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Old 05-31-2017, 09:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
North America. Canada is more religious then most of Western Europe too.
Anyway Quebec is culturally Catholic country and is comparable to what Spain is. But overall Canada, there is a higher percent of people that attend churches in Canada than most of Western Europe.

That is even the case for Australia, and it seems a bit higher percent of people attending Churches than most of Western European countries, but Australia is less religious than the USA.

Last edited by other99; 05-31-2017 at 09:49 PM..
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:03 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
As others have noted, European religion tends to be a cultural identity and a veneration for tradition. America on the other hand is deeply suffused with a personal, experiential piety. Consider for example European countries that are widely reputed for religiosity – say, Poland, Portugal or Greece. Ask the random “man on the street”: “Sir, how would you describe your relationship with Jesus Christ, as your personal Lord and Savior?” I’d suppose that most people in these countries would be flustered by the question, even if they regard themselves as being committed Christians. But the plurality of Americans would respond along the lines of “My heart wholly belongs to Jesus”.
even the religous regions of europe are different to the religous parts of the usa , christian culture in the usa is unique

in the usa , the religous believe jesus was pro capitalism and getting rich
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Old 06-01-2017, 09:02 AM
 
Location: moved
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Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
even the religous regions of europe are different to the religous parts of the usa , christian culture in the usa is unique

in the usa , the religous believe jesus was pro capitalism and getting rich
Exaggeration aside, there's some true to that. Many Americans believe that their society is the "city on the hill", the community chosen by God to be exemplary to mankind. God rewards the faithful, here and in the hereafter, so it stands to reason (or at least Calvinist reason) that the faithful would prosper... and that the prosperous would be faithful.
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Old 06-01-2017, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
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I've never heard god bless (insert Western European country) in my entire life but i've heard god bless America thousands of times on American TV.
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Old 06-01-2017, 07:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
As others have noted, European religion tends to be a cultural identity and a veneration for tradition. America on the other hand is deeply suffused with a personal, experiential piety. Consider for example European countries that are widely reputed for religiosity – say, Poland, Portugal or Greece. Ask the random “man on the street”: “Sir, how would you describe your relationship with Jesus Christ, as your personal Lord and Savior?” I’d suppose that most people in these countries would be flustered by the question, even if they regard themselves as being committed Christians. But the plurality of Americans would respond along the lines of “My heart wholly belongs to Jesus”.
Those are good points. It is also worth noting that while the US is easily one of the most religiously involved countries in the world, it does not carry that label unlike those other countries.
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Old 06-02-2017, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
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Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
North America. Canada is more religious then most of Western Europe too.
I agree here, Canada is the least religious nation in North America but compared to Europe it is very religious. The USA and especially Mexico are religious nations. As a believer myself I want to see my nation remain faithful to God but as every year passes I see more and more liberal secularism creep in.
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Old 06-02-2017, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
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Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
As a believer myself I want to see my nation remain faithful to God but as every year passes I see more and more liberal secularism creep in.
You like your country to not be successful because the most successful parts of your country are the least religious.
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Old 06-02-2017, 10:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
I've never heard god bless (insert Western European country) in my entire life but i've heard god bless America thousands of times on American TV.
do dutch people ever say " thank god " in a sentence ?

i mean in a casual - throwaway fashion ? , its pretty common here even amongst people who are not religous

the " god bless america " thing , if a politician in ireland said that , he would be laughed at and mocked by everyone
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Old 06-02-2017, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,661 posts, read 16,083,689 times
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Originally Posted by irish_bob View Post
do dutch people ever say " thank god " in a sentence ?

i mean in a casual - throwaway fashion ? , its pretty common here even amongst people who are not religous
Oh yeah they sure do, especially the word "Godverdomme" (God damn it) is one of the most popular words in the Dutch language.
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Old 06-02-2017, 10:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
I agree here, Canada is the least religious nation in North America but compared to Europe it is very religious. The USA and especially Mexico are religious nations. As a believer myself I want to see my nation remain faithful to God but as every year passes I see more and more liberal secularism creep in.
your nation is not faithful to god , largely speaking it twists what jesus preached , like i said earlier , christian culture in america is unique in that it glorifies the wealthy
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