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View Poll Results: Which has better natural scenery, California or Italy?
California 147 54.44%
Italy 123 45.56%
Voters: 270. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-09-2015, 09:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
^^^Win!
The Redwoods are gorgeous. My stepmother's brother owns a home there and it is like living in a magical forest, I was in shock when I stepped out onto his deck.

I have traveled all over CA, and the more I explore, the more I appreciate its beauty. Even though I have seen many beautiful places in many countries (including the Black Forest in Germany, Swiss Alps, etc...), Yosemite is still one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen IMO.
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Old 07-09-2015, 11:35 PM
AFP
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
Very beautiful, though it does look alot like the beaches in Baja California Sur

https://www.google.com/search?q=baja...7c4ERwwNFhM%3A

Tehnically that counts as California, har har.
It does a little drier though nice cactus.
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Old 07-09-2015, 11:43 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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California is more beautiful to me but who cares? people take these polls too seriously, its not a competition! California and Italy is all on one planet, we can all visit and enjoy both.
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Old 07-10-2015, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in Southern Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Traveler View Post
Where do you consider great area of ugliness in Italy? I went over half the country and didn't see it. I've been all over California top to bottom and across and they definitely have some very ugly areas as well as some of the most beautiful areas.
The Po Valley (except the Venice Lagoon and the Po Delta), the Tavoliere delle Puglie and the surrounding of cities like Taranto (due to steelworks all over the place), Rome (due to suburbia) and Naples (there are areas north of Naples which were massive abusive dumps where the land and rthe sea were poisoned for years)
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Old 07-10-2015, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in Southern Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yn0hTnA View Post
What areas of California would you say are ugly? Are you conflating the ugly suburban-sprawl of the state with the natural scenery, which is indeed beautiful?



Don't you think the Sierra Nevada range of California is fantastic as well?

Only the eastern areas of Southern California would be dry enough to actually be considered desert; much of Southern California falls under the Med climate regime, although a drier version of the regime than that which occurs in the Med Basin.

The beaches of California look the exact same as those on the Med; the only thing that could possibly make the beaches of Italy better is probably the warmer water, but that's is. Both Italy and California beaches have similar sand and water color.

You have forests of redwoods in CA, the tallest trees on the planet, quite unique to California. You won't be seeing any of that in Italy.
Not sure about the beaches, is there anything in Southern California as spectacular as Sardinian beaches?

Cala Goloritze:


Spaiggia Budelli


Piscinas Dunes:


Anyway i won't vote because i have never been to California so i can't judge but couldn't find anything like this in terms of beaches

Last edited by improb; 07-10-2015 at 06:36 AM..
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Old 07-10-2015, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in Southern Italy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Iaskwhy View Post
The Western US has vastly less sprawling population than Europe does. It isn't even close.



http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/dow...PopDensity.pdf



http://sedac.ciesin.columbia.edu/dow...PopDensity.pdf

The population density of California is 95 people/sq km. The population density of Italy is 202 people/sq km.
California is less dense but that doesn't mean that its cities aren't more sprawling. American cities usually take way more space than European cities. For example the Naples Metropolitan Area (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naples_metropolitan_area) has 1,4 million more people than the San Diego Metropolitan Area (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Di...ty,_California) in 1/4th of the space.

Italy is denser only because there are many small towns and villages all over the country whereas California has large areas where there's literally nothing for miles
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Old 07-10-2015, 09:02 AM
 
Location: near Turin (Italy)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
Very beautiful, though it does look alot like the beaches in Baja California Sur

https://www.google.com/search?q=baja...7c4ERwwNFhM%3A

Tehnically that counts as California, har har.
Beautiful place!

Anyway, I'm not so good with North America geography and history, but that peninsula is part of Mexico, am I right?
Does the "mexican part of California" count in this poll?

Quote:
Originally Posted by improb View Post
California is less dense but that doesn't mean that its cities aren't more sprawling. American cities usually take way more space than European cities. For example the Naples Metropolitan Area (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naples_metropolitan_area) has 1,4 million more people than the San Diego Metropolitan Area (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Di...ty,_California) in 1/4th of the space.

Italy is denser only because there are many small towns and villages all over the country whereas California has large areas where there's literally nothing for miles
To give the idea of what "many small towns and villages all over the country" means, I've found that Italy has 8,047 comuni = municipalities, with an average population of 7,345 people. The 70.5% of our "comuni" have less than 5,000 inhabitants, the 6.3% has an higher population than 20,000, and just 141 cities have more than 50,000 inhabitants. (from https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comune...a)#Statistiche , freely translated by me )

For example my region, which is one of the regions with the higher "town fragmentation", has 1,206 towns, each one with is recognizable center. As a consequence, here the distance between two town is usually very short. For example my "village" (with less than 1000 inhabitants I can't call it town...) has 4 neighbor towns/villages, and the distance between our town centers are less than 5 Km. In practice we could move from a village to the other by foot (but we don't, we are too lazy )



Finally, I couldn't close a post without adding some new photos.
Today, here it is the "parco nazionale del Gran Paradiso", a beautiful mountain park just some valleys northerner than my place (this time is also completely on Italian soil, and it is not shared with France or Switzerland such as the Mount Blanc or the Mount Rosa) .
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gran_P..._National_Park
It is also famous for his fauna, and in particular for ibexes, chamois and the marmots.
https://www.google.be/search?q=parco...ed=0CAYQ_AUoAQ
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Old 07-10-2015, 09:23 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by improb View Post
California is less dense but that doesn't mean that its cities aren't more sprawling. American cities usually take way more space than European cities. For example the Naples Metropolitan Area (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naples_metropolitan_area) has 1,4 million more people than the San Diego Metropolitan Area (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Di...ty,_California) in 1/4th of the space.
US metropolitan areas follow county lines; which in the western US often encompass lots of uninhabited land. For developed land, use urban area not metropolitan area. The San Diego urban area is 1900 square km with 2.96 million people. Californian cities are less dense than Italian ones, but they still take a small percentage of California's land area and are more dense than typical American urban areas.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...es_urban_areas. Note larger cities such as San Francisco and Los Angeles have adjacent urban areas, so they are more sprawling than the glance at a table might suggest. Totaling up adjacent urban areas, the two biggest continuous urban areas in California are:

Los Angeles region: 15.56 million people in 7,100 square km
San Francisco region: 6.09 million people in 3,000 square km
San Diego region: 3.54 million people in 2,290 square km

In total, the three largest urban areas contain 65% of the state's population but 3% of the area. A large fraction of the area is undeveloped.
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Old 07-10-2015, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Rimini, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (44°0 N)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by improb View Post
The Po Valley (except the Venice Lagoon and the Po Delta), the Tavoliere delle Puglie and the surrounding of cities like Taranto (due to steelworks all over the place), Rome (due to suburbia) and Naples (there are areas north of Naples which were massive abusive dumps where the land and rthe sea were poisoned for years)
I disagree, the Po Valley has a lot of attractive natural areas and nice rural landscapes, which frame beautiful towns, historic villas, castles. There is much more than just the Venice lagoon and the Po Delta.
This is a common and annoying stereotype among many Italians, often associated to the fact it's foggy and grey, which is definetely not true.
Sprawl around cities, towns and main highways is ugly but this is valid for every part of Italy, many parts of central and southern regions are even worse despite their reputation for enchanting views.
The "historic" landscapes are all beautiful, the sprawl areas are ugly and unattractive everywhere.
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Old 07-11-2015, 10:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urania93 View Post
Beautiful place!

Anyway, I'm not so good with North America geography and history, but that peninsula is part of Mexico, am I right?
Does the "mexican part of California" count in this poll?




To give the idea of what "many small towns and villages all over the country" means, I've found that Italy has 8,047 comuni = municipalities, with an average population of 7,345 people. The 70.5% of our "comuni" have less than 5,000 inhabitants, the 6.3% has an higher population than 20,000, and just 141 cities have more than 50,000 inhabitants. (from [url]https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comune_(Italia)#Statistiche[/url] , freely translated by me )

For example my region, which is one of the regions with the higher "town fragmentation", has 1,206 towns, each one with is recognizable center. As a consequence, here the distance between two town is usually very short. For example my "village" (with less than 1000 inhabitants I can't call it town...) has 4 neighbor towns/villages, and the distance between our town centers are less than 5 Km. In practice we could move from a village to the other by foot (but we don't, we are too lazy )



Finally, I couldn't close a post without adding some new photos.
Today, here it is the "parco nazionale del Gran Paradiso", a beautiful mountain park just some valleys northerner than my place (this time is also completely on Italian soil, and it is not shared with France or Switzerland such as the Mount Blanc or the Mount Rosa) .
[url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gran_Paradiso_National_Park[/url]
It is also famous for his fauna, and in particular for ibexes, chamois and the marmots.
[url]https://www.google.be/search?q=parco+gran+paradiso&espv=2&biw=1242&bih=5 77&site=webhp&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=V9ufVaC XLeX4ywPK6qjYCA&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ[/url]
No, it was more of a joke. Though an interesting historical fact is that California's original name is " Alta California."

I actually have driven all the way down to the tip of the Baja California peninsula, the water and beaches really do look like these pictures. That is why when I saw the Italian pictures it reminded me of this area.

These are all spectacular places, I would like to visit someday.
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