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Old 02-14-2017, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Seoul
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There are tons of Spanish speakers, so anyone in Texas, Cali, or just about any major city can get around with knowing just Spanish. People who only know Portuguese will be limited to Southern Florida, parts of New York, and maybe LA.
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Old 02-14-2017, 12:13 PM
 
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I get it that "aliens"(a US term, I used to be one), are frustrated with the visa process, but consider this: About 70 million tourists visit each year, more than the entire population of many countries, but more importantly, about 7 million apply for permanent residence, of which one million are granted. No other country experiences anything remotely like this. If the visa process was more relaxed, the number of illegals would likely jump from the current 11M+, creating an even greater backlash. My experience in the US has taught me that there is generally a reasonable, if debatable, policy reason underpinning most rules. YMMV.
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Old 02-14-2017, 12:34 PM
AFP
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
There are tons of Spanish speakers, so anyone in Texas, Cali, or just about any major city can get around with knowing just Spanish. People who only know Portuguese will be limited to Southern Florida, parts of New York, and maybe LA.
Very few in LA more in Silicon Valley, San Diego the Central Coast and the San Joaquin Valley but those that don't know any English are few and far between.


You are more likely to find old people that don't speak English in the Boston Metro area, New Bedford or Fall River Massachusetts.

Last edited by AFP; 02-14-2017 at 12:45 PM..
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Old 02-14-2017, 12:37 PM
 
263 posts, read 234,674 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBMD View Post
I get it that "aliens"(a US term, I used to be one), are frustrated with the visa process, but consider this: About 70 million tourists visit each year, more than the entire population of many countries, but more importantly, about 7 million apply for permanent residence, of which one million are granted. No other country experiences anything remotely like this. If the visa process was more relaxed, the number of illegals would likely jump from the current 11M+, creating an even greater backlash. My experience in the US has taught me that there is generally a reasonable, if debatable, policy reason underpinning most rules. YMMV.
Yes, however, the US is no longer a dream country it used to be. Just watch Michael Moore's movie "Where to invade next" and see how happy are people in Europe with more generous vacation, pay bonus, paid maternity and sick leave, more humane criminal justice system, better food served at school lunches, etc. Sure the movie is a bit biased, but it is relevant.

I rarely see Western Europeans coming here to work, for most part I see Indians and Chinese on H1B visas. Sometimes I meet Eastern Europeans who immigrated here. Sometimes I see British nationals moving here as internal transfers but they are a drop compared to an ocean.
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Old 02-14-2017, 01:04 PM
 
Location: United Kingdom
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Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
^That's not an excuse. Millions of Asians visit America annually and the length of the flight is easily over 12 hrs.

Besides it's not like Poland has a small population.
Yes, they have money to burn.
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Old 02-14-2017, 01:25 PM
 
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I am a US citizen and I resent the US tourist visa system.

As a citizen, I have had close relatives denied again and again for a tourist visa to come visit me. There is the thing about "prove you will return", but it is a fallacy that a person can prove they will do or not do something. For some countries, a person basically has to be very old, or have kids and a husband (who does not join them on the trip, not allowed or the visa will be denied) to get a visa issued.

Then I see all the uproar over the executive order, but think to myself "this has been going on for years", and I do not understand why everyone got enraged over the executive order, yet ignore a similar situation with visas. On top of that, there are millions of illegals in the US, yet people protesting that they are getting deported, but to me, what makes them so special to violate laws while I have family members obeying the law and getting denied entry? Added to that, it is frustrating seeing people get visas yet have no relatives here or any connection to the US, yet my relatives are denied again and again. And it really is frustrating to see a non-citizen have relatives get granted visas to visit, yet I cannot (nothing against the non-citizens though).

Also frustrating are the idiotic consular officers, some of which seem to have some deep mental issues, to the point people try to avoid the visa process while they are there, and are even known to the guards who tell people up front about the consular officers. There is no appeal or recourse when a visa is denied. They say to bring evidence of this or that, but often they never even ask to review it, and already know they will deny the visa before the interview, all because as I previously stated, the person is not old or married with kids.
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Old 02-14-2017, 02:32 PM
 
1,830 posts, read 1,657,334 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwman2830 View Post
Yes, however, the US is no longer a dream country it used to be. Just watch Michael Moore's movie "Where to invade next" and see how happy are people in Europe with more generous vacation, pay bonus, paid maternity and sick leave, more humane criminal justice system, better food served at school lunches, etc. Sure the movie is a bit biased, but it is relevant.

I rarely see Western Europeans coming here to work, for most part I see Indians and Chinese on H1B visas. Sometimes I meet Eastern Europeans who immigrated here. Sometimes I see British nationals moving here as internal transfers but they are a drop compared to an ocean.
Granted, US may not be as attractive as it once was........to some.
According to Pew, US with 5% of global population houses 20% of world's migrants.

Quote:
As a Destination, the U.S. Looms Large

Despite global shifts in international migration, one constant remains: The U.S. has the world’s largest number of international migrants.

The number of immigrants in the U.S. doubled from 23 million people in 1990 to 46 million in 2013. During this time, no other country has come close to the number of foreign-born people living within its borders. For example, second-ranked Russia had about 11 million immigrants in both 1990 and 2013 (many of whom had moved within the former USSR prior to 1990). Consequently, the U.S. has bolstered its lead in the number of international migrants, doubling second-place Russia in 1990 and quadrupling it by 2013.

The U.S. has also become a major recipient of migrants from key countries with large numbers of emigrants. Although the U.S. was not a leading destination of migrants born in top origin countries in 1990, things have changed considerably in a quarter century. By 2013, nearly 1-in-6 (2.1 million) migrants born in India—the top country of birth for international migrants in 2013–lived in the U.S. Almost the entirety of the 13 million migrants born in Mexico–the second highest country of birth for international migrants in 2013—also lived in the U.S.

And the U.S. is the top recipient of migrants from about a quarter of the world’s countries. In 1990, the U.S. was the top destination of migrants born in 53 countries. In 2013, that number was about the same at 52 countries.
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Old 02-14-2017, 03:49 PM
 
3,282 posts, read 3,800,879 times
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Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
I think it's ridiculous that they require visas from many places in Eastern Europe and South America. Like why do they require tourist visas for Russians to travel to the United States, this isn't the 1980s anymore I'm hoping that Donald Trump will eliminate visas for Russians to travel to the United States, and I'm hoping that Putin does the same. There is no need to act like the Cold War is still happening. Also, why does the prospering Poland need a visa? Why do Croatia, Romania, Albania, all peaceful countries, why do their citizens need visas to enter here? It is just ridiculous

I also hope that they abolish visas for all countries from South America except Venezuela and Ecuador. Venezuela and Ecuador are really the only illegal immigrant threats now in South America. Colombia and Peru have thriving economies and very few people want to illegally come here. Argentina and Uruguay are wealthy enough that the risk of illegal immigrants is minimal, in fact even legal immigration to the US from those countries is just about non-existent. Paraguayans and Bolivians would rather immigrate to Argentina. Brazil is in a bad situation but the language barrier makes the US an unattractive destination.Just look at the statistics, Ecuador is the only South American country that is a big source of illegal immigration

[url=http://immigration.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000845]Demographics of Immigrants in the United States Illegally - Illegal Immigration - ProCon.org[/url]

It's time to stop the irrational fear of South America
There are way more Brazilian people in the US than are accounted for in statistics IMO. Here where I live I just see and hear more and more with the passing of the years. I know the community has grown exponentially in Miami and the east coast.

Illegal immigration(without papers) from South America to the US is rare because it is too difficult. The poor stay where they are, migrate internally, or migrate to bordering countries or other countries in the region.

In the US, many do overstay their visas, but they marry Americans to 'cure' it.
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Old 02-14-2017, 04:00 PM
 
2,631 posts, read 2,055,388 times
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Originally Posted by Vmodeb View Post
The US Visa Waiver Program does not include Macau and Hong Kong, both have higher GDP per capita than Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Portgual, Spain, Slovenia, Czech Republic, Slovakia, the Baltic states, Italy and Greece etc.

The reason is clear. Macau and Hong Kong belong to China, which is a developing country and are not indepedent countries.

Actually it doesn't matter as most people in Macau and Hong Kong are not interested in visiting the US because of too much bad news and the US is far away. People are not interested in moving to US too as Macau and Hong Kong are wealthy cities. However HK people are allowed visa free visit to nearby Guam and Northern Marianas, both US territories. Visiting Europe, Australia and New Zealand are more popular, they are more welcoming of tourists from East Asia and the depreciation of Euro has attracted increasing tourism.
Is this real or a personal narrative?
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Old 02-14-2017, 04:01 PM
 
2,631 posts, read 2,055,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nwman2830 View Post
I spot sometimes Japanese tourist men in black suits in San Francisco Bay Area. There is also a lot of Chinese tourists around Palo Alto, Stanford campus. They may be not visiting Chicago or New York as much but West Coast definitely.
They come to NYC plenty.
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