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Old 04-01-2016, 09:16 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,857,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xander.xvii View Post
english has no dialects, it has accents, which is a completely different things.
roflmao!
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:22 AM
 
338 posts, read 336,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xander.XVII View Post
English has no dialects, it has accents, which is a completely different things.


"Fade teil thee zo lournagh, co Joane, zo knaggee?
Th' weithest all curcagh, wafur, an cornee.
Lidge w'ouse an a milagh, tis gaay an louthee:
Huck nigher; y'art scuddeen; fartoo zo hachee?

Well, gosp, c'hull be zeid; mot thee fartoo, an fade;
Ha deight ouse var gabble, tell ee zin go t'glade.
Ch'am a stouk, an a donel; wou'll leigh out ee dey.
Th' valler w'speen here, th' lass ee chourch-hey.

Yerstey w'had a baree, gist ing oor hoane,
Aar gentrize ware bibbern, aamzil cou no stoane.
Yith Muzleare had ba hole, t'was mee Tommeen,
At by mizluck was ee-pit t'drive in."

What ails you so melancholy, quoth John, so cross?
You seem all snappish, uneasy, and fretful.
Lie with us on the clover, 'tis fair and sheltered:
Come nearer; you're rubbing your back; why so ill tempered?

Well, gossip, it shall be said; you ask what ails me, & for what;
You have put us in talk, till the sun goes to set.
I am a fool, and a dunce; we'll idle out the day.
The more we spend here, the less in the churchyard.

Yesterday we had a goal, just in our hand.
Their gentry were quaking, themselves could not stand.
If Good-for-little had been buried, it had been my Tommy,
Who by misluck was placed to drive in.

Yola, a language extinct in the 19th century which is closely related to English.
It's meant to be read exactly as it is spelled, so "dreeve" for drive and "hoh-neh" for hand. "fah-deh" for "fade", "theeh" for thee.

If we admit there are no dialects, then by your definition Russian has no accents to begin with considering it is even more homogenous than English.
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:24 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,835 posts, read 12,138,656 times
Reputation: 9819
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Didn't say it was a separate language.
Then there really isn't such a thing as 'American English', this suggests a different language which is simply not the case, issues people may have with English are nothing to do with the words or the grammer, the biggest problems people (may) get with English would be because of accents, personally I never fail to understand our American, Canadian or Australian cousins, in fact I tend to understand all English accents but if I had to chose the one that catches me out from time to time it would have to be our friends from Glasgow for me, which when you consider is 100 closer to me than somebody from Sydney says it all really (I even have family from that way).
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:31 AM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,857,545 times
Reputation: 10257
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Then there really isn't such a thing as 'American English', this suggests a different language which is simply not the case, issues people may have with English are nothing to do with the words or the grammer, the biggest problems people (may) get with English would be because of accents, personally I never fail to understand our American, Canadian or Australian cousins, in fact I tend to understand all English accents but if I had to chose the one that catches me out from time to time it would have to be our friends from Glasgow for me, which when you consider is 100 closer to me than somebody from Sydney says it all really (I even have family from that way).
Then you won't mind telling me how many sports were mentioned in the sample of American English that I wrote up & which sports they were.
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Old 04-01-2016, 03:56 PM
 
Location: SE UK
14,835 posts, read 12,138,656 times
Reputation: 9819
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Then you won't mind telling me how many sports were mentioned in the sample of American English that I wrote up & which sports they were.
If you can tell me what post number you refer to, though I don't really see what sports terms has to do with English? Once I give you the answer you can tell me how many words used are 'American English' words and are not 'English' words.
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Old 04-01-2016, 04:22 PM
 
Location: SE UK
14,835 posts, read 12,138,656 times
Reputation: 9819
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Then you won't mind telling me how many sports were mentioned in the sample of American English that I wrote up & which sports they were.
Looking back I assume you mean Bills company day out at the Baseball (yes kids playing pick up basketball too). I can't see why you think what you have written isn't English?? Just about every word used is English, you know words invented by the English lol, why do you think I don't understand it?? Tell me which words are not English English words? Poptarts arguably is a word 'invented' in the US (if poptarts were invented there) but we have poptarts in the UK and they're called 'poptarts' so I can't see why that would be 'American English' instead of 'English English', there is an argument for the word ballparks perhaps? But we don't do baseball, if we did then wouldn't we have ballparks too? Ballpark we know that ball and park are English English and what the words represent so I wouldn't say that is some kind of new language word personally, everything else seems to be standard English words to me, hoops, that's English isn't it, personally I don't know much about basketball (its not popular here) but I'm sure the terms used in the basketball world here (somebody else will have to vouch for that). Really your post seems to me to be made up with English English words and I am surprised that you thought that for some reason I wouldn't be able to understand! For proof that there is 'American English' I want something in 'American English' with 'American English' words that aren't in reality English English words about American pastimes.
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Old 04-01-2016, 06:35 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,857,545 times
Reputation: 10257
Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Looking back I assume you mean Bills company day out at the Baseball (yes kids playing pick up basketball too). I can't see why you think what you have written isn't English?? Just about every word used is English, you know words invented by the English lol, why do you think I don't understand it?? Tell me which words are not English English words? Poptarts arguably is a word 'invented' in the US (if poptarts were invented there) but we have poptarts in the UK and they're called 'poptarts' so I can't see why that would be 'American English' instead of 'English English', there is an argument for the word ballparks perhaps? But we don't do baseball, if we did then wouldn't we have ballparks too? Ballpark we know that ball and park are English English and what the words represent so I wouldn't say that is some kind of new language word personally, everything else seems to be standard English words to me, hoops, that's English isn't it, personally I don't know much about basketball (its not popular here) but I'm sure the terms used in the basketball world here (somebody else will have to vouch for that). Really your post seems to me to be made up with English English words and I am surprised that you thought that for some reason I wouldn't be able to understand! For proof that there is 'American English' I want something in 'American English' with 'American English' words that aren't in reality English English words about American pastimes.

First off, American English & British English are the main dialects of the English language. I never said that American English is a separate language, no matter how many times you try to tell me that I think it.

If you had only been thorough , you would have noticed aluminum can which is both spelled & pronounced differently from aluminium.

We say apartment you say flat. We say subway, you say tube. I started off with okey dokie, a variant of OK which has passed into other languages. It started out as a campaign slogan for Martin VanBuren. It stood for Old Kinderhook but because of the way it was used in the campaign took on a meaning. so, you want a 100% American word that isn't a trademark, it's OK.
Again, American English & British English are 2 separate facets of one language. At Christmas your children get a visit from Father Christmas. In the US Santa Claus comes. Santa Claus is from the Dutch Sinter Klass who came to New Netherlands before it became NY. I don't know or care if you have coleslaw but that is also a linguistic remnant of New Netherlands, just like cookie. North American English has been separated for over 200 years. If there were not differences English would be a dead language like Latin. If some of the words have traveled across the ocean because of TV & films that's good. It doesn't negate that there are different sources & different societies creating the differences.
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Old 04-01-2016, 08:46 PM
 
919 posts, read 844,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Again for anybody that hasn't understood my 'British English' post above please feel free to translate it into 'American English', lets see the difference exactly!?
According to you, there is no such a thing called Indonesian language, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
Apparently, you've never seen a language tree.
And that is what easthome should learn. I guess easthome insists there is no King penguin or Emperor penguin. They are all penguins.
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:04 PM
 
Location: The place where the road & the sky collide
23,816 posts, read 34,857,545 times
Reputation: 10257
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yanagisawa View Post
According to you, there is no such a thing called Indonesian language, right?



And that is what easthome should learn. I guess easthome insists there is no King penguin or Emperor penguin. They are all penguins.


Honestly, it's like talking to a brick wall. Dialects aren't separate language, only Scots is considered separate, - until you get back to Dutch & Frisan.

There are language trees & trees of the English language.
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Old 04-02-2016, 08:57 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,835 posts, read 12,138,656 times
Reputation: 9819
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbound_295 View Post
First off, American English & British English are the main dialects of the English language. I never said that American English is a separate language, no matter how many times you try to tell me that I think it.

If you had only been thorough , you would have noticed aluminum can which is both spelled & pronounced differently from aluminium.

We say apartment you say flat. We say subway, you say tube. I started off with okey dokie, a variant of OK which has passed into other languages. It started out as a campaign slogan for Martin VanBuren. It stood for Old Kinderhook but because of the way it was used in the campaign took on a meaning. So, you want a 100% American word that isn't a trademark, it's OK.
Again, American English & British English are 2 separate facets of one language. At Christmas your children get a visit from Father Christmas. In the US Santa Claus comes. Santa Claus is from the Dutch Sinter Klass who came to New Netherlands before it became NY. I don't know or care if you have coleslaw but that is also a linguistic remnant of New Netherlands, just like cookie. North American English has been separated for over 200 years. If there were not differences English would be a dead language like Latin. If some of the words have traveled across the ocean because of TV & films that's good. It doesn't negate that there are different sources & different societies creating the differences.

We ALSO say apartment, we ALSO have subway, a subway means subterranean way ie underground, the tube IS a subway system that we happen to call the 'tube', it doesn't mean it isn't a subway (English word) and therefore we understand perfectly when you say subway (there are signs all over the country with subway written on them). Santa Claus is easily as common as father Christmas in the UK if not more so, OF COURSE WE HAVE COLESLAW lol, this is what I am saying, your post is full of English words that have their origins in England. To describe something big you could call it big, large, gigantic, enourmous, massive etc and although all the words are different they are all English words for the same thing. Every area (and not just countries) will have a preference for certain English words, but from what I see your posts are all in English (English words from England) and they all have English gramma (English gramma from England) this is why I can understand 100% everything that you post. There is no such thing as 'American English', American 'slang' perhaps but its still English words, its still English.
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