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Old 06-26-2017, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
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I don't know, I've seen romanian words and they did not look too different from their italian counterparts.

phonetically, on the other hand...
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Old 06-26-2017, 02:37 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forgotten username View Post
I don't know, I've seen romanian words and they did not look too different from their italian counterparts.

phonetically, on the other hand...
Romanian has a lot of borrowings of Hungarian and slavic languages even for many core words, such as "city" - all romance languages use some variation of "civitatem" while Romanian uses "oras". It also has unique features not shared by any other romance language. First of all, Portuguese, Spanish, Catalan, French and Italian dropped all noun declensions from Latin, while Romanian retains them. Also, Romanian features no definite article. The geographic isolation led Romanian to follow a completely different path of other Romance languages.

Last edited by Fabio SBA; 06-26-2017 at 03:40 PM..
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Old 06-26-2017, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Tacoma WA, USA
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Germanic: German
Romance: Italian
Slavic: Ukrainian (It sounds old and doesn't barrow as many western words as Russian does), I would also say Polish too.
Uralic: Finnish (Hungarian is kind of isolated from the rest of the group, and the other languages are pretty small)
Celtic: Welsh
Baltic: Lithuanian
Turkic: Turkish (I don't know, maybe a central Asian one would be better representation, but it's the first one I think of)

I'm curious to think which one is the most generic/represents the Indo-European language group? I heard that Lithuanian is the most archaic spoken language?
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Old 06-26-2017, 06:46 PM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
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Originally Posted by grega94 View Post

I'm curious to think which one is the most generic/represents the Indo-European language group? I heard that Lithuanian is the most archaic spoken language?
It's true that the Baltic languages are very conservative.

The urheimat of Slavic languages is acknowledged to be southern Russia, and the Slavic shares a common ancestor with Baltic. While the ancient people of that region migrated in distinct waves to India and Europe, the Slavic urheimat is roughly the same of proto-indoeuropean. Meanwhile, Slavic are the most recent indo-european people to be mentioned by the history, from the early middle-ages. There are no people identified to Slavs in the Bible or in ancient texts.

I'm not linguist, thus it's only a supposition... but Balto-Slavic languages would, therefore, be perhaps the natural evolution of PIE if the migrations never happened.
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Old 06-26-2017, 09:31 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Stereotypical implies familiarity so that's going to vary depending on where one is from. So here's mine:

Romance: Spanish. At one time in the US, it was probably French.
Germanic: German
Slavic: Russian
Gaelic: Irish Gaelic (though few would know it if they hear it, it's the stereotype when Gaelic is mentioned)
Semitic: Arabic, though along much of the US east coast is quite likely Hebrew.
Bantu: Swahili
Afro-Asiatic: Somali
Sino-Tibetan: Mandarin is what most think of. Cantonese is what most actually hear. So, Chinese.
Austroasiatic: Vietnamese
Iroquoian: Cherokee
Athabaskan: Navajo
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Tacoma WA, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabio SBA View Post
It's true that the Baltic languages are very conservative.

The urheimat of Slavic languages is acknowledged to be southern Russia, and the Slavic shares a common ancestor with Baltic. While the ancient people of that region migrated in distinct waves to India and Europe, the Slavic urheimat is roughly the same of proto-indoeuropean. Meanwhile, Slavic are the most recent indo-european people to be mentioned by the history, from the early middle-ages. There are no people identified to Slavs in the Bible or in ancient texts.

I'm not linguist, thus it's only a supposition... but Balto-Slavic languages would, therefore, be perhaps the natural evolution of PIE if the migrations never happened.
I've heard that the Slavic urheimat is located where the Pinsk marches are at (Northern Ukraine/Southern Belarus aka Chernobyl). The Slavic people where originally forest dwellers, not steppe peoples, the steppes was inhabited by Iranic peoples such as the Scythians and the Sarmatia's (thought to be the Amazonians from Greek legend), their closest living relatives are the Ossetians in the north caucuses (the only surviving Iranic language in Europe), if you look at river names of southern Ukraine/Russia they all are of Iranic origin, rather than Slavic.

Dnieper is derived from Sarmatian Dānu apara "the river on the far side."
Dniester derives from "the close river."

Although Volga is of Slavic origin
(The Russian hydronym Volga (Волга) derives from Proto-Slavic *vòlga "wetness, moisture", which is preserved in many Slavic languages, including Ukrainian volóha (воло́га) "moisture", Russian vlaga (влага) "moisture", Bulgarian vlaga (влага) "moisture", Czech vláha "dampness", Serbian vlȁga "moisture", and Slovene vlaga "moisture" among others)

It is transliteration of the original name of the river "Ra"
(The Slavic name is a loan translation of earlier Scythian Rā (Ῥᾶ) "Volga",[3] literally "wetness", cognate with Avestan Raŋhā "mythical stream" (also compare the derivation Sogdian r’k "vein, blood vessel" (*raha-ka),[4] Persian رگ rag "vein"[5]) and Sanskrit rasā́- (रसा) "dew, liquid, juice; mythical river".[6] The Scythian name survives in modern Mordvin Rav (Рав) "Volga".)
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:46 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
What languages are a stereotype of, or typically affiliated with, their language family? I'll start with my sentiments:

Romance/Latin: Italian
Semitic: Arabic
Slavic: Serbo-Croatian (not Russian for me, as I grew up around Serbo-Croatians)
Germanic: German (anyone associates English with it though?)
Turkic: Obviously Turkish

What's your take like?
OP, just because you were raised around Croats (or whoever), doesn't mean that's the stereotypical representative of the Slavic language family. You can see that, right? Much more likely are Russian or Polish, personal affiliations aside. Or should it be Slovene? What about Sorbian?

Semitic: Wouldn't it be Hebrew? Aren't the Jews the quintessential Semites? Hello?

Germanic: German, obviously.

Romance: Romanian, haha! Hey, if you can claim Serbo-Croat for Slavic, I can claim Romanian for Romance.

Turkic: Don't get me started. My personal faves: Yakut and Tuvan. But then, the topic isn't about our personal faves. ....right, OP? It's hard to tell w/your choice for Slavic.
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:49 AM
 
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Romance: Italian
Germanic: German
Slavic: Polish
Semitic: Hebrew
Celtic: Welsh
Indo-Aryan: Hindi
Sino-Tibetan: Mandarin
Turkic: Turkish
Indo-Iranian: Persian
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:51 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
102,294 posts, read 108,390,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grega94 View Post

Although Volga is of Slavic origin
(The Russian hydronym Volga (Волга) derives from Proto-Slavic *vòlga "wetness, moisture", which is preserved in many Slavic languages, including Ukrainian volóha (воло́га) "moisture", Russian vlaga (влага) "moisture", Bulgarian vlaga (влага) "moisture", Czech vláha "dampness", Serbian vlȁga "moisture", and Slovene vlaga "moisture" among others)
Влажность, humidity. (Russian)

Side note: it's interesting how many Iranic words there are in Russian. That's a fascinating study on its own.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 06-27-2017 at 11:03 AM..
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:02 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Stereotypical implies familiarity so that's going to vary depending on where one is from. So here's mine:

Romance: Spanish. At one time in the US, it was probably French.
Germanic: German
Slavic: Russian
Gaelic: Irish Gaelic (though few would know it if they hear it, it's the stereotype when Gaelic is mentioned)
Semitic: Arabic, though along much of the US east coast is quite likely Hebrew.
Bantu: Swahili
Afro-Asiatic: Somali
Sino-Tibetan: Mandarin is what most think of. Cantonese is what most actually hear. So, Chinese.
Austroasiatic: Vietnamese
Iroquoian: Cherokee
Athabaskan: Navajo
Gentoo, wouldn't most people's first thought on Iroquoian be Iroquois?

Athabaskan: Navajo or Apache. (Though Canadians would make other choices.) Though my personal fave is Hupa/Hoopa, of northern CA. A HUGE chunk of northern CA used to be Athabaskan-speaking. From Humboldt Bay down to the northern Bay Area/Sonoma. Cool, but sad that most of it's gone.

I agree re: Gaelic or Celtic: Irish.
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