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Old 12-23-2019, 04:21 AM
 
Location: Australia
1,939 posts, read 831,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
I think the general rule of thumb is that Australia's salary is higher and job opportunities are slightly better, but Canada has far better politics and a stronger social safety net.
I am not necessarily disagreeing with you, but how would you think Canada's social safety net is stronger? We have Medicare which gives us free basic healthcare though generally not dental. We have a non-contributory old Aged pension which is however income and asset tested. We have a disability pension, supporting parents pension until the youngest child is six, unemployment benefits though of a fairly low amount, income tested subsidised childcare, family allowances...

What are the main differences seen in the politics?
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Old 12-23-2019, 04:40 AM
 
573 posts, read 279,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greysholic View Post
I think the general rule of thumb is that Australia's salary is higher and job opportunities are slightly better, but Canada has far better politics and a stronger social safety net.
You are wrong. Welfare in Australia is muuuuch better. Probably the best world after the Scandinavian countries.
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Old 12-23-2019, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,353 posts, read 30,671,149 times
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What I think I'd say in terms of social programs is that they're way more variable across Canada. Given that they tend to be devolved to the provinces who have a lot of latitude in terms of what they offer.


I mean, look at Quebec City and Montreal on the table in this article:


https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/chi...nada-1.5008106
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Old 12-23-2019, 11:32 AM
 
2,837 posts, read 2,556,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
What I think I'd say in terms of social programs is that they're way more variable across Canada. Given that they tend to be devolved to the provinces who have a lot of latitude in terms of what they offer.


I mean, look at Quebec City and Montreal on the table in this article:


https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/chi...nada-1.5008106
Which makes sense. Given the size and diversity of the country, most government programs and spending in Canada are delegated to the provinces, with the federal level setting the baseline laws and policies around what these programs should entail and making sure the funding is available, leaving the detailed implementation to the provinces and cities.

Most common example: most people (especially in the U.S.) think Canada has "universal healthcare", and by universal they tend to think total government control from the federal level. Where as in reality, each province has vast oversight into how they actually get to allocate healthcare resources. Some provinces have premium free health and dental programs for all (Quebec), and some provinces institute a minimum monthly premium (BC). Some provinces have a high concentration of healthcare resources (Southern Ontario), and some in scarce supply (Saskatchewan). At the end of the day in the domain of healthcare it's really each province running its own show.
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Old 12-23-2019, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
I suspect Quebecois may present a more intellectual tait to their character than their Anglo countrymen. No real evidence as never been to Quebec , but certainly true with the French beside their European neighbours the English.
I wouldn't get my hopes up too much when it comes to that.


Though I will say that Quebec's élite, albeit small, might be the most sophisticated largish demographic on this side of the Atlantic. Unlike some other places, we don't have university professors who can't hum a single Mozart song, or have never seen a movie that isn't a Hollywood blockbuster. It's also more common to have wine, fine cheeses, etc. on the dinner table even for weeknight meals. And to dress up when going out.


That said, Quebec also has a considerably larger proletarian* population share than the rest of Canada does.


So a typical crowd here has more of your blue-collar* type people mixed in with some élite champagne types, and not as many of your Dockers and Polo Shirt middle and upper middle class types that dominate in the prosperous cities and metros elsewhere on the continent.


(*Note that due to generous social programs and high wages for many blue collar trades, these types of people in Quebec tend to be non-bitter, non-aggressive and non-reactionary. Most are not really hurting relatively speaking, so there isn't much reason to be angry.)
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Old 12-23-2019, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Australia
1,939 posts, read 831,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
What I think I'd say in terms of social programs is that they're way more variable across Canada. Given that they tend to be devolved to the provinces who have a lot of latitude in terms of what they offer.


I mean, look at Quebec City and Montreal on the table in this article:


https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/chi...nada-1.5008106
Our federal government seems to have a bigger role in the funding of many social programmes but much of the implementation is at the state level.

In the wealthy countries child care is highly regulated and correspondingly expensive. Here there are extensive government subsidies which now cut out when the family income reaches $350,000 per annum. Low income families receive quite a lot of childcare at at a low cost. The cost of providing childcare varies a lot because of the factor of the cost of the premises, which naturally is much higher in the inner city.

I do not know much about the private school system in Canada but here the federal government extensively subsidies the fees, basically for historical reasons.

The biggest issue here seems to be the Newstart, or unemployment benefit. It is completely non-contributory. There is no limit on the amount of time that people can receive it so the government keeps it low so as to discourage dependency, especially multi generational dependency. Families receive extensive allowances to supplement this payment, which low income working families also receive. But single unemployed people without children would certainly it difficult to survive.
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Old 12-23-2019, 03:05 PM
 
2,837 posts, read 2,556,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
That said, Quebec also has a considerably larger proletarian* population share than the rest of Canada does.


So a typical crowd here has more of your blue-collar* type people mixed in with some élite champagne types, and not as many of your Dockers and Polo Shirt middle and upper middle class types that dominate in the prosperous cities and metros elsewhere on the continent.


(*Note that due to generous social programs and high wages for many blue collar trades, these types of people in Quebec tend to be non-bitter, non-aggressive and non-reactionary. Most are not really hurting relatively speaking, so there isn't much reason to be angry.)
Hmm interesting observation. I do tend to notice that this is more pronounced in Montreal areas, than say similar parts of Toronto or another similar-sized U.S. city.

Certainly much less "polo shirt upper middle class well-paid professionals" than cities like Toronto, Boston, Chicago, etc. (a small area of downtown MTL does exhibit that more and more these days, but it's more confined to the business district and areas around McGill and Westmount). When I was in Boston, this was very much a common scene: generally well-dressed youngish crowds (mid 20s to 40s) going out for drinks on weekends, often exhibiting school jerseys or affiliations with some top (private) college as a way to distinguish yourself from the rest of the U.S. working class

Where as in Montreal, on a typical night out, one does tend to find more blue collar types (at least by the way people dress). A lot of them are also students, recent graduates, or recent immigrants from francophone countries working in temporary/part time jobs hence much less of that "private-school educated upper middle class" vibe you'd find in other bustling NA cities.
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Old 12-23-2019, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,353 posts, read 30,671,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
I do not know much about the private school system in Canada but here the federal government extensively subsidies the fees, basically for historical reasons.

.

This is also provincially run in Canada, so subsidies vary. Some provinces like Ontario do not provide any money to private schools and so it costs 15000-30000 CAD or more a year.


Where I live in Quebec it is subsidized and so you can send your kid to private school for around 3000 CAD a year.
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Old 12-23-2019, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,353 posts, read 30,671,149 times
Reputation: 9892
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post

The biggest issue here seems to be the Newstart, or unemployment benefit. It is completely non-contributory. There is no limit on the amount of time that people can receive it so the government keeps it low so as to discourage dependency, especially multi generational dependency. Families receive extensive allowances to supplement this payment, which low income working families also receive. But single unemployed people without children would certainly it difficult to survive.
Unemployment benefits in Canada are one thing that is federal across the country.

Last edited by Acajack; 12-23-2019 at 03:37 PM..
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Old 12-23-2019, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
24,353 posts, read 30,671,149 times
Reputation: 9892
Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Hmm interesting observation. I do tend to notice that this is more pronounced in Montreal areas, than say similar parts of Toronto or another similar-sized U.S. city.

Certainly much less "polo shirt upper middle class well-paid professionals" than cities like Toronto, Boston, Chicago, etc. (a small area of downtown MTL does exhibit that more and more these days, but it's more confined to the business district and areas around McGill and Westmount). When I was in Boston, this was very much a common scene: generally well-dressed youngish crowds (mid 20s to 40s) going out for drinks on weekends, often exhibiting school jerseys or affiliations with some top (private) college as a way to distinguish yourself from the rest of the U.S. working class

Where as in Montreal, on a typical night out, one does tend to find more blue collar types (at least by the way people dress). A lot of them are also students, recent graduates, or recent immigrants from francophone countries working in temporary/part time jobs hence much less of that "private-school educated upper middle class" vibe you'd find in other bustling NA cities.
I'd generally described the style in Montreal as more polarized, with Sophia Loren on the one side, and Mike The Situation from Jersey Shore on the other. And a lot less Adam Sandler.
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