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Old 01-21-2017, 02:13 PM
 
400 posts, read 423,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Part of it was Canada's Centenary was coming up in 1967. Looking towards the future and not the past. Montreal held the worlds fair that year. I was there !!

The 1960's overall was a time of forward thinking and excitement about the future.

I like tradition and all that, but I think changing the flag was a brilliant idea. I also think it's a nice looking flag at that....although really hard for me to draw when I was in elementary school. That maple leaf drove me nuts LOL
This.

The Quiet Revolution in Quebec was in full swing at the time too, so changing the flag was a bid to bind quebecers a little closer to a Canada that was willing to distance itself a little from its ties to monarchy. America post war had also taken over from Britain as Canada's major trading relationship so I guess the canadians of that era wanted to strike out on its own by making a statement with this flag change thing.
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Old 01-21-2017, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookyhere View Post
This.

The Quiet Revolution in Quebec was in full swing at the time too, so changing the flag was a bid to bind quebecers a little closer to a Canada that was willing to distance itself a little from its ties to monarchy. America post war had also taken over from Britain as Canada's major trading relationship so I guess the canadians of that era wanted to strike out on its own by making a statement with this flag change thing.
Yes. There were several factors involved that all came together to make the change. There was also opposition at the time.
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Old 01-21-2017, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lookyhere View Post
This.

The Quiet Revolution in Quebec was in full swing at the time too, so changing the flag was a bid to bind quebecers a little closer to a Canada that was willing to distance itself a little from its ties to monarchy. America post war had also taken over from Britain as Canada's major trading relationship so I guess the canadians of that era wanted to strike out on its own by making a statement with this flag change thing.
I think more so then distancing the country from the monarchy, it was distancing the country from empire and colonialism, which had been the basis of the country for pretty much its entire history. This was a period of global decolonization and the basis was keeping the conquered (French Canadians) from seeking to strike out on their own which would have been extremely disruptive when they were smack dab in the middle of a settler state. Looking to the past gave plenty of reasons for separatism, going for a new symbol of a future that could be gave hope that the country could become something, and be based around things, that would make continued unity a productive thing to do. I think it was prescient, the country survived that period of history intact despite the rocky times that did come. Australia and New Zealand never had that dynamic and so had far less incentive to change their flags. That, and the optimism and futurism of the 60's as well as the shift of focus away from Europe and towards our own continent after the war led to the change.

Interestingly, we had a discussion on this very topic in the Canada forum not long ago: https://www.city-data.com/forum/canad...heir-flag.html
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Old 01-21-2017, 06:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
I think more so then distancing the country from the monarchy, it was distancing the country from empire and colonialism, which had been the basis of the country for pretty much its entire history. This was a period of global decolonization and the basis was keeping the conquered (French Canadians) from seeking to strike out on their own which would have been extremely disruptive when they were smack dab in the middle of a settler state. Looking to the past gave plenty of reasons for separatism, going for a new symbol of a future that could be gave hope that the country could become something, and be based around things, that would make continued unity a productive thing to do. I think it was prescient, the country survived that period of history intact despite the rocky times that did come. Australia and New Zealand never had that dynamic and so had far less incentive to change their flags. That, and the optimism and futurism of the 60's as well as the shift of focus away from Europe and towards our own continent after the war led to the change.

Interestingly, we had a discussion on this very topic in the Canada forum not long ago: https://www.city-data.com/forum/canad...heir-flag.html

The dynamics of Canada and Australia were very different in other ways as well, during that era. There was certainly a mood of change sweeping through Australia in the 60s, but it was focussed more on social issues. That surfaced in the hippie and counter culture movements that grew to a peak in the early 1970s, and which are still visible today in some towns on the east coast . But more broadly it manifested itself in a sense of "its time to change the social order" that Labor tapped into for the 1972 federal election campaign.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqMCZBjvmD4


All of that of course was a counter current to where Australia was at as a nation in terms of its place in the world. While for Canada the 1960s were a time of peace, for Australia it was yet another, and not the last, decade of military involvement in Asian conflicts that started with the Korean was in the late 1940s and didn't end until the withdrawal of troops from Vietnam in the early 1970s. The 1960s was when Australia went “All the way with LBJ” (President Lyndon Baines Johnson) in South East Asia. Of coursed that fuelled debate over conscription of 18 year old men to be sent of to fight in the jungles of Asia.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTV80RYkDH0

Those two currents of course crossed and at time clashed quite violently: [vimeo]23139946[/vimeo]
https://vimeo.com/23139946

So at that time, changing the flag was not the most important item of anyone's agenda.
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Old 01-21-2017, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Doesn't Canada have a lot of French people? They probably weren't happy with the Union Jack, as it didn't represent them?
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Old 01-21-2017, 09:24 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Canada didn't keep the former flag because it didn't want the former flag, it wanted its own flag that plainly made the statement "Canada". Period. So Canada did what it wanted.

There were no factors between Canada, Australia and New Zealands' decisions about flags. Australia and New Zealand weren't relevant to Canada's decisions and any decisions Australia and New Zealand made about their own flags was not relevant to what Canada did, it was their own business.

.
All true but OTOH "we did it because we wanted to" doesn't make for a very fulsome discussion.
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Old 01-21-2017, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,106,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Doesn't Canada have a lot of French people? They probably weren't happy with the Union Jack, as it didn't represent them?
Yes, and that's been addressed further up the thread.
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Old 01-22-2017, 12:39 AM
 
Location: BC Canada
984 posts, read 1,317,465 times
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About one-quarter of Canada is French and Canada has 2 official languages, English and French.

Quebecers were not enamored with Britain or the Empire but Canadians have never had the close relationship to Britain as Australia or NZ and more importantly never really wanted it. Surprisingly Americans have more affection for Britain and her culture than Canadians do. For the vast majority of Canadians, Britain is a very good friend and ally but not really a family member. The ONLY reason Canada isn't a republic is because the US is. Canadians view themselves as more aligned with Northern Europe as a whole both culturally and socially.

As far as the Australia or NZ, they shouldn't use Canada as an example. We got rid of our flag because we wanted to. Our people, values, and history are different from Australia/NZ. You should do what you think is best for your countries not because another country did it so you feel compelled. Any debate about the issue in Aus/NZ should focus solely on your own beliefs and bringing Canada into the conversation is disingenuous.
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Old 01-22-2017, 12:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Doesn't Canada have a lot of French people? They probably weren't happy with the Union Jack, as it didn't represent them?
You underestimate the division between different groups in Australia's early history, notable the Irish Catholics and British. At the time they were marked by different cultures, different religions, centuries of hostile history and to a degree different languages. Those divisions played out in politics, and socially in the large health and education systems run by the (Irish) Catholic church. But today the we use the term Anglo-Celtic without a second thought. Unlike Canada those divides were never backed-up and reinforced by geography, state boundaries and language laws, so the melting pot started to work very early on. You can say the same for other non British groups in Australia.
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Old 01-22-2017, 01:10 AM
 
1,147 posts, read 719,942 times
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Canada has both the French influence and the United States to the south.
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