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Old 05-26-2017, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,555,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
In the US, standard/imperial is dominant but metric is used and understood a lot. Distances are usually in miles but we have running events which are 5k and 10k. Some things like soda pop are measured in 12 cans and 16 ounce bottles but larger sizes are 1 and 2 liter bottles. Wine is measured by the liter. All medication is metric as is everything else that's science based.

In Arizona south of Phoenix, distances are in kilometers, not miles.
My experiences and friends who work in retail that encounter many US tourists would disagree. They are lost when ordering in kilo's and grams. Haven't a clue what a litre is, and no idea about Celsius.

Kilometres is probably better understood, but only in the fact that it represents distance. They constantly ask
" what's that in miles " when giving directions...unless they are runners, they know what 10 K is
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Old 05-26-2017, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,555,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
Canada is probably a really interesting case study. It switched over from imperial to metric in the 70s or 80s, and most of the population seems to be comfortable only using a combination of the two. Not just one. For example, people will tell you their height in feet and inches, but have no idea what they are driving in miles per hour. Just km/h. It's kind of strange. I met an alleged Canadian nurse in Nepal two years ago who genuinely didn't know if we used metric or imperial. We'll probably continue to transition like this for a few more decades to come.
Sooner than a few decades I would imagine,except for a few trades like the building trade which tends to stick with imperial.

Anyone under 30 that I know, doesn't know imperial. My partner works in retail and American customers sometimes ask for things in ounces etc. The younger staff have no reference to what that is. The scales area all set in metric.
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Old 05-26-2017, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Sooner than a few decades I would imagine,except for a few trades like the building trade which tends to stick with imperial.

Anyone under 30 that I know, doesn't know imperial. My partner works in retail and American customers sometimes ask for things in ounces etc. The younger staff have no reference to what that is. The scales area all set in metric.
I'm in my mid (moving in on late) 40s and even I don't really know ounces that well.


I don't know many imperial measurements for liquids, except maybe for stuff that is related to specific types of containers like a mickey and a 40-ouncer for liquor, pints for beer, and I have an idea of what approximately a gallon container is.


I can do height and weight in both though. Construction materials (especially lumber) are in imperial like 2 x 4 inch boards or 4 x 8 foot sheets of plywood.


When I measure stuff myself my measuring tape has both metric and imperial on it. I generally use metric because I find "6 inches and a half and an eighth" a bit ridiculous.
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Old 05-26-2017, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
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My kids, who are teens and pre-teens, are even more metric than me.


They are clueless with imperial except maybe for height and weight. For that they do know both.


One thing that pushes metric in Canada is immigration. Many of my kids' friends come from immigrant families who have no family history with imperial. So they don't do the conversion of height and weight into imperial like more established families like mine occasionally do. There is no impetus for that so they just use kilos and cm - and in any case, here in Quebec at least in my kids' medical carnet that records their growth, vaccinations, etc., it's all in metric. But the doctor's assistant sometimes writes the conversion in pounds and inches in the margin. (I bet they wouldn't do that if we were immigrants.)
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Old 05-26-2017, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,882 posts, read 38,032,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
LOL...you could end you misery and look it up
So I looked it up and now I know!


Although it's not very intuitive, so there's a good chance I will forget by the next time I hear it!
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Old 05-28-2017, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
So I looked it up and now I know!


Although it's not very intuitive, so there's a good chance I will forget by the next time I hear it!
If you are like me you will. I have looked it up several times over the years.
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Old 05-28-2017, 09:01 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
16,588 posts, read 27,390,347 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
My experiences and friends who work in retail that encounter many US tourists would disagree. They are lost when ordering in kilo's and grams. Haven't a clue what a litre is, and no idea about Celsius.

Kilometres is probably better understood, but only in the fact that it represents distance. They constantly ask
" what's that in miles " when giving directions...unless they are runners, they know what 10 K is
Grams are understood better than kilos. I find it hard to believe they don't know what a liter is unless they don't drink soda at all as it comes in one and two liter bottles for the larger sizes. And as someone else said, even car engines are now in liters although we still by fuel by the gallon.

Celsius is the least used and least understood and will probably never catch on. It is used only in science.
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Old 05-28-2017, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
67,650 posts, read 60,925,505 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I'm in my mid (moving in on late) 40s and even I don't really know ounces that well.


I don't know many imperial measurements for liquids, except maybe for stuff that is related to specific types of containers like a mickey and a 40-ouncer for liquor, pints for beer, and I have an idea of what approximately a gallon container is.


I can do height and weight in both though. Construction materials (especially lumber) are in imperial like 2 x 4 inch boards or 4 x 8 foot sheets of plywood.


When I measure stuff myself my measuring tape has both metric and imperial on it. I generally use metric because I find "6 inches and a half and an eighth" a bit ridiculous.
That would be 6 and 5/8s inches. Which is roughly 16.7132 cm. Can't really see how either one is more user friendly than the other!
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Old 05-28-2017, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
23,766 posts, read 29,058,499 times
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working on the riverboat trade along the banks of the Big Muddy, we measure thing in fathoms. Oh and not just water depth but other things too, like shoe size and circumferences of circles and such
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Old 05-28-2017, 09:52 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 3,899,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
That would be 6 and 5/8s inches. Which is roughly 16.7132 cm. Can't really see how either one is more user friendly than the other!
Well, no one would use the 5/8th of an inch equivalent in metric. That's why standard and metric tools never match perfectly, because they don't try to match.
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