there.

Orange - Moderate in general. Discretion may be advised here and there (like PDA and homosexuality). Though I still wouldn't be worried living there as a gay or coloured person. Still a very safe zone.

Red - Conservative. Though mostly homophobic in that regard. They would have gender roles, some racist views (not to that extent though, but among themselves) and are usually very religious. Still not as conservative as portions of America's south though.

Dark red - Virtually like red, but much, much more homophobic. Muslim and traditional (Middle Eastern) Christians are the majority here. I lived in that zone; They tend to be nice and friendly people, but just don't be like "I'm gay" in a family and in-law gathering.

Now don't be scared coming here (I hope this diagram didn't put you off). Even our most homophobic suburbs are far more liberal than the typical homophobic countries (or cities) in the world. I live in one of the 'red zones' too and I have a good quality of life.
I'd say there certainly is a difference between north queensland and south, like Melbourne.

as for the diagram, other than being quite the generalisation..(I would say most people couldn't give a rats clacker where you're from, (did you really say coloured?!) or who you might kiss... ) but.. yeah thank god I live in the green section, .
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Old 01-31-2015, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
11,655 posts, read 12,991,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by artemis agrotera View Post
I'd say there certainly is a difference between north queensland and south, like Melbourne.

as for the diagram, other than being quite the generalisation..(I would say most people couldn't give a rats clacker where you're from, (did you really say coloured?!) or who you might kiss... ) but.. yeah thank god I live in the green section, .
There is a Bogan 'vibe' to the southwest (Camden) and southeast Sydney (Cronulla). Coloured folks might frighten some of them. Again, the some of them. We aren't that bad anyway. We're still very accepting in contrast to other nations. The diagram was being a little sensationalist, I admit.

And what do you mean by me saying who I might kiss? Yes, quite frankly, I'd get harsh looks and even vocal discrimination if I were to kiss another man in a red zone area. Of course, I'm not saying in front churches, mosques or temples, but in a romantic restaurant or a park, where people usually express their love there. I wouldn't be given a fair go.

Yes, the diagram is a generalization, but based on my personal accounts it is fairly accurate.

Oh, and about Melbourne, again, I do think there is a difference between their suburbs too. I haven't been there, but I'm aware about the fact that some of their suburbs or regions (like Sydney) have a high religious community whilst others are more irreligious.

Northern QLD, eastern WA, NT and SA are mostly rural and sparsely populated anyway. It will be hard judging them. I think Tasmania is more gay friendlier though?
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Old 01-31-2015, 06:50 AM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,454 posts, read 7,289,849 times
Reputation: 6127
Korea.....north and south...very different

Australia.....south = big cosmopolitan cities (Sydney & Melbourne) ....North = crocodile hunters/beaches

Germany....north = stern, hard working/industrial .... South = ompah band/polka/beer/catholic

Italy .....north = industrial/prosperous ... South = poorer/mafia

France ....north = more urban (Paris) ....South = more laid back/better climate/Riviera
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Old 01-31-2015, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Curitiba
213 posts, read 298,737 times
Reputation: 49
^^

Korea haha

South Germany no is most richest than north?
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Old 01-31-2015, 11:51 PM
 
14,767 posts, read 17,135,327 times
Reputation: 20659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theropod View Post
There is a Bogan 'vibe' to the southwest (Camden) and southeast Sydney (Cronulla). Coloured folks might frighten some of them. Again, the some of them. We aren't that bad anyway. We're still very accepting in contrast to other nations. The diagram was being a little sensationalist, I admit.
yes, it was.

Quote:
And what do you mean by me saying who I might kiss? Yes, quite frankly, I'd get harsh looks and even vocal discrimination if I were to kiss another man in a red zone area. Of course, I'm not saying in front churches, mosques or temples, but in a romantic restaurant or a park, where people usually express their love there. I wouldn't be given a fair go.
you're in suburbia. I'd probably get weird looks if I started pashing on in those areas too.

Quote:

Yes, the diagram is a generalization, but based on my personal accounts it is fairly accurate.
They are your anecdotes. That doesn't mean that it is accurate.

Quote:
Oh, and about Melbourne, again, I do think there is a difference between their suburbs too. I haven't been there, but I'm aware about the fact that some of their suburbs or regions (like Sydney) have a high religious community whilst others are more irreligious.

Northern QLD, eastern WA, NT and SA are mostly rural and sparsely populated anyway. It will be hard judging them. I think Tasmania is more gay friendlier though?
Not aware of any very religious areas in Melbourne, and I lived there most of my life, and am there every 8 weeks or so...

Tasmania, I am not sure I have not spent enough time there.
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