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View Poll Results: Most overrated languages?
Italian 11 21.57%
Spanish 11 21.57%
French 23 45.10%
Japanese 5 9.80%
English 8 15.69%
Esperanto 13 25.49%
Russian 5 9.80%
Swedish 5 9.80%
Others (mention them) 6 11.76%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 51. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-18-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,014,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
I think most Chinese Canadians make their children learn Chinese (Mandarin) these days. So in near future, you will see a lot if Chinese Canadians speak English as their first language, but are also quite fluent in Mandarin. In fact, I know a Korean who sent his child to Chinese school.

On the other hand, Filipino families probably will not push their children too hard to master Tagalog.
But that was my point. These are people of Chinese origin teaching their kids a Chinese language. People of origin X often teach their kids language X. There is nothing new in that.
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Old 07-18-2017, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,014,760 times
Reputation: 11640
I am going to go out on a limb and say it's English.


Not that I don't think that English is the most important and influential language in the world right now.


But I do think that a lot of people seem to believe it has magical properties. This is true of both its native speakers and second language speakers of English BTW.


If you'd listen to some people you only have to learn English and all of a sudden you can land your dream job anywhere in the world, live anywhere in the world you want and everyone will want to be your friend.


Seems a bit much.
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Old 07-18-2017, 10:58 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 9,753,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
But that was my point. These are people of Chinese origin teaching their kids a Chinese language. People of origin X often teach their kids language X. There is nothing new in that.
No. Many Chinese Americans cannot speak Chinese at all, or not fluent.
However, nowadays the parents are very serious. They send their children to Chinese schools to learn to read and write. My cousin (living in America) does not allow his children to speak English at home.
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Old 07-18-2017, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,014,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
No. Many Chinese Americans cannot speak Chinese at all, or not fluent.
However, nowadays the parents are very serious. They send their children to Chinese schools to learn to read and write. My cousin (living in America) does not allow his children to speak English at home.
That there may be a resurgence of teaching of the heritage language among Chinese-Americans and Chinese-Canadians is not the same as saying that Dutch-Canadians or Iranian-Americans are learning Mandarin or any other second foreign language in appreciable numbers.
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Old 07-18-2017, 11:18 AM
 
9,229 posts, read 9,753,760 times
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
That there may be a resurgence of teaching of the heritage language among Chinese-Americans and Chinese-Canadians is not the same as saying that Dutch-Canadians or Iranian-Americans are learning Mandarin or any other second foreign language in appreciable numbers.
Of course.
But Chinese population in Canada is sizable, so the influence will expand.
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Old 07-18-2017, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,875 posts, read 38,014,760 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Of course.
But Chinese population in Canada is sizable, so the influence will expand.
That is definitely a possibility, but it's quite challenging to maintain full proficiency (spoken, reading, writing) in Chinese languages in western countries due to the writing system.
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Old 07-18-2017, 05:25 PM
 
4,668 posts, read 3,897,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
No. Many Chinese Americans cannot speak Chinese at all, or not fluent.
However, nowadays the parents are very serious. They send their children to Chinese schools to learn to read and write. My cousin (living in America) does not allow his children to speak English at home.
Many people are starting to realize the benefit of knowing more then one language. I hope it becomes more common that people can speak 2-3 languages.

Typically immigrants don't lose their native language until the 3rd generation. Most immigrants will speak their native language at home and with family. Second generation will still speak the native language with parents and family, but if they marry outside their language, the language spoken at home will likely become the language of the county they are in for the third generation. I know many second and third generation Americans and Canadians who are not entirely fluent in their native languages.
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Old 07-18-2017, 05:36 PM
 
7,275 posts, read 5,282,587 times
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I can't answer that question TBH. I live in America, and have for all my 57 years. I have lived through the explosion of Spanish speaking population in this country in my lifetime. Being from Boston, Italian was a lock. I took French class in high school. But of course I have heard all of those languages since I was a child. You say this isn't a worst language thread, because IMO that's English all the way. I think that many foreign languages sound so much more fluent than English, beautiful if you will. That's compared to English which has been with me 24/7 for life. I honestly do not know how English as a language is viewed in other countries, but somehow I don't think the approval ratings are that high, and I would tend to agree if that's true. Forget understanding a foreign language because I don't envision me ever taking the time to learn one (Spanish would be the first), but if I was judging it based on sound I'd always just check off English in the poll. So after this, maybe I will
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Old 07-19-2017, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Østenfor sol og vestenfor måne
17,916 posts, read 24,345,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
.

Typically immigrants don't lose their native language until the 3rd generation. Most immigrants will speak their native language at home and with family. Second generation will still speak the native language with parents and family, but if they marry outside their language, the language spoken at home will likely become the language of the county they are in for the third generation.
My mother's language was spoken n the home a fair bit until I was well into school age, but by the end of high school, I missed the boat for fluency, and in the intervening years, now decades later, I feel pretty dumb in the language for the most part except for very simple sentences concerning home life or describing my basic environment. I can read basic stuff, like a newspaper article, but I have to work out a lot of the vocabulary and use a dictionary, and I need subtitles to follow a tv show. I get the gist, but "advanced" vocabulary stumps me.

It should be noted that we did not live in an ethnic enclave where my language was supported either. My peers whose parents or grandparents were from Spanish speaking countries or Italy had a greater advantage because the community, both socially and in many local businesses, supported their language skills.
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