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Old 10-06-2016, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Great Britain
27,426 posts, read 13,666,065 times
Reputation: 19784

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eevee17 View Post
Let's be purest and speak German. That was the root language for the original "English" language.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Englis...to_Old_English
Except that there were four distinctly different dialects of old English and Old English is very very different to modern English.

Quote:

Old English was divided into four dialects: the Anglian dialects, Mercian and Northumbrian, and the Saxon dialects, Kentish and West Saxon.

Through the educational reforms of King Alfred in the ninth century and the influence of the kingdom of Wessex, the West Saxon dialect became the standard written variety.

The epic poem Beowulf is written in West Saxon, and the earliest English poem, Cædmon's Hymn, is written in Northumbrian.

Modern English developed mainly from Mercian, but the Scots language developed from Northumbrian. A few short inscriptions from the early period of Old English were written using a runic script.

By the sixth century, a Latin alphabet was adopted, written with half-uncial letterforms. It included the runic letters wynn <ƿ> and thorn <þ>, and the modified Latin letters eth <ð>, and ash <æ
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Old 10-06-2016, 02:04 PM
 
1,177 posts, read 1,138,036 times
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I'm messing with the OP.
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Old 10-06-2016, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
7,502 posts, read 6,321,788 times
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I just watched a history documentary that was about John Lackland and the possibility that he would have won against King Philip, basically telling that now England would rule over France, yet speaking old French like John and his brother Richard did.

If William had not conquered England back in the 11th century, you guys would still speak some kind of German anyway.
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Old 10-06-2016, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Southland, NZ
20 posts, read 15,503 times
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Interesting, and on a good path here. It's also why Americans can't measure properly - they stayed with what was current at the time, and the rest of the world moved in different ways. These things happen during big upheavals.

I also wonder about the influence of the very large German migration into the US during the 19th century. Every time I visit, the food and surnames all have familiar German elements about them, especially the sweet sweet pastry. Mmm pastry.
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Old 10-06-2016, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Great Britain
27,426 posts, read 13,666,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanrenewal View Post
Interesting, and on a good path here. It's also why Americans can't measure properly - they stayed with what was current at the time, and the rest of the world moved in different ways. These things happen during big upheavals.

I also wonder about the influence of the very large German migration into the US during the 19th century. Every time I visit, the food and surnames all have familiar German elements about them, especially the sweet sweet pastry. Mmm pastry.
LOL - The Americans have us Brits to blame again in terms of measurements.

Imperial Units - Wiki

Metric System - Wiki
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Old 10-06-2016, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,443,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eevee17 View Post
Let's be purest and speak German. That was the root language for the original "English" language.
Well technically that would be proto-West Germanic. If we could get Frisia, Schlesvig-Holstein, and the rest of the fishheads on board it's a go.

If not, I'd settle for Northumbrian. Screw that Wessex crap. "Ohhh, I'm Alfred. Look at me, I burnt my cakes!" Pathetic.
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Old 10-06-2016, 05:38 PM
 
4,792 posts, read 6,090,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanrenewal View Post
Interesting, and on a good path here. It's also why Americans can't measure properly - they stayed with what was current at the time, and the rest of the world moved in different ways. These things happen during big upheavals.

I also wonder about the influence of the very large German migration into the US during the 19th century. Every time I visit, the food and surnames all have familiar German elements about them, especially the sweet sweet pastry. Mmm pastry.
German is the largest ancestry in the Midwest. The Midwest sets the standard for American English. The Germans birthed English. Therefore, General American is the purest form of English

This is obviously a joke as General American has little to no German influence.
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Old 10-06-2016, 05:42 PM
 
14,402 posts, read 11,837,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eevee17 View Post
Let's be purest and speak German. That was the root language for the original "English" language.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Englis...to_Old_English
Well, sort of. Modern English and modern German have a common ancestor, as this chart shows. That does not mean English comes from German, but that both it and German are "Germanic" languages.
Attached Thumbnails
No, the English don't speak the "purest" form of English-germanic.png  
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Old 10-06-2016, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Southland, NZ
20 posts, read 15,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
German is the largest ancestry in the Midwest. The Midwest sets the standard for American English. The Germans birthed English. Therefore, General American is the purest form of English

This is obviously a joke as General American has little to no German influence.
Ooohhh I'm not sure. Some of the directness in speech (especially my Wisconsin friends) reminds me of German and Dutch friends here. Why fluff around when you can just be blunt, in few words? Then wonder why others take offense. Definitely German!
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Old 10-06-2016, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Southland, NZ
20 posts, read 15,503 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
LOL - The Americans have us Brits to blame again in terms of measurements.

Imperial Units - Wiki

Metric System - Wiki
Well think of spelling - what was current at the time is what the Americans generally kept, while the rest of the English world moved on.
Measurement is the same - we moved on, while the society built on a strong story of rebellion and "we can be by ourselves and make it" didn't see the need to.
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