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Old 06-01-2017, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,874 posts, read 38,004,819 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post


Many bars in the US offer a large glass, sometimes called a schooner, that typically holds 24-32 oz. More rare is the yard glass which is even larger. The yard has its origins in England, I believe.
We have those here too.


In Quebec a yard of beer is generally called "un mètre de bière". More rarely "une verge de bière".


In the latter case it's kind of funny because "verge" is the old French equivalent for "yard". But in this way - as a measurement - it's only used on this side of the Atlantic these days. (Most often in gridiron football: "premier essai et 10 verges à faire" (first down and 10 yards to go).


In France "verge" almost always means "penis", as per the modern meaning of the word.


Stuff like this always makes our cousins from across the pond smile:


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Old 06-01-2017, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
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oh yeah, the use of "verges" in Canadian French always makes me laugh.
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Old 06-01-2017, 06:15 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 3,895,546 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
No, they'd just say "16.7132 cm" which frankly doesn't seem any more user friendly than 6 and 5/8s inches. I mean, let's be honest - it's not that one system is superior to another - it's just that they are different and each person relates more to one or the other based on where or how they were raised and what their career is now.

It would be nice if the whole world ran on one system of measurement, and currently different businesses and fields HAVE sorted things out and tend to be uniform throughout the world. But we're still a long way from a universally accepted system.
You misunderstood my point I think. No one is going to measure the equivalent of 6 and 5/8ths of an inch in metric. Why would they? It will be made in metric to be worked on by metric tools. Metric is going to round to different numbers. They aren't going to go to the 10,000ths of a CM, they will round it up. If something does need to be very precise, then metric still has the advantage. That's why most tiny drill bits are in metric, even here in the US.
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Old 06-02-2017, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,340,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
You misunderstood my point I think. No one is going to measure the equivalent of 6 and 5/8ths of an inch in metric. Why would they? It will be made in metric to be worked on by metric tools. Metric is going to round to different numbers. They aren't going to go to the 10,000ths of a CM, they will round it up. If something does need to be very precise, then metric still has the advantage. That's why most tiny drill bits are in metric, even here in the US.
Precision can be matched with imperial measurements as well, as fractions are infinitely fractional. It is just that conversions become more difficult as problems become more complex. When calculating measurements that are too small to relate to and mathematical operations are used to design and engineer, it is simply mathematically expedient to use metric.

This is why American machinists and engineers, and the rest of science in America is metric. On the other hand, woodworking and trades which deal in human scale operations remain comfortable with imperial measurements. For example, American woodworkers usually work down to 1/32 of an inch (a little smaller than a millimeter) in layout and can eyeball the rest. A machinist who needs to make calculations to ensure that a machine is making a precision cut will use metric to make it easier to calculate machine settings.

One of the reasons that imperial is still popular for "human scale" reckoning in some countries is that the measurements themselves are often related to the human body and its dimensions. A yard is close to the span of an average man's nose to extended finger tips. Hold the hands out in front of you with you flams facing each other, that is about a foot. Forearm to wrist is 18 inches, the last joint on the thumb is about an inch and where the expression, rule of thumb comes from.

Furthermore, while the meter can only be easily divided by 2 and 5, a yard can easily be divided by 2,3,4, and 6 which has significant advantages in terms of layout for many trades and household design.

I am not trying to argue that one system is superior to another. I use both, but I am simply arguing against the obsolesence of imperial measurements since they are a useful scale for perception, which for the everyman is more important than a system advantage in computation.
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Old 06-03-2017, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
27,141 posts, read 13,429,141 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Many bars in the US offer a large glass, sometimes called a schooner, that typically holds 24-32 oz. More rare is the yard glass which is even larger. The yard has its origins in England, I believe.
You can get a yard of ale glass in some traditional old English pubs ad drinking a yard of ale is a traditional pub game.

Yard of ale - Wikipedia

Newcastle Brown Ale from the city of Newcastle Upon Tyne in England is often served in a schooner type glass called a Geordie schooner.

Schooner (glass) - Wikipedia

Last edited by Brave New World; 06-03-2017 at 06:10 AM..
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