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View Poll Results: Which Anglophone country do you consider "most diverse"?
Australia 5 8.93%
Canada 8 14.29%
Ireland 0 0%
New Zealand 0 0%
United Kingdom 4 7.14%
United States of America 39 69.64%
Voters: 56. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-03-2017, 10:23 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 24,001,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I think it's a bit illusory to think that this would have been possible in any meaningful way.

Many potential U.S. states had to wait until "anglos" became a majority or at least had effective control of things before being admitted to the union.

And... ever heard of John Dewey?
You're getting off track here. I was disputing your claim that states couldn't have other languages because you said "they cannot do what they want". Without going to deep into that, yes they can if the constitution doesn't forbid it. I don't think you understand how sovereign the states are.

Anyway, Hawaii is an officially bilingual state. Most things in Hawaii; places and wildlife for example are known by their Hawaiian names. If Puerto Rico decides to become a state, it too would be officially bilingual most likely. States like New Mexico and Louisiana have no official languages but if they ever do, they quite likely would become bilingual as well.
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Old 01-03-2017, 01:34 PM
 
3,308 posts, read 3,090,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Haha, you are the Mexican version of me almost. I don't speak AAVE and was a huge nerd too and still am.
I'm still a nerd! I love the library and still get excited about learning. I was thinking about taking an economics class this semester. How much nerdier can one be?
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Old 01-03-2017, 05:32 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
14,873 posts, read 19,021,758 times
Reputation: 9194
The USA is more racially diverse but not as culturally diverse.

Canada has two pretty distinct and sizable cultures plus it also has a large percentage of recent immigrants still a majorly white country though.
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Old 01-03-2017, 07:49 PM
 
1,134 posts, read 838,243 times
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New Zealand is also bilingual and with a slightly higher proportion of immigrants than Canada, while Australia has a significantly higher proportion of migrants and second generation.
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Old 01-03-2017, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
3,975 posts, read 5,983,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
New Zealand is also bilingual and with a slightly higher proportion of immigrants than Canada, while Australia has a significantly higher proportion of migrants and second generation.
I think being officially bilingual in the case of the above is more a recognition of minority cultures or historical languages. Canada has French, NZ has Maori, and Ireland has Gaelic.

NZ Is also a bit over 30% non white by the US definition. Which might surprise many who don't know much about the country.
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Old 01-03-2017, 08:07 PM
 
1,134 posts, read 838,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
I think being officially bilingual in the case of the above is more a recognition of minority cultures or historical languages. Canada has French, NZ has Maori, and Ireland has Gaelic.

NZ Is also a bit over 30% non white by the US definition. Which might surprise many who don't know much about the country.
The Maori population is large and culturally distinct though (probably more than English speaking and francophone Canadians), although not as much as Australia's ATSI population a lot of whom live traditional or semi traditional lifestyles.
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Old 01-03-2017, 08:14 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,588 posts, read 13,563,011 times
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USA easily wins this one. More diverse than the rest.
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,340 posts, read 30,624,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
You're getting off track here. I was disputing your claim that states couldn't have other languages because you said "they cannot do what they want". Without going to deep into that, yes they can if the constitution doesn't forbid it. I don't think you understand how sovereign the states are.

Anyway, Hawaii is an officially bilingual state. Most things in Hawaii; places and wildlife for example are known by their Hawaiian names. If Puerto Rico decides to become a state, it too would be officially bilingual most likely. States like New Mexico and Louisiana have no official languages but if they ever do, they quite likely would become bilingual as well.
We don't have the same definition of official bilingualism.
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:36 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,340 posts, read 30,624,426 times
Reputation: 9882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
The Maori population is large and culturally distinct though (probably more than English speaking and francophone Canadians), although not as much as Australia's ATSI population a lot of whom live traditional or semi traditional lifestyles.
Fundamentally this is quite true, although of course like most aboriginal groups in the new world the Maori have undergone a high level of acculturation and assimilation that has seriously affected the viability of their culture and lifestyle.
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Old 01-04-2017, 12:52 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,539 posts, read 24,001,399 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
We don't have the same definition of official bilingualism.
LOL Of course we don't. Yours it as the federal (national) level and the one I'm talking about is at state (subnational) level.
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