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Old 02-11-2017, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
There are more languages than Arabic spoken in the Middle East, quite a few actually. Also, more religions than Islam.

In Central America, Mayan is still spoken in Guatemala, Belize and Honduras. There are also Creole languages that are still prominent in many countries and you will meet people who speak them, I did in Costa Rica.

These connections the OP is trying to make are forced and arbitrary, as someone else mentioned.
Loads of different langues spoken and even when speaking Arabic they dont speak the same.... diffferent accents... expressions and stuff like that. If you hear someone from Egypt... Morocco and Syria spreak ..... very different and sometimes they dont fully understand each other.
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Old 02-11-2017, 04:56 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
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Default Maybe it'll be a wakeup call

Quote:
Originally Posted by southwest88
In C. America, Catholicism was the most prevalent (but there's always been a base of Native People's religions - probably more true now that Protestant missions are also visiting & establishing churches).s[/url]

Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
No. There is very little true protestantism in Central America. There are more evangelical churches and in those churches there is complete rejection of anything Native. The only central American country with any significant native culture is Guatemala.

...
See Pew: Religion in Latin America | Pew Research Center - Nov. 2014

"Latin America is home to more than 425 million Catholics – nearly 40% of the world’s total Catholic population – and the Roman Catholic Church now has a Latin American pope for the first time in its history. Yet identification with Catholicism has declined throughout the region, according to a major new Pew Research Center survey that examines religious affiliations, beliefs and practices in 18 countries and one U.S. territory (Puerto Rico) across Latin America and the Caribbean.




"Historical data suggest that for most of the 20th century, from 1900 through the 1960s, at least 90% of Latin America’s population was Catholic (See History of Religious Change). Today, the Pew Research survey shows, 69% of adults across the region identify as Catholic. In nearly every country surveyed, the Catholic Church has experienced net losses from religious switching, as many Latin Americans have joined evangelical Protestant churches or rejected organized religion altogether. For example, roughly one-in-four Nicaraguans, one-in-five Brazilians and one-in-seven Venezuelans are former Catholics.

"Overall, 84% of Latin American adults report that they were raised Catholic, 15 percentage points more than currently identify as Catholic. The pattern is reversed among Protestants and people who do not identify with any religion: While the Catholic Church has lost adherents through religious switching, both Protestant churches and the religiously unaffiliated population in the region have gained members. Just one-in-ten Latin Americans (9%) were raised in Protestant churches, but nearly one-in-five (19%) now describe themselves as Protestants. And while only 4% of Latin Americans were raised without a religious affiliation, twice as many (8%) are unaffiliated today."

(My emphasis - more @ the URL.)

Pew is an authority on religion in the New World. & their findings support my contention - the Roman Catholic Church is losing ground in the Americas. Note also the increase in religiously unaffiliated.
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Return2FL View Post
I don't agree with you often but when I do, I tend to do so strongly.
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:10 PM
 
3,282 posts, read 3,801,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klmrocks View Post
Loads of different langues spoken and even when speaking Arabic they dont speak the same.... diffferent accents... expressions and stuff like that. If you hear someone from Egypt... Morocco and Syria spreak ..... very different and sometimes they dont fully understand each other.
Yes, quite true.

Those who speak another language many times prefer it over Arabic, especially Chaldean Iraquis.
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Old 02-11-2017, 05:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Return2FL View Post
Definitely derived from Jamaican. I used to spend a fair amount of time in Limon and became friendly with many of the local fishermen and low level politicians. All of the blacks who I met said they were of Jamaican descent. Those who interacted with foreigners a lot spoke pretty good English, but those who were 3rd and 4th generation without much outside exposure spoke something that was just about unintelligible. Even their Spanish was pretty crappy.

The Caribbean Central American coast is fairly autonomous, especially in Nicaragua. Most of the cultures are quite removed from what you would find in the capitals. Some of my favorite travels were to this area.
Very interesting. I would like to return to that area and visit Nicaragua and Panama this time around.
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Old 02-12-2017, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I thought Guatemala had the highest population of evangelical Christians in Central America, right?
Yes it does, and also churches like Jehovas witness, Mormons and a bunch of other sects are very popular. Evangelical churches that dont really have main line Protestant affiliations are popular in Guatemala. When I think Protestant I think Presbyterian, Methodist, Lutheran, Anglican etc etc. These Churches (true Protestantism) have very little following Guatemala. What you see in Guatemala are fundamentalist evangelical sects that came there via the US. A lot of non denominational sects pop up all over the place. Evangelical churches are big business in Guatemala.
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Old 02-12-2017, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosa surf View Post
[/b]

I'm not sure about ES and Honduras, but in Costa Rica there are the Borucas who live in small regions close to the Panama border. I visited one of their communities and it was quite large and well organized. They still speak in their native tongue and it looks like their community is around 2,500 people.

I traveled throughout CR for a month, from the Nicaragua border to the Panama border. I visited many cities and small towns in pretty much every region. I also heard a Creole language being spoken in the Caribbean side. From what I heard it may be derived from Jamaican Creole.

This made me realize how diverse Costa Rica is and also that there are way more Native American groups than people account for in Central America.
Interesting, I always like hearing about these groups . Though I have to say, Costa Rica has a population of 4 million. 2,500 speakers of a native language is not really a significant number. I am sure we can find groups like this in every country in the hemisphere. Any native language that has less than 100,000 is pretty much on their death bed. With out governments throwing major resources at them, they wont survive. I think its great when we have these surviving groups that speak their native languages though. In the case of El Salvador I doubt there is anything like that, Anyone that speaks a Native language in El Salvador is probably over the age of 50, and the little Native language that does remain is laced heavily with Spanish words. It is only slightly better in Honduras. In North eastern Honduras you have people that speak Miskito language and you also have a good amount of people that speak Garifuna on the North coast. Garifuna is a langauge that belongs the Arawak language group from the Caribbean islands. Garifuna is also spoken in parts of Belize and Guatemala. I have yet to meet a Honduran Native that speaks Mayan or Lenca, those language are pretty much gone and the only Salvadoreans I have met that were fluent in Nahuat were senior citizens.

Guatemala has many speakers of several native langauges, but even in Guatemala all commerce, government business and education is conducted in Spanish. It is a shame that children of the larger Mayan communities are not taught in their language at school. They should be, at least partially IMO.
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Old 02-23-2017, 05:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Interesting, I always like hearing about these groups . Though I have to say, Costa Rica has a population of 4 million. 2,500 speakers of a native language is not really a significant number. I am sure we can find groups like this in every country in the hemisphere. Any native language that has less than 100,000 is pretty much on their death bed. With out governments throwing major resources at them, they wont survive. I think its great when we have these surviving groups that speak their native languages though. In the case of El Salvador I doubt there is anything like that, Anyone that speaks a Native language in El Salvador is probably over the age of 50, and the little Native language that does remain is laced heavily with Spanish words. It is only slightly better in Honduras. In North eastern Honduras you have people that speak Miskito language and you also have a good amount of people that speak Garifuna on the North coast. Garifuna is a langauge that belongs the Arawak language group from the Caribbean islands. Garifuna is also spoken in parts of Belize and Guatemala. I have yet to meet a Honduran Native that speaks Mayan or Lenca, those language are pretty much gone and the only Salvadoreans I have met that were fluent in Nahuat were senior citizens.

Guatemala has many speakers of several native langauges, but even in Guatemala all commerce, government business and education is conducted in Spanish. It is a shame that children of the larger Mayan communities are not taught in their language at school. They should be, at least partially IMO.
Children in Mayan communities are given bilingual education in primary school, they learn how to read and write in their native tongue and in Spanish. Also, local government officials in Mayan communities speak Mayan languages.

Languages status in Guatemala
https://www.ethnologue.com/country/GT/status

The number of individual languages listed for Guatemala is 27. Of these, 26 are living and 1 is extinct. Of the living languages, 24 are indigenous and 2 are non-indigenous. Furthermore, 10 are institutional, 9 are developing, 5 are in trouble, and 2 are dying.
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Old 02-23-2017, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yaxkan View Post
Children in Mayan communities are given bilingual education in primary school, they learn how to read and write in their native tongue and in Spanish.
Maybe in some places but definitely not everywhere. Beyond primary school this is probably not common at all.


There is more than 1 extinct language in Guatemala.
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Old 02-25-2017, 10:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Maybe in some places but definitely not everywhere. Beyond primary school this is probably not common at all.


There is more than 1 extinct language in Guatemala.
I think the Mayan language is spoken more than people realize. Many people who speak Native American languages hide it due to fear of racism. When here in the US, there is tremendous pressure to speak Spanish to communicate and fit under that forced 'Hispanic' umbrella. I can only imagine all of the layers of pressure they have to endure.

I think this is very sad, remnants of the brutalities of European colonization that haven't gone away. It's up to US to treasure these languages, promote the culture and not let them die off.

I visited a Mixteco community in the mountains of Oaxaca when I was in graduate school. There were some Americans studying archeology and anthropology who were learning Mixteco. When the kids heard them speak it, they were shocked and so happy. The teacher told us children don't want to speak their native tongues because of the pressure from society to 'fit in.
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