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View Poll Results: Which is a better City?
London 48 44.44%
New York 60 55.56%
Voters: 108. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 03-18-2019, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Manchester NH
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They're both horrible, and should shrunk down to size (over time) to make way for a more egalitarian nature friendly society.

But New York in the interim since it is not such a central focus on capital investment like London is.
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Old 03-18-2019, 06:14 PM
 
Location: In the heights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovelondon View Post
Yeah, comparing densities is a ****** as different cities define their own city limits.

Plus, there is this phenomenon which I will call the "European Multiplier Effect", which postulates that a typical American city will need to have twice the density of a typical European city (on paper) to have the same vibrancy.
Right, so that's why it makes sense to find units that are approximately equal to each other in order to do comparisons and it's better that the units are some kind of semi-official thing because then there are more likely to be a lot of readily available stats.

US cities often have quite large boundaries and in general are pretty underwhelming.
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Old 03-19-2019, 01:19 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
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Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Unfortunately London is turning into just another 'bland' city with all the skyscrapers going up, what's even worse is that it will turn the streets into shadowy canyons bereft of sunlight - particularly in the winter months.
Bring out the torches to light those myriad canyons. Ridiculous hyperbole, only a small percentage of the city has any high-rises, current or under construction. Huge swaths of London remain low rise.

Last edited by modernist1; 03-19-2019 at 01:29 AM..
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Old 03-19-2019, 02:56 AM
 
Location: SE UK
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Originally Posted by modernist1 View Post
Bring out the torches to light those myriad canyons. Ridiculous hyperbole, only a small percentage of the city has any high-rises, current or under construction. Huge swaths of London remain low rise.
Read my post again, I used the word 'turning' and the phrase 'it will', as somebody has previously pointed out there is a LOT of building work going on in London right now and it is turning the city into another 'bland' city - you see a city full of high rise blocks and it could be anywhere, you see cities like Rome or Venice then you know its Rome or Venice (far more beautiful), a cityscape of spires, domes and vaults is far more aesthetically pleasing.


"And that city (Oxford) with her dreaming spires, she needs not June for beauty’s heightening"


Europe as a whole is a Northerly continent and London is FIFTY degrees north of the equator, it may be OK in San Francisco where even in the winter the sun rises 30 degrees above the horizon but in London in the winter months the Sun rises 15 to 20 degrees above the horizon only (hence its reputation for low sunlight hours) and 50 storey buildings are going to stop the sun hitting the streets for half the year.
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Old 03-19-2019, 07:14 AM
Status: "“If a thing loves, it is infinite.”" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Great Britain
27,180 posts, read 13,469,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Read my post again, I used the word 'turning' and the phrase 'it will', as somebody has previously pointed out there is a LOT of building work going on in London right now and it is turning the city into another 'bland' city - you see a city full of high rise blocks and it could be anywhere, you see cities like Rome or Venice then you know its Rome or Venice (far more beautiful), a cityscape of spires, domes and vaults is far more aesthetically pleasing.


"And that city (Oxford) with her dreaming spires, she needs not June for beauty’s heightening"


Europe as a whole is a Northerly continent and London is FIFTY degrees north of the equator, it may be OK in San Francisco where even in the winter the sun rises 30 degrees above the horizon but in London in the winter months the Sun rises 15 to 20 degrees above the horizon only (hence its reputation for low sunlight hours) and 50 storey buildings are going to stop the sun hitting the streets for half the year.


The financial diistricts in relation to the City of London and Canary Wharf have built some quite tall skyscrapers, and the Shard just across from the financial district is quite tall.

However I don't think London is going to get many really tall towers beyond what's already planned, as the heghts in the City have already reduced after complaints from the Civil Aviation Authority, and Canary Wharf is close to the City of London Airport.

There may be some tall buildings being built but to reach skyscraper status, a building has to be over 40 floors and at least 150 m (492 ft).

The term "supertall" can be used, for skyscrapers above 300 m (984 ft) whilst skyscrapers reaching beyond 600 m (1,969 ft) are classified as "megatall"

Most of the tall buildings built in London are just tall, some are skyscrapers, especially in the financial districts and a couple just scrape in to the supertall catergory, but thats as far as London is going and the plan is to have a few cluster areas, indeed most of the tall buildings are being built in the finacial district, parts of the east end, and sme parts of South London, the West End and many historic parts of London have a lot of planning laws and regulations.
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Old 03-19-2019, 07:17 AM
 
Location: In the heights
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Yea, I don’t think high-rises and skyscrapers are necessary for modern or urban living. You can get a lot of density and activity via low-rise and mide-rises as long as you aren’t reserving a bunch of room for parking and highways and have good transit access.
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Old 03-19-2019, 07:45 AM
 
839 posts, read 735,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Yea, I don’t think high-rises and skyscrapers are necessary for modern or urban living. You can get a lot of density and activity via low-rise and mide-rises as long as you aren’t reserving a bunch of room for parking and highways and have good transit access.
Right. Paris (within the Peripherique and not including La Defense) has roughly the same density as Manhattan, and Paris is mainly a mid-rise city. This is why I find it absurd when people talk about skylines. Tokyo, my 2nd favourite city in the world, is also another good example of a dense city that is mainly mid-rise. What matters most in every city is at street level as this is where people interact with their city.
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Old 03-19-2019, 08:17 AM
Status: "“If a thing loves, it is infinite.”" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Great Britain
27,180 posts, read 13,469,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Yea, I don’t think high-rises and skyscrapers are necessary for modern or urban living. You can get a lot of density and activity via low-rise and mide-rises as long as you aren’t reserving a bunch of room for parking and highways and have good transit access.



I agree, I don't think NYC or London have anything to prove, the whole world knows both are great cities.

Most Brits love NYC, and the US, and Americans love to stop off in London on their European travels.

Will be interesting to see the baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees in London in June.

Since the Patriots won a lacklustre superbowl, I will be supporting the Yankees, although New England is also a great part of the US.

No doubt they will be serving lots of cold beer, hot dogs and burgers in London on the 29th June.
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Old 03-19-2019, 10:52 AM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,416 posts, read 2,024,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easthome View Post
Read my post again, I used the word 'turning' and the phrase 'it will', as somebody has previously pointed out there is a LOT of building work going on in London right now and it is turning the city into another 'bland' city - you see a city full of high rise blocks and it could be anywhere, you see cities like Rome or Venice then you know its Rome or Venice (far more beautiful), a cityscape of spires, domes and vaults is far more aesthetically pleasing.


"And that city (Oxford) with her dreaming spires, she needs not June for beauty’s heightening"


Europe as a whole is a Northerly continent and London is FIFTY degrees north of the equator, it may be OK in San Francisco where even in the winter the sun rises 30 degrees above the horizon but in London in the winter months the Sun rises 15 to 20 degrees above the horizon only (hence its reputation for low sunlight hours) and 50 storey buildings are going to stop the sun hitting the streets for half the year.
So let's walk through Marylebone or Bloomsbury or Mayfair, or anywhere in fact except the City of London, Canary Wharf, or Vauxhall ... throw in the Elephant if you like - not a high rise in site. The only 'canyon' of which you speak, other than CW, would be Bishopsgate. I know London well, it's my hometown - in this instance San Francisco is irrelevant. As for 'spires', try The Shard ... Richard Rogers' 122 Leadenhall is arguably one of the most elegant buildings of the 21st century. Don't try to freeze London into some kind of a museum. And layering, that's the thing.
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Old 03-19-2019, 04:29 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
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As a post script to the above, height isn't the thing, it's design and build quality that matters. Re the latter many new builds in Vauxhall are lacking.
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