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Old 04-18-2016, 04:09 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 23,997,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Italian (x)lurker View Post
I meant Ca is empty on monuments, castles, historical city centers compared to Italy, of course
not she's empty of natural resources...
Ok, and on that note, I agree.
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Old 04-18-2016, 04:14 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 23,997,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by improb View Post
I remember there was a thread already and it didn't go well but i trust OP on keeping order not letting the thread be derailed

California's economy is brighter due to having heavily invested in the booming tech system, a growing population, economical focus shifting on the Pacific where most of the trade with East Asia is made, ecc. The weight of California within the USA should keep growing.

When it comes to entertainment, i'm not sure, on one hand California is considered the bulk of the American entertainment industry but on the other hand Italy has an interesting musical scene (especially when it comes to hip hop, folk, hardcore and even ska), brilliant filmaking (when it comes to comedies, Italy, France and UK are still a couple spans above USA) and theater scene and most of all vibrant cities such as Naples, Rome, Turin, Bologna, Genoa, Milan which despite their smaller size (relatively to Californian cities) offer all kinds of entertainment

As for political leaders, Brown and Renzi (i don't know much about the former but i tried to read a quickly sum of his political career) are both liberals and seem to hold similar political stances. I'm not sure Renzi will outlast this November though (he's said he'd step down were the Constitutional Referendum not to pass) whereas Brown has won four terms. For this reason i back Brown.

As for the public school system, i would take ours despite all its faults [i think the recent School Reform has rectified a few pressing problems establishing basically a system of rewards which promotes excellence and one of punishment for lack of competence as well as assigning a back up teacher whenever it's needed (sickness, incompetence, ecc.)] as enrolling into university is considerably cheaper and basically free for low income citizens and still fairly well organized (despite not being on California's level) and for the prominence of institutes over lyceums.
Schools, I think Italy has us beat actually. At one time, California's schools were number one in the US. Last I heard we were 47 out of 50

As far as Governor Brown goes, he's really turned the state around. After over a decade of debt, California now has been running a budget surplus for the last two or three years.
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Old 04-18-2016, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
13,850 posts, read 4,208,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Italian (x)lurker View Post
I meant Ca is empty on monuments, castles, historical city centers compared to Italy, of course
not she's empty of natural resources...
you're right but it's worth mentioning that some of the vineyard forts, hearts castle, Disney's castle, Hogwarts in Universal studios, and mock up Danish housing make California look pretty cool. But like you said, nothing compared to italy
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Old 04-18-2016, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Southern Italy
2,986 posts, read 2,335,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Schools, I think Italy has us beat actually. At one time, California's schools were number one in the US. Last I heard we were 47 out of 50

As far as Governor Brown goes, he's really turned the state around. After over a decade of debt, California now has been running a budget surplus for the last two or three years.
Brown it is then

Renzi's work has only been half positive, his main achievements have been a rather successful School Reform, prompted higher public spending, allowed civil unions and finally had the Parliament approve a semi-decent electoral law. On the other hand, his liberist economic policies are something i despise and that shouldn't belong in a party which adheres to the Socialdemocratic bloc in the European parliament and they aren't working either or if they are, they little effect.
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Old 04-18-2016, 04:51 PM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
8,067 posts, read 11,858,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post

California ... Italy ... economy

P.S. This thread is more for fun so don't take it too seriously

In my view, in terms of economy, what California and Italy have most in common is high taxes.

However, they offer differing ways out: in California legally, through municipal bonds; in Italy illegally, through Switzerland (but even that window is partially closed by now), tangenti (wide open), pizzo (not pizza, pizzo).


Of course historically there is no comparison in terms of depth and breadth: and logically Italy is a place you go to die, thinking of the past, while California is the place you invest, thinking of the future.


At any rate, there is a very interesting point about the pre-industrial European colonial history of California, as well as other places in what became the southwestern United States, but also Florida: why was the Spanish and their heirs' hold over these territories so tenuous, eventually losing them, and why the newly coined Americans so tenacious in capturing and settling them.

I see an analogy between monastic settlements in certain hinterlands of the Mediterranean, including southern Italy, and Eurasia, on the one hand, and the American homestead on the other.


Fascinating. But don't take it too seriously.

Last edited by bale002; 04-18-2016 at 05:09 PM..
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Old 04-18-2016, 06:54 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 23,997,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Winterfall8324 View Post
you're right but it's worth mentioning that some of the vineyard forts, hearts castle, Disney's castle, Hogwarts in Universal studios, and mock up Danish housing make California look pretty cool. But like you said, nothing compared to italy
There's the California Tower in San Diego's Balboa Park as well as UC Berkeley's Campanile which was either designed after an Italian building and/or designed by an Italian. Still nothing compared to Italy though.
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Old 04-18-2016, 07:38 PM
 
10,238 posts, read 8,549,671 times
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Italy and Cali have similar climates, but demo I think the NJ or the Northeast because of all the italians.
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Old 04-18-2016, 07:46 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 23,997,149 times
Reputation: 8833
Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
In my view, in terms of economy, what California and Italy have most in common is high taxes.

However, they offer differing ways out: in California legally, through municipal bonds; in Italy illegally, through Switzerland (but even that window is partially closed by now), tangenti (wide open), pizzo (not pizza, pizzo).


Of course historically there is no comparison in terms of depth and breadth: and logically Italy is a place you go to die, thinking of the past, while California is the place you invest, thinking of the future.


At any rate, there is a very interesting point about the pre-industrial European colonial history of California, as well as other places in what became the southwestern United States, but also Florida: why was the Spanish and their heirs' hold over these territories so tenuous, eventually losing them, and why the newly coined Americans so tenacious in capturing and settling them.

I see an analogy between monastic settlements in certain hinterlands of the Mediterranean, including southern Italy, and Eurasia, on the one hand, and the American homestead on the other.


Fascinating. But don't take it too seriously.
Mexico lost it's northern territories (the US southwest) due in part to distance and neglect. Many in the northern territories felt disconnected from the Mexican state. Only Texas was important to Mexico at that time but it also became important to the US, especially after white settlers poured in after the civil war. During this period, the US was on a quest to expand territory but Mexico wasn't willing to give it up so easily. Mexico also lost it's southern territories (now Central America) during this time.
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:34 PM
 
Location: In the heights
28,659 posts, read 27,858,734 times
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Would love to answer this if I'd ever spent any time in Italy. I've been all around California--how's Italy? Even better? And wouldn't the Iberian Peninsula be a better analogue to California?
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Earth
17,444 posts, read 25,513,792 times
Reputation: 7389
Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
In my view, in terms of economy, what California and Italy have most in common is high taxes.

However, they offer differing ways out: in California legally, through municipal bonds; in Italy illegally, through Switzerland (but even that window is partially closed by now), tangenti (wide open), pizzo (not pizza, pizzo).


Of course historically there is no comparison in terms of depth and breadth: and logically Italy is a place you go to die, thinking of the past, while California is the place you invest, thinking of the future.


At any rate, there is a very interesting point about the pre-industrial European colonial history of California, as well as other places in what became the southwestern United States, but also Florida: why was the Spanish and their heirs' hold over these territories so tenuous, eventually losing them, and why the newly coined Americans so tenacious in capturing and settling them.

I see an analogy between monastic settlements in certain hinterlands of the Mediterranean, including southern Italy, and Eurasia, on the one hand, and the American homestead on the other.


Fascinating. But don't take it too seriously.
Both have wealthy norths and poor souths
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