Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-29-2016, 08:48 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,835 posts, read 12,136,216 times
Reputation: 9819

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
You really are oblivious, aren't you.

Try this scenario.

Jack & Mary paddled their canoe down the river to a breakfast potluck. They took zucchini bread. John & Marsha took sandwiches that were strips of bacon & scrambled eggs in biscuits. Others brought homemade cookies and the hosts provided french toast sprinkled with powdered sugar. John & Marsha arrived in their car. John had just polished the hood that morning. He had to wash off the bird hockey. When Jack & Mary got to their destination Mary was anxious to borrow the restroom.

There are landmines in that for a native speaker of British English. It's a disaster for someone who learned British English as a 2nd or 3rd language.
Im sorry but what exactly is that supposed to prove? Every word written there is used in British English (apart from Zucchini) what on earth makes you think that these are any different? There is just as much difference (if not more) between the English spoken in the North of the UK to the English spoken in the south of the UK yet its still the same language!! Or do you think we all speak like Chaucer this side of the pond?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:15 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,854,561 times
Reputation: 10257
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Im sorry but what exactly is that supposed to prove? Every word written there is used in British English (apart from Zucchini) what on earth makes you think that these are any different? There is just as much difference (if not more) between the English spoken in the North of the UK to the English spoken in the south of the UK yet its still the same language!! Or do you think we all speak like Chaucer this side of the pond?
Of course it's all the same.

That's why I had to listen to a man from Manchester rail about the stupidity of someone, the last time that he was in the US, & how he asked for a biscuit & was given what we call a biscuit & not what we call a cookie which is what he wanted. Bird hockey is a colloquial expression that isn't used throughout the US. Do you think that I don't know that what we call the hood of a car, you call the bonnet? Whether you know what a restroom is is irrelevant. It's a term that is highly confusing to people who don't speak English as a first language & the concept of borrowing the restroom doesn't compute. It's a shortcut for saying borrow the use of. To make it easily understood, it should be said that she had to use the toilet. Unless someone has had an extended stay in the US, for a non-native English speaker, what I wrote would be either confusing or incomprehensible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:23 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,835 posts, read 12,136,216 times
Reputation: 9819
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Of course it's all the same.

That's why I had to listen to a man from Manchester rail about the stupidity of someone, the last time that he was in the US, & how he asked for a biscuit was given what we call a biscuit & not what we call a cookie which is what he wanted. Bird hockey is a colloquial expression that isn't used throughout the US. Do you think that I don't know that what we call the hood of a car, you call the bonnet? Whether you know what a restroom is is irrelevant. It's a term that is highly confusing to people who don't used English as a first language & the concept of borrowing the restroom doesn't compute. It's a shortcut for saying borrow the use of. To make it easily understood, it should be said that she had to use the toilet. Unless someone has had an extended stay in the US, for a non-native English speaker, what I wrote would be either confusing or incomprehensible.

I'm sorry but most of what you have said is used both sides of the Atlantic and 'local slang' does not make it a 'different language', I can understand an American far more easily than somebody from Glasgow or even Newcastle, you don't hear the Scots claiming a language called 'Scottish English'. In fact due to the age of the UK there is a tremendous amount of local slang and as for the diversity of accents! People in Liverpool have a completely different accent to the people of Manchester even though the cities are only a few miles apart, yet it is all English. Because of my job I speak to people from all over the world, every day and always in English, I have never failed to understand anything my American, Australian or Irish colleagues have ever said to me, in fact I seem to be perfectly well understood by the Chinese, German or Italian contacts I have too, the reason? Because we all use the same language to communicate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:25 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,835 posts, read 12,136,216 times
Reputation: 9819
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
I'm sorry but most of what you have said is used both sides of the Atlantic and 'local slang' does not make it a 'different language', I can understand an American far more easily than somebody from Glasgow or even Newcastle, you don't hear the Scots claiming a language called 'Scottish English'. In fact due to the age of the UK there is a tremendous amount of local slang and as for the diversity of accents! People in Liverpool have a completely different accent to the people of Manchester even though the cities are only a few miles apart, yet it is all English. Because of my job I speak to people from all over the world, every day and always in English, I have never failed to understand anything my American, Australian or Irish colleagues have ever said to me, in fact I seem to be perfectly well understood by the Chinese, German or Italian contacts I have too, the reason? Because we all use the same language to communicate.

If somebody can translate what I said here into 'American English' so that I cant understand what is being said then please do try!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:35 AM
 
338 posts, read 336,657 times
Reputation: 162
There is one difference:

British: Would you like some tea good sir? I may have brought some.

American: Woudchliksumteh'gser? Ahmay hf brou'suuumnnn!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:43 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,854,561 times
Reputation: 10257
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
I'm sorry but most of what you have said is used both sides of the Atlantic and 'local slang' does not make it a 'different language', I can understand an American far more easily than somebody from Glasgow or even Newcastle, you don't hear the Scots claiming a language called 'Scottish English'. In fact due to the age of the UK there is a tremendous amount of local slang and as for the diversity of accents! People in Liverpool have a completely different accent to the people of Manchester even though the cities are only a few miles apart, yet it is all English. Because of my job I speak to people from all over the world, every day and always in English, I have never failed to understand anything my American, Australian or Irish colleagues have ever said to me, in fact I seem to be perfectly well understood by the Chinese, German or Italian contacts I have too, the reason? Because we all use the same language to communicate.
Apparently, you've never seen a language tree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:43 AM
 
14,449 posts, read 11,931,363 times
Reputation: 39486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahhammer View Post
There is one difference:

British: Would you like some tea good sir? I may have brought some.

American: Woudchliksumteh'gser? Ahmay hf brou'suuumnnn!!!
I've heard plenty of Brits who sound just like your phonetic "American" speaker. Rapid speech, slurring and poor enunciation is not exclusive to the USA.

And no American would say "good sir."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 09:56 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,854,561 times
Reputation: 10257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahhammer View Post
There is one difference:

British: Would you like some tea good sir? I may have brought some.

American: Woudchliksumteh'gser? Ahmay hf brou'suuumnnn!!!
No American would say that. Depending on region or formality it could be anywhere from Yo! (or Hey!) Wan' sum tea? It's pritty gud. to Woodja like sum tea, sir? It's pritty gud.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 04:02 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,854,561 times
Reputation: 10257
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
I'm sorry but most of what you have said is used both sides of the Atlantic and 'local slang' does not make it a 'different language', I can understand an American far more easily than somebody from Glasgow or even Newcastle, you don't hear the Scots claiming a language called 'Scottish English'. In fact due to the age of the UK there is a tremendous amount of local slang and as for the diversity of accents! People in Liverpool have a completely different accent to the people of Manchester even though the cities are only a few miles apart, yet it is all English. Because of my job I speak to people from all over the world, every day and always in English, I have never failed to understand anything my American, Australian or Irish colleagues have ever said to me, in fact I seem to be perfectly well understood by the Chinese, German or Italian contacts I have too, the reason? Because we all use the same language to communicate.
Actually, Scots is an acknowledged language. Scots language and alphabet

I believe that the original intent of this thread was referring to actual business dealings, where people may spend more than a day together. When you have a limited contact with individuals on a telephone & the main topic is business, you can't get into too much trouble, even if a few pleasantries are exchanged.

My father worked for a well known German company. The Germans who came over were fluent, & sometimes there was still confusion, until they got used to the language as spoken in the US. My father & others would sometimes be taking the Germans to visit customers for a week. Sometimes the Germans would come over & hold a week of meetings. I think that that was the intention of the thread, not can you talk to someone on the phone for 20 or 30 minutes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-29-2016, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,501,643 times
Reputation: 39045
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Of course it's all the same.

That's why I had to listen to a man from Manchester rail about the stupidity of someone, the last time that he was in the US, & how he asked for a biscuit & was given what we call a biscuit & not what we call a cookie which is what he wanted. Bird hockey is a colloquial expression that isn't used throughout the US.
I guess I am being swayed in this argument. The number of failed business deals, even international incidents over biscuits and bird hockey cannot be underestimated.

If the topic here is business, then we are really talking about business English. Rare idioms, colloquialisms, and folksy turns of phrase may trip up a Singaporean businessman in a bar, but in the boardroom, its all about dollars and cents... or pounds and pence.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top