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Old 03-30-2016, 12:14 AM
 
9 posts, read 11,565 times
Reputation: 25

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Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
There is no such thing as 'American English' this is just something Americans say to try and claim the language, there is also no such thing as 'Australian English', New Zealand English', 'Irish English' or even 'British English'! The language spoken by all of these countries inhabitants is practically identical!! There are only regional accents (if you think the English spoken between somebody from Newcastle and London is closer than that spoken by somebody from Boston or London you are VERY much mistaken) and a few local 'slang' words that differ, the language is the same.
Hmmm... "Oh, ****e! What if you're right!" Travel, and prove yourself wrong.
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Old 03-30-2016, 01:16 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,814 posts, read 34,706,106 times
Reputation: 10256
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
I guess I am being swayed in this argument. The number of failed business deals, even international incidents over biscuits and bird hockey cannot be underestimated.

If the topic here is business, then we are really talking about business English. Rare idioms, colloquialisms, and folksy turns of phrase may trip up a Singaporean businessman in a bar, but in the boardroom, its all about dollars and cents... or pounds and pence.
The topic is business. That can vary from brief, business-oriented phone calls, which should be fail-safe, to working with someone who's first language is not English. If you work for an international company and someone from management shows up, you might be chained to the hip with that individual for days. Getting a promotion could be tied to whether you care enough to communicate effectively with that person for a week at a time.

What happens if that person isn't your boss but a foreign national coworker who is transferred into your work group for a couple of years.

Does it matter what form of English the foreign language speaker learned? It sure does. I had a coworker who was born in Germany, in an area where she learned the British form of English. She told me that working in the US was like relearning English. She had to learn new spellings, new words, & sometimes new meanings on the fly.

I saw my father deal with various members of German management for decades, frequently one on one for days at a time, frequently up to a week. As the original poster suggested, how you deal with people can absolutely have an effect on whether you get that promotion.
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Old 03-30-2016, 04:30 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,820 posts, read 12,037,971 times
Reputation: 9813
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Actually, Scots is an acknowledged language. Scots language and alphabet

I believe that the original intent of this thread was referring to actual business dealings, where people may spend more than a day together. When you have a limited contact with individuals on a telephone & the main topic is business, you can't get into too much trouble, even if a few pleasantries are exchanged.

My father worked for a well known German company. The Germans who came over were fluent, & sometimes there was still confusion, until they got used to the language as spoken in the US. My father & others would sometimes be taking the Germans to visit customers for a week. Sometimes the Germans would come over & hold a week of meetings. I think that that was the intention of the thread, not can you talk to someone on the phone for 20 or 30 minutes.
Yes there is a Scottish language, but in modern day Scotland they speak English, they don't call it 'Scottish English' either! I have travelled, I have American friends, my ex wife was an au-pair when I met her believe me I have friends from MANY different nationalities, I work for the oil industry you should see the amount of different nationals that work in the same building as me alone! I deal with people from all over the world every day and the fact is the language that Americans speak is identical to the language I also use, there is NEVER any confusion about what is being said either between me or any American I have ever spoken too (and there have been many). You say 'you can't get in too much trouble' when only pleasantries are exchanged so I would like you to detail what kind of problems you think you will have speaking at length to an Englishman? Come to the UK, travel the country, you will NOT need a 'phrasebook' you will never be misunderstood, you WILL be speaking the same language as everybody else on the island (apart from some of the immigrants!) you will be speaking English not 'American'.


Again for anybody that hasn't understood my 'British English' post above please feel free to translate it into 'American English', lets see the difference exactly!?
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Old 03-30-2016, 09:44 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,814 posts, read 34,706,106 times
Reputation: 10256
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Yes there is a Scottish language, but in modern day Scotland they speak English, they don't call it 'Scottish English' either! I have travelled, I have American friends, my ex wife was an au-pair when I met her believe me I have friends from MANY different nationalities, I work for the oil industry you should see the amount of different nationals that work in the same building as me alone! I deal with people from all over the world every day and the fact is the language that Americans speak is identical to the language I also use, there is NEVER any confusion about what is being said either between me or any American I have ever spoken too (and there have been many). You say 'you can't get in too much trouble' when only pleasantries are exchanged so I would like you to detail what kind of problems you think you will have speaking at length to an Englishman? Come to the UK, travel the country, you will NOT need a 'phrasebook' you will never be misunderstood, you WILL be speaking the same language as everybody else on the island (apart from some of the immigrants!) you will be speaking English not 'American'.


Again for anybody that hasn't understood my 'British English' post above please feel free to translate it into 'American English', lets see the difference exactly!?


The topic isn't can two people who speak different forms of English adjust. As I said before, there are words that are vulgar in one form that are not vulgar in the other. When people realize that, they adjust. When Craig Ferguson was doing The Late Late Show, he did a bit on that, which was hilarious.

The object of this thread is whether native English speakers can lose out in business by not adjusting. You insist that there is no difference. That is simply untrue. There are differences in spellings, pronunciations, & meanings. Those differences are compounded for someone who speaks English as an auxiliary language. Ever have that conversation with some of those people who you insist are all speaking the same exact language? It doesn't sound like it to me.
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Old 03-30-2016, 09:17 PM
 
919 posts, read 840,912 times
Reputation: 373
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
This is nonsense, the written language is identical!!!! Please show examples if you can! and firs I want you to re-write exactly what you said here, first in this supposed 'American English' and then again but this time in this supposed 'British English'!! THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS AMERICAN ENGLISH! :-)
I can't find those papers anymore but you do have access to google.

What are the differences between British English and American English?
There are many British words which are different from American words.

For example:

A lorry is a slimmer truck.
A lift is an elevator.
A fortnight is two weeks.
A chemist is a person who works in a drugstore.
A dual carriageway is a freeway.

Want more?

Comparison of American and British English
Contents
1 Historical background
2 Grammar
2.1 Nouns
2.1.1 Formal and notional agreement
2.2 Verbs
2.2.1 Verb morphology
2.2.2 Use of tenses
2.2.3 Verbal auxiliaries
2.2.4 Transitivity
2.2.5 Complementation
2.3 Presence or absence of syntactic elements
2.3.1 Definite article
2.4 Prepositions and adverbs
2.4.1 Phrasal verbs
2.5 Miscellaneous grammatical differences
3 Word derivation and compounds
4 Vocabulary
4.1 Overview of lexical differences
4.1.1 Words and phrases that have their origins in BrE
4.1.2 Words and phrases that have their origins in AmE
4.1.3 Divergence
4.1.3.1 Words and phrases with different meanings
4.1.3.2 Other ambiguity (complex cases)
4.1.4 Frequency
4.2 Social and cultural differences
4.2.1 Education
4.2.1.1 School
4.2.1.2 University
4.2.1.3 General terms
4.2.2 Government and Politics
4.2.3 Business/Finance
4.2.4 Employment/Recruitment
4.2.5 Transport/Transportation
4.2.5.1 Road transport
4.2.5.2 Rail transport
4.2.6 Television
4.2.7 Telecommunications
4.2.8 Levels of buildings
4.3 Units and measurement
4.3.1 Numbers
4.3.2 Monetary amounts
4.3.3 Dates
4.3.4 Time
4.3.5 Mass
4.4 Mathematics
4.5 Holiday greetings
4.6 Idiosyncratic differences
4.6.1 Figures of speech
4.6.2 Equivalent idioms
5 Writing
5.1 Spelling
5.2 Punctuation
5.2.1 Full stops and periods in abbreviations
5.2.2 Restrictive and non-restrictive modifiers
5.2.3 Quoting
5.2.4 Parentheses/brackets
5.3 Titles and headlines
6 Keyboard layouts
I didn't know even keyboard layouts were different between the two.
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Old 03-30-2016, 09:46 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,814 posts, read 34,706,106 times
Reputation: 10256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
I can't find those papers anymore but you do have access to google.

What are the differences between British English and American English?
There are many British words which are different from American words.

For example:

A lorry is a slimmer truck.
A lift is an elevator.
A fortnight is two weeks.
A chemist is a person who works in a drugstore.
A dual carriageway is a freeway.

Want more?

Comparison of American and British English
Contents
1 Historical background
2 Grammar
2.1 Nouns
2.1.1 Formal and notional agreement
2.2 Verbs
2.2.1 Verb morphology
2.2.2 Use of tenses
2.2.3 Verbal auxiliaries
2.2.4 Transitivity
2.2.5 Complementation
2.3 Presence or absence of syntactic elements
2.3.1 Definite article
2.4 Prepositions and adverbs
2.4.1 Phrasal verbs
2.5 Miscellaneous grammatical differences
3 Word derivation and compounds
4 Vocabulary
4.1 Overview of lexical differences
4.1.1 Words and phrases that have their origins in BrE
4.1.2 Words and phrases that have their origins in AmE
4.1.3 Divergence
4.1.3.1 Words and phrases with different meanings
4.1.3.2 Other ambiguity (complex cases)
4.1.4 Frequency
4.2 Social and cultural differences
4.2.1 Education
4.2.1.1 School
4.2.1.2 University
4.2.1.3 General terms
4.2.2 Government and Politics
4.2.3 Business/Finance
4.2.4 Employment/Recruitment
4.2.5 Transport/Transportation
4.2.5.1 Road transport
4.2.5.2 Rail transport
4.2.6 Television
4.2.7 Telecommunications
4.2.8 Levels of buildings
4.3 Units and measurement
4.3.1 Numbers
4.3.2 Monetary amounts
4.3.3 Dates
4.3.4 Time
4.3.5 Mass
4.4 Mathematics
4.5 Holiday greetings
4.6 Idiosyncratic differences
4.6.1 Figures of speech
4.6.2 Equivalent idioms
5 Writing
5.1 Spelling
5.2 Punctuation
5.2.1 Full stops and periods in abbreviations
5.2.2 Restrictive and non-restrictive modifiers
5.2.3 Quoting
5.2.4 Parentheses/brackets
5.3 Titles and headlines
6 Keyboard layouts
I didn't know even keyboard layouts were different between the two.
I was going to post some British vs American websites but figured the poster wouldn't look & would continue with the belligerence. Churchill had a couple of great quips about the difference between the countries & the language thing.

What it boils down to is that not only are nonEnglish speaking people faced with differences in the language but social differences. For an English speaker to ignore this & assume that they will be understood is just asking to be misunderstood.
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Old 03-31-2016, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Metro Phoenix
11,039 posts, read 16,872,840 times
Reputation: 12950
The differences between American, English, and other forms of English and then their own sub-dialects mainly affects speech and not the written form. A guy with a thick Scottish accent and a girl with a heavy Boston accent may have a tough time understanding one another when speaking face to face, but would likely understand one another perfectly via written communication.

That's where i believe the big potential disadvantage for native speakers comes in... Some native speakers have only ever lived in areas with other native speakers and aren't used to communicating with non-natives may have difficulty. An Indian guy and a Chinese girl trying to communicate who have English as the common language between them may have a hard time with one another's acccents but are already used to having to slow down and decipher what's going on.
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Old 03-31-2016, 06:19 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,820 posts, read 12,037,971 times
Reputation: 9813
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post


The topic isn't can two people who speak different forms of English adjust. As I said before, there are words that are vulgar in one form that are not vulgar in the other. When people realize that, they adjust. When Craig Ferguson was doing The Late Late Show, he did a bit on that, which was hilarious.

The object of this thread is whether native English speakers can lose out in business by not adjusting. You insist that there is no difference. That is simply untrue. There are differences in spellings, pronunciations, & meanings. Those differences are compounded for someone who speaks English as an auxiliary language. Ever have that conversation with some of those people who you insist are all speaking the same exact language? It doesn't sound like it to me.
Please give me an example of how somebody would 'miss out on business' because they are from Boston instead of Kent? I'm sorry, the nature of my business means I speak to people from across the globe on a daily basis, always in my native tongue too and I have never been misunderstood by fellow English speakers from other English speaking countries and I have never suffered problems with non English speakers because I don't speak the right kind of 'English'! Not ever, and I have been in the same job now since 2007.
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Old 03-31-2016, 06:23 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,820 posts, read 12,037,971 times
Reputation: 9813
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
I can't find those papers anymore but you do have access to google.

What are the differences between British English and American English?
There are many British words which are different from American words.

For example:

A lorry is a slimmer truck.
A lift is an elevator.
A fortnight is two weeks.
A chemist is a person who works in a drugstore.
A dual carriageway is a freeway.
Want more?

Comparison of American and British English
Contents
1 Historical background
2 Grammar
2.1 Nouns
2.1.1 Formal and notional agreement
2.2 Verbs
2.2.1 Verb morphology
2.2.2 Use of tenses
2.2.3 Verbal auxiliaries
2.2.4 Transitivity
2.2.5 Complementation
2.3 Presence or absence of syntactic elements
2.3.1 Definite article
2.4 Prepositions and adverbs
2.4.1 Phrasal verbs
2.5 Miscellaneous grammatical differences
3 Word derivation and compounds
4 Vocabulary
4.1 Overview of lexical differences
4.1.1 Words and phrases that have their origins in BrE
4.1.2 Words and phrases that have their origins in AmE
4.1.3 Divergence
4.1.3.1 Words and phrases with different meanings
4.1.3.2 Other ambiguity (complex cases)
4.1.4 Frequency
4.2 Social and cultural differences
4.2.1 Education
4.2.1.1 School
4.2.1.2 University
4.2.1.3 General terms
4.2.2 Government and Politics
4.2.3 Business/Finance
4.2.4 Employment/Recruitment
4.2.5 Transport/Transportation
4.2.5.1 Road transport
4.2.5.2 Rail transport
4.2.6 Television
4.2.7 Telecommunications
4.2.8 Levels of buildings
4.3 Units and measurement
4.3.1 Numbers
4.3.2 Monetary amounts
4.3.3 Dates
4.3.4 Time
4.3.5 Mass
4.4 Mathematics
4.5 Holiday greetings
4.6 Idiosyncratic differences
4.6.1 Figures of speech
4.6.2 Equivalent idioms
5 Writing
5.1 Spelling
5.2 Punctuation
5.2.1 Full stops and periods in abbreviations
5.2.2 Restrictive and non-restrictive modifiers
5.2.3 Quoting
5.2.4 Parentheses/brackets
5.3 Titles and headlines
6 Keyboard layouts
I didn't know even keyboard layouts were different between the two.
What you fail to understand is that 'truck' is an English word, in fact are you seriously suggesting that in England people don't use the word elevator or the phrase 'two weeks'! Its a bit like claiming the English wouldn't understand the word Soccer (English word) because in England they are more likely (but not exclusively) going to call it football. You haven't given any examples here of any 'American English' words, just English words!! Where is this 'American language' that I would fail to understand?
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Old 03-31-2016, 06:45 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
25,947 posts, read 24,759,378 times
Reputation: 9728
Well, English may be a lingua franca, but people should not forget that except for a few countries it will never be more than a foreign language, be it in Europe, in Asia or wherever. People learn English from 5th grade on usually, but it is a kind of official English that is useful for understanding newspapers etc. Those who really care about English might study literature etc. later on at college, but of course hardly anyone does because there are few jobs in that area. I know people who can read scientific literature in English, but can't have a normal conversation in English because most of what goes beyond mere objective content is missing. People in Asia or Europe don't care about the details of life etc. in Britain or the US or Australia, hence they don't know. When people have something subtle and meaningful to express, they will always prefer their native languages.

Another aspect is that there are different types of English to begin with. Indian English is quite different from American English and really a challenge. Indian call centers are infamous for a reason
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