Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-25-2017, 12:01 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
11,652 posts, read 13,033,460 times
Reputation: 6395

Advertisements

What languages are a stereotype of, or typically affiliated with, their language family? I'll start with my sentiments:

Romance/Latin: Italian
Semitic: Arabic
Slavic: Serbo-Croatian (not Russian for me, as I grew up around Serbo-Croatians)
Germanic: German (anyone associates English with it though?)
Turkic: Obviously Turkish

What's your take like?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-25-2017, 04:36 AM
 
3,326 posts, read 2,632,158 times
Reputation: 629
Romance: Spanish by far without doubts. Italian can sound very, very rare if spoken by some specifical italians like southern Sicilians. Others speak it too fast, I can understand the majority of written Italian but when it's the time to understand what are they speaking? A few words!

It's my opinion tho.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
11,652 posts, read 13,033,460 times
Reputation: 6395
Quote:
Originally Posted by Junter View Post
Romance: Spanish by far without doubts. Italian can sound very, very rare if spoken by some specifical italians like southern Sicilians. Others speak it too fast, I can understand the majority of written Italian but when it's the time to understand what are they speaking? A few words!

It's my opinion tho.
It's alright, but I hope you didn't choose Spanish because it's you're favourite Romance language?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
7,499 posts, read 6,326,774 times
Reputation: 3761
Quote:
Originally Posted by Junter View Post
Romance: Spanish by far without doubts. Italian can sound very, very rare if spoken by some specifical italians like southern Sicilians. Others speak it too fast, I can understand the majority of written Italian but when it's the time to understand what are they speaking? A few words!

It's my opinion tho.
i would say (standard) italian because it is the closest from the original latin language, and the most devoid of outside influences. Spanish has had an arabic influx with sounds which make it a bit different, like all the different "r" sounds. French has had germanic influences while Romanian has some slavic character.

It is funny that you mention southern sicilians, I actually have some difficulty with them and I think they speak fast, or at least they cancel some parts of the words and have a strange rythm. In general I find most southerners to speak fast and put weird stresses on words, whereas the stereotypical northern accent is kinda slow, like people north of Milan. I guess south of Italy is more influenced by Spanish, but mostly the southwestern part, which is the one I understand less (southeast is easier for me for some reason)

The easiest to understand for me is Piedmont / Turin accent but that's probably because I'm French.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 08:53 AM
 
Location: near Turin (Italy)
1,373 posts, read 1,449,716 times
Reputation: 2223
Quote:
Originally Posted by forgotten username View Post
i would say (standard) italian because it is the closest from the original latin language, and the most devoid of outside influences. Spanish has had an arabic influx with sounds which make it a bit different, like all the different "r" sounds. French has had germanic influences while Romanian has some slavic character.

It is funny that you mention southern sicilians, I actually have some difficulty with them and I think they speak fast, or at least they cancel some parts of the words and have a strange rythm. In general I find most southerners to speak fast and put weird stresses on words, whereas the stereotypical northern accent is kinda slow, like people north of Milan. I guess south of Italy is more influenced by Spanish, but mostly the southwestern part, which is the one I understand less (southeast is easier for me for some reason)

The easiest to understand for me is Piedmont / Turin accent but that's probably because I'm French.
I agree, phonetically Italian is probably the closest to Latin, in particular if you consider the ecclesiastic pronunciation (grammar is all another matter though). Italian has words with non-Latin roots too, mostly derived from the population that ruled the peninsula during the middle ages.

About southern accents, I've noticed that some of their typical expressions really have something similar to Spanish, in particular the preference for simple past tenses and the use of "stare" (to stay) and "tenere" (to hold) where regular Italian would require "essere" (to be) and "avere" (to have). On the other hand, we overuse composed past tenses (we use the passato prossimo even when talking about something that happened 10 years ago), which is somehow similar to French verb usage (I think).

Regional accents in general are more related to the regional language / dialect originally spoken in that area than anything else, sometimes (in particular with elders) the accent is so strong that even native from other regions struggle to understand it. Also, each region has its own expression which often don't make much sense in the rest of the country.

Spoiler


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fERZv62XW34&t=35s
^ in particular the end, at 1:58
He is from Apulia, if I'm not wrong

For par condicio, some stereotypes and weird accents from the North too

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pdky6EeDyPk



About the Turin accent, I've noticed something similar during the little time I spent in France. Last May I spent 10 days in Grenoble, and while in there I often had the impression that the people around be spoke with an accent similar to the one I heard back home (in particular when the speaker was older than 50). It was really weird, because what they said sounded familiar but unintelligible at the same time.
Maybe the common point is the dialect, which is part of the Francoprovencal group both in my village and in the neighbour French region?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Bologna, Italy
7,499 posts, read 6,326,774 times
Reputation: 3761
yeah, simple past is almost never used in French, unless you're telling a story or in litterature. I even have a tendancy to use super composed tenses like in conditional because the italian congiuntivo is a bit strange to me and I never know how to use it, so I guess sometimes I have a french way to say things like:

non pensavo che sarrebbero venuti instead of non pensavo che venissero

I always find it harder to remember how simple past is used, it is an entire other tense. It is simpler for me to make composed tenses like in French.

Maybe the Rhone Alpes accent is very similar to piedmont, I am not sure. This one is super strong (he also mocks the Québec accent at some point):
Spoiler
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ns4bQFxjRk
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 03:38 PM
 
9,229 posts, read 9,793,158 times
Reputation: 3316
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
What languages are a stereotype of, or typically affiliated with, their language family? I'll start with my sentiments:

Romance/Latin: Italian
Semitic: Arabic
Slavic: Serbo-Croatian (not Russian for me, as I grew up around Serbo-Croatians)
Germanic: German (anyone associates English with it though?)
Turkic: Obviously Turkish

What's your take like?
I heard Uyghur retains more phonological features of old Turkic than Turkish.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 04:52 PM
 
6,112 posts, read 3,943,121 times
Reputation: 2243
One thing I've noticed, French seems to be the most distinct of all the Romance languages.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2017, 11:30 AM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,736 posts, read 2,536,988 times
Reputation: 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
What languages are a stereotype of, or typically affiliated with, their language family? I'll start with my sentiments:

Romance/Latin: Italian
Semitic: Arabic
Slavic: Serbo-Croatian (not Russian for me, as I grew up around Serbo-Croatians)
Germanic: German (anyone associates English with it though?)
Turkic: Obviously Turkish

What's your take like?
I don't think firstly about Russian when someone talk about slavic languages, either.
Russian is for Slavic what English is for German and French for Romance: each one has a very own personality within the family.
Thus, my list:

Romance: Italian (though I'm native portuguese speaker)
Germanic: German
Slavic: Czech
Semitic: Arabic
Turkic: Turkish (and I hardly can remember other languages of this family)

More:
Indo-Arian: Hindi
Celtic: Welsh
East Asian sprachbund: Mandarin
Austronesian: Indonesian
Niger-Congo: Swahili (though I like to listen to Xhosa due to the clicks)
Uralic: Finnish

Last edited by Fabio SBA; 06-26-2017 at 11:39 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-26-2017, 11:41 AM
 
Location: São Paulo, Brazil
1,736 posts, read 2,536,988 times
Reputation: 1340
Quote:
Originally Posted by Razza94 View Post
One thing I've noticed, French seems to be the most distinct of all the Romance languages.
Romanian is even more.
French is at least somewhat readable for native speakers of Italian and Catalan, and less so for Spanish and Portuguese. Romanian, on the other hand, looks and sounds alien for every other romance speakers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top