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Old 12-29-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
358 posts, read 413,007 times
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Which Country out of the two would have better looking Cities , Small Towns , Suburbs and overall give out a vibe of being orderly ?
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Old 12-29-2018, 09:51 PM
 
Location: Cannes
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Depends on which architectural style one prefer. I personally would go with the UK as far as cities go. For suburbs i prefer Americans
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Old 12-30-2018, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raheel12 View Post
Which Country out of the two would have better looking Cities , Small Towns , Suburbs and overall give out a vibe of being orderly ?
The main problem with this comparison is the massive size difference between the US and UK, and this is often reflected in connectivity and infrastructure.

It also depends which cities in the US you are companring the UK to, as there is a vast difference between cities with high levels of commuting such as NYC and many other parts of the US which are more car dependent.

The UK suburbs are often centered around rail and transport connections and are often very pleasant towns, whilst rural areas and small towns can be very charming, just as they are in parts of the US such as New England.

Urban rail in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

National Rail Enquiries - Maps of the GB National Rail Network

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Old 12-30-2018, 06:13 AM
 
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For cities, the UK is so London-centric that you’re comparing one world class city to a long list of US cities. I’ve done a lot of business travel elsewhere in the UK. It’s like going to rust belt cities like Cleveland or Buffalo. Not where I’d spend my tourist dollars.

The UK does a much better job of higher density village clusters with public transportation surrounded by green space. The Anywhere USA suburban sprawl is nasty. To me, the best suburban layout is 33 foot frontage lots with an alley for car parking. The UK has a lot of it. It’s high enough density to support walkable business and public transportation.
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Old 12-30-2018, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Great Britain
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Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post

For cities, the UK is so London-centric that you’re comparing one world class city to a long list of US cities. I’ve done a lot of business travel elsewhere in the UK. It’s like going to rust belt cities like Cleveland or Buffalo. Not where I’d spend my tourist dollars.
It really depends on the city, as cities in the UK generally range from the very old and ancient through to those founded during the industrial revolution.

However a number Northern Industrial Cities and Scottish/Welsh/NI cities have seen significant investment in recent decades.

List of cities in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia


Last edited by Brave New World; 12-30-2018 at 08:15 AM..
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Old 12-30-2018, 12:48 PM
 
Location: London, UK
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Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I’ve done a lot of business travel elsewhere in the UK. It’s like going to rust belt cities like Cleveland or Buffalo.
You obviously haven't been to our historic cities of York, Bristol, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Chester, Oxford, Norwich, Canterbury. Liverpool has seen better days but still has a nice core and Leeds, Newcastle and Manchester are bustling and in constant regeneration not to mention the pleasant southern coastal cities; Southampton, Bournemouth, Portsmouth, Exeter, Brighton, Ramsgate-Broadstairs-Margate.
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Old 12-30-2018, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Sweden
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The UK.
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Old 12-30-2018, 02:06 PM
 
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This question is such a no-brainer that you may have well asked if one would rather win $1 billion USD or spend an eternity licking Donald Trump's hairy unwiped arse.

One thing I love about UK cities is how they revolve around vibrant town centres with local high streets instead of strip malls. These town centres are human-scaled built with people in mind rather than how efficient cars can move around. Every corner is something different -- there may be a good public space to hang out in one corner, and within a 5-minute walk in one direction, you may end up in a quaint alleyway. There is always a sense of discovery when you walk around UK cities and towns -- something you won't find in a grid-pattern city. And every town centre has amazing street life for their size. And of course the beautiful architecture. Even Leeds and Sheffield have their own outstanding buildings.

I've just recently been to San Francisco, and while I like the city, it still feels too car-centric for me. And I find that Americans generally are more wary of their surroundings when they're in a public space. I remember asking this woman in a Muni station if this train goes to Embarcadero. I can still remember the initial panic and fright from her face when I asked the question kindly. After a second of assessing that I wasn't a threat, she answered politely. There is a general feeling that urban areas are not safe and that one is a potential victim of crime if one is not careful. In a way, it makes me understand the need to arm oneself, and I find that a terrible way to live one's life. And the people who work at public-facing jobs, like those station attendants and bus drivers, are just plain rude. I've seen a bus driver and a middle-aged rider yell at each other calling each other "b*tches". I've seen a station attendant yell at a tourist for not knowing how to use a clipper card (SF-equivalent of London's Oyster Card). I can't imagine something like these would happen in London.

As for the other "newer" cities such as Phoenix and Houston, I wouldn't even call them "cities" but rather "sh!tties".
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Old 12-30-2018, 08:27 PM
 
24,556 posts, read 18,239,810 times
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Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
You obviously haven't been to our historic cities of York, Bristol, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Chester, Oxford, Norwich, Canterbury. Liverpool has seen better days but still has a nice core and Leeds, Newcastle and Manchester are bustling and in constant regeneration not to mention the pleasant southern coastal cities; Southampton, Bournemouth, Portsmouth, Exeter, Brighton, Ramsgate-Broadstairs-Margate.
I used to work a week per month in Cambridge. Remove the students and it’s not even 100,000. Oxford isn’t much bigger. I thought we were talking about cities? Like big enough to support an EPL team or an NFL team.
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Old 12-30-2018, 08:50 PM
 
Location: near bears but at least no snakes
26,656 posts, read 28,667,075 times
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It's all been said, as far as I'm concerned. UK wins.

And even if you're in some rundown city, usually you are right next to gorgeous countryside. You don't have the ugly sprawling suburbia separating you from the country. The countryside seems to be everywhere.

The cities are walkable and enjoyable. It's all tailored for human beings, not for cars. Most places have preserved their history and that makes it more interesting. You can be waiting for an appointment with your lawyer but pop in to tour a genuine old castle across the street to pass the time. It's interesting to walk in the cities because you never know what you'll find. Unlike the US that has become a soulless spread of strip malls and boring convenience stores.

Our New England towns can be nice to look at but still, they are often isolated from what people want and need. A drive in the car is usually necessary.

I've never seen a city that is a "grid" as our streets go in all directions. Maybe NYC, that's a grid. For UK cities, I like York, Leeds, Norwich, and Salisbury. UK cities make you feel at home, they're set up for what people want and yet it seems that you are always right next to the most gorgeous green countryside in the world. You see horses, cows, donkeys, ducks, and swans as you drive along the edge of the city. And, of course, sheep are everywhere. You feel like you are a part of it all. When I'm in an American city, I only want to get out asap.

Last edited by in_newengland; 01-08-2019 at 10:38 AM..
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