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Old 01-23-2017, 01:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
In what way? I know where I live it certainly doesn't seem the case. The names of streets, schools, cities and towns and even our institutions don't hint at anyone distancing themselves. I get the impression they wanted to create a new UK society in Canada. That doesn't mean over time Canada has set it's own course and own way of doing things.

Perhaps you are thinking of the US which did seem to turn it's back on " British " ways after the revolution, but not totally of course.
In Australia it manifested in a desire to create a society that was focussed on ensuring the rights and welfare of the ordinary working man and woman; that did away with the British class system, social attitudes and resulting inequalities. You can argue how successful that endeavour was, but you can see how it strongly influenced economic thinking and policies including foreign trade and the labor market, the political systems that were established, and social attitudes such as the often misunderstood / misrepresented "tall poppy syndrome" and an irreverence for authority and privilege.
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Old 01-23-2017, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,945 posts, read 38,307,297 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
In what way? I know where I live it certainly doesn't seem the case. The names of streets, schools, cities and towns and even our institutions don't hint at anyone distancing themselves. I get the impression they wanted to create a new UK society in Canada. That doesn't mean over time Canada has set it's own course and own way of doing things.

Perhaps you are thinking of the US which did seem to turn it's back on " British " ways after the revolution, but not totally of course.
Yes about Canada. Good post.


As for the U.S., I've always found that it's more British than most people realize.
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Old 01-23-2017, 05:48 PM
 
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British television series are often remade for the American market. Cultural differences is one major reason for this.
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Old 01-23-2017, 11:29 PM
 
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That happens a lot across all countries. If you want a show to be popular, it needs to the tailored to a market. The UK gets its own version of the Aussie TV show 'My Kitchen Rules', and NZ gets a domestic series of another Aussie TV show 'The Block'. Australia had its own edition of UK shows like "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?' and "Master Chef'.

But a program like "Real Housewives of Melbourne" seems to be popular in its original form overseas .....

Last edited by Bakery Hill; 01-23-2017 at 11:52 PM..
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Old 01-24-2017, 12:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
That happens a lot across all countries. If you want a show to be popular, it needs to the tailored to a market. The UK gets its own version of the Aussie TV show 'My Kitchen Rules', and NZ gets a domestic series of another Aussie TV show 'The Block'. Australia had its own edition of UK shows like "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?' and "Master Chef'.

But a program like "Real Housewives of Melbourne" seems to be popular in its original form overseas .....
I'm not talking about reality television.

The global success of reality television programming is due to the development of simple but clever concepts that resonate across cultures. The concept remains the same with relatively minor changes.

I'm talking about actual television series (e.g. dramas, comedies).

Kath and Kim wasn't remade for the Brits, and The Office wasn't remade for Australians and Kiwis.

However, both were remade for the American audience. I can provide other examples too.

Americans can't even understand people who speak the same language as them. They need many things to be Americanised.

Last edited by Fish & Chips; 01-24-2017 at 12:37 AM..
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Old 01-24-2017, 12:44 AM
 
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But reality TV is what people watch. Left field shows like 'Kath and Kim' or niche shows like 'Wentworth' (aired in NZ, Ireland, the US and UK) will always find a small audience across borders, but mainstream success?

In Aus, we got both versions of 'The Office'; they were actually very different shows despite the similar premise. The ABC aired the UK version for a season, while the US version ran for 6 or 7 years on another network.

Last edited by Bakery Hill; 01-24-2017 at 12:59 AM..
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Old 01-24-2017, 12:54 AM
 
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Australia is a multicultural society. Of course it can appreciate more than one version of something. Australia also likes Eurovision.

America doesn't have that mindset. They mainly stick to their own media. Many of them don't even know what Eurovision is.
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Old 01-24-2017, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fish & Chips View Post
Australia is a multicultural society. Of course it can appreciate more than one version of something. Australia also likes Eurovision.

America doesn't have that mindset. They mainly stick to their own media. Many of them don't even know what Eurovision is.
You are largely right, but there are exceptions like Harry Potter, James Bond, Mad Max where Americans consume stuff "as is" in the original format. Note that these are examples from the Anglosphere. But for most stuff of foreign origin, it's true that they will do American remakes of the original, and this includes Anglosphere stuff as well more often than not: the Office, Man About the House, Till Death do us part, Keep it in the family, Kath & Kim, etc. Plus tons of game shows and reality shows.
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Old 01-24-2017, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fish & Chips View Post
Australia is a multicultural society. Of course it can appreciate more than one version of something..

I don't think that's related to multiculturalism. It's more related to the fact that British culture has deep enough roots in Australia that it creates an "alternative pop culture mainstream" there. (Though I realize the British influence on Australia culture is fading.) Australians don't watch Brazilians telenovelas and French movies in significantly larger numbers than Americans do.


And regardless of political jargon (multicultural vs. melting pot), the U.S. is every bit as multicultural as Australia is, and the main reason there is little mainstream interest there in foreign TV and movies, and music in languages other than English, isn't related to the makeup of the population but rather that the Hollywood juggernaut makes it its business to squeeze everything else out. And only lets stuff in when it's had a hand in repackaging it for conditioned American tastes: City of Angels (Wings of Desire), the Millennium stuff from Sweden, Ugly Betty (Betty, la fea), It's Now or Never (O Sole Mio), My Way (Comme d'habitude), etc. I could go on and on.


Canada is also very multicultural and even renowned for that, but there isn't really a marked difference in consumption of Chinese movies or Arab dance music (outside of their specific ethnic markets) between Canada and the U.S.
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Old 01-24-2017, 12:37 PM
 
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Remaking TV drama and movies from other countries is a pretty common phenomenon globally. And the Brits do it too.

'The Bridge' is a Swedish-Danish crime show that used to be shown here on a free to air network. The Brits (in collaboration with the French) have produced a clone called 'The Tunnel'. If you're hoping find the Swedish show 'Wallander' on your program guide, you might instead find the British copy with the same name.

Last edited by Bakery Hill; 01-24-2017 at 12:50 PM..
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