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Old 02-23-2017, 02:03 AM
 
263 posts, read 179,162 times
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Would you ever willingly renounce your old citizenship of your country of birth after acquiring the second citizenship of your new country where you live, even if it was not required?

What would drive you to do this? Taxes (the US), human rights (Russia) or a job that requires a top secret clearance?

Would you be willing to renounce your citizenship over its anti-gay laws if you were gay/lesbian? Would you to do this to stop paying for a second passport every 10 years just to visit your old country just because they do not recognize dual-citizenship and the passport of a country of which you became a naturalized citizen?
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Old 02-23-2017, 03:28 AM
 
13,510 posts, read 15,681,621 times
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I emigrated from the U.S. seventeen years ago. I qualify and could apply for citizenship in my country of residence, and I feel no attachment to the U.S. whatsoever. But, there are some financial advantages to having a U.S. citizenship only. And there are no additional advantages to repudiating it and having citizenship in my country of residence at present. I pay income taxes in both countries, and there is an offset, so this is not a problem.

Thus, for me there is no incentive to go through the rigamarole of dropping my U.S. citizenship and taking that of my country of residence.

I do feel that the U.S. has reached the point of political and social deterioration that I had foreseen decades ago and which made emigrating a painless move. But I am just a year shy of eighty and would expect to be dead before the U.S. plunges into a level of chaos and belligerence that would make me personally fear being a U.S. citizen.
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Old 02-23-2017, 03:36 AM
 
Location: Taipei
7,624 posts, read 6,048,729 times
Reputation: 5410
Quote:
Originally Posted by nwman2830 View Post
Would you ever willingly renounce your old citizenship of your country of birth after acquiring the second citizenship of your new country where you live, even if it was not required?

What would drive you to do this? Taxes (the US), human rights (Russia) or a job that requires a top secret clearance?

Would you be willing to renounce your citizenship over its anti-gay laws if you were gay/lesbian? Would you to do this to stop paying for a second passport every 10 years just to visit your old country just because they do not recognize dual-citizenship and the passport of a country of which you became a naturalized citizen?
Why would anyone renounce the old citizenship if their country of residence does not require them to do so?

If it is required to renounce the old citizenship to get a new one then it depends on which new country it is.
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Old 02-23-2017, 04:35 AM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
11,779 posts, read 8,634,482 times
Reputation: 3048
No, I would never renounce my British citizenship.

I would never want to become a US citizen either, due to their backwards taxation laws.
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Old 02-23-2017, 08:03 AM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,696 posts, read 2,059,060 times
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No. I have a lot of complaints about my homeland, but I am brazilian, and I will die as a brazilian.
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Old 02-23-2017, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Taipei
7,624 posts, read 6,048,729 times
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Well for me if it depends on how nice said country is. If it's Canada then hell yes, Pakistan then **** no.
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Old 02-23-2017, 08:51 AM
 
2,566 posts, read 1,544,421 times
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I have no particular attachment to the US and if my plan was to live someplace for the rest of my life, renouncement of my citizenship would be a consideration. It would have to benefit me personally (primarily a tax advantage) and it would have to be someplace stable. That said, there's not too many places in the developed world where I would be taxed less so it's not a likely scenario. Being an American does have its pluses and giving them up because I don't like the politics dejour would be stupid.
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Old 02-23-2017, 02:51 PM
 
Location: In transition
10,595 posts, read 13,598,147 times
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No... I eventually want to move to a warmer climate when I am able to do so in the future but I will always keep my Canadian citizenship no matter what. Depending on the country, I could see myself becoming a dual national if its permitted.
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Old 02-23-2017, 02:54 PM
 
5,806 posts, read 6,605,485 times
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Not unless my country (Norway) becomes a doomed dictatorship or something.
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Old 02-23-2017, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
15,017 posts, read 10,572,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
Why would anyone renounce the old citizenship if their country of residence does not require them to do so?

If it is required to renounce the old citizenship to get a new one then it depends on which new country it is.
Well, US citizens might. The US Federal Income taxes are based on citizenship, not just residency. Dual US/Canadian citizens in Canada have to file, as well as Americans of course.

Not all will have to pay taxes, but just the filing can be a pain. A friend of mine who is dual files, but keeps his US citizenship because of business and family reasons. He finds the US tax system cumbersome and complicated.

Read these two links and then ask yourself, if you were a dual citizen living in Canada full time with no plans of ever living in the US, would you keep your US citizenship when all it seems to be is chain and ball.

FATCA facts: What Canadians need to know about new U.S. tax law - Canada - CBC News


U.S. citizens living in Canada have a lot of extra tax-filing hoops to jump through | Financial Post
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