U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-23-2019, 04:04 PM
 
4,862 posts, read 4,124,056 times
Reputation: 2465

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by usuariodeldia View Post
You are wrong. Welfare in Australia is muuuuch better. Probably the best world after the Scandinavian countries.
Probably not. What basis do you lay such a claim? Australia has a shockingly unemployment benefit. Very low housing benefit. Poor aged care for those without considerable means, a lot of gaps that need to be paid even if privately insured, a pension that is means tested, for starters. Lots of countries outside of The Nordics have a better system to varying degrees. No idea how Canada stacks up beside Australia though. I thought similar.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-23-2019, 04:18 PM
 
4,862 posts, read 4,124,056 times
Reputation: 2465
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
Our federal government seems to have a bigger role in the funding of many social programmes but much of the implementation is at the state level.

In the wealthy countries child care is highly regulated and correspondingly expensive. Here there are extensive government subsidies which now cut out when the family income reaches $350,000 per annum. Low income families receive quite a lot of childcare at at a low cost. The cost of providing childcare varies a lot because of the factor of the cost of the premises, which naturally is much higher in the inner city.

I do not know much about the private school system in Canada but here the federal government extensively subsidies the fees, basically for historical reasons.

The biggest issue here seems to be the Newstart, or unemployment benefit. It is completely non-contributory. There is no limit on the amount of time that people can receive it so the government keeps it low so as to discourage dependency, especially multi generational dependency. Families receive extensive allowances to supplement this payment, which low income working families also receive. But single unemployed people without children would certainly it difficult to survive.
Regarding New Start (dole) it is dismally low but that was not always the case. It was regarded as reasonably generous until the late nineties, at least compared to UK welfare payments.
The Conservative Howard government found it an easy target and things never repaired, even with the Gillard Labor government giving a rise.
The massive inflation in rent prices this century has further devalued the payment and is regarded as way too low.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-23-2019, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
15,014 posts, read 10,566,267 times
Reputation: 9128
Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
I am saying what I stated. Melbourne has designated two areas as official India Towns (localities) It obviously is to a large extent already home to a substantial Sub Continental population but will now become officially recognised.


Areas where earlier European migrants have broken up due to many within those groups, moving into a more suburban setting, following the native born example. Besides there are obviously less of them as one generation passes on and fewer newer migrants come from countries that were once prominent.


I would agree, as already stated that Canada is less conservative than Australia. Australia, to my mind, is far too conservative for its own good.


Other points exactly. Australia gets far more coverage in UK, if not EU in the media.
I can't speak for all of Canada, but in Vancouver these " ethnic " communities, for the most part are not officially recognized. For example, Little Italy only became officially recognized by the city in 2016, just 3 years ago, even though it's been Little Italy since the 1930's. So I'm not sure if it is a " Canadian " thing.

Last edited by Natnasci; 12-23-2019 at 04:43 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 02:00 AM
 
573 posts, read 279,101 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by the troubadour View Post
Probably not. What basis do you lay such a claim? Australia has a shockingly unemployment benefit. Very low housing benefit. Poor aged care for those without considerable means, a lot of gaps that need to be paid even if privately insured, a pension that is means tested, for starters. Lots of countries outside of The Nordics have a better system to varying degrees. No idea how Canada stacks up beside Australia though. I thought similar.
Because healthcare in Australia is universal, while in Canada it varies by province. In my experience healthcare in Montreal was terrible, I had to wait for hours to see a GP and at the end I couldn't see one but instead a nurse. shocking

Students in Australia can get an allowance and $1000 every 6 months. I received one when I did my undergrad and I kept receiving when I went to Canada to study, I also got $6K for my overseas studies. Plus, lots of funds to study in Asia through the Colombo Plan. Canadian students would dream if they could get something like it! None of the Canadians I met in Montreal were receive something as generous as the allowances that Australian students get. Also most of the students in Australia get the government loans (HECS) - In Montreal I didn't meet anyone who got a government loan. Their fees are cheaper tho, but fees in Australia are not super expensive.

Unemployment benefits. Australian can get unlimited this, Canadians don't have anything as generous like it.

As a student I had a concession card that provided me cheap medicine, cheaper entry in museums, concerts, etc. You also get the student price, so you have two benefits.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 03:10 AM
 
Location: Australia
1,939 posts, read 831,353 times
Reputation: 3776
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I can't speak for all of Canada, but in Vancouver these " ethnic " communities, for the most part are not officially recognized. For example, Little Italy only became officially recognized by the city in 2016, just 3 years ago, even though it's been Little Italy since the 1930's. So I'm not sure if it is a " Canadian " thing.
We do not really have a Little Italy in Sydney these days. Leichhardt used to be the centre of the Italian community but now it is increasingly diverse. Haberfield has some Italian groceries and patisseries but some of the prominent ones have been replaced by Asian restaurants. The Italian born community is mostly very old and dying out. The second generation are widely dispersed and unfortunately few speak any Italian. The last wedding we went to involving anyone Italian was Italian/Cambodian- Chinese. Three ceremonies, three sets of clothes and a great Australian reception overlooking the harbour.

The more recent immigrants are Asian and already many of the more established disperse.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Montreal > Quebec > Canada
519 posts, read 504,878 times
Reputation: 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by usuariodeldia View Post
In Montreal I didn't meet anyone who got a government loan. Their fees are cheaper tho, but fees in Australia are not super expensive.
What? Quebec has a generous Government Guaranteed Student Loan program, with reduced interest rates. But it's reserved to Quebec residents, who I assume you did not hang out with much since you probably went to McGill or Concordia, which is full of out-of-province students.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Montreal > Quebec > Canada
519 posts, read 504,878 times
Reputation: 324
Quote:
Originally Posted by usuariodeldia View Post
Because healthcare in Australia is universal, while in Canada it varies by province. In my experience healthcare in Montreal was terrible, I had to wait for hours to see a GP and at the end I couldn't see one but instead a nurse. shocking
Now you take an appointment online and show up at the clinic when it's time, you don't have to wait "hours to see a GP".

You'll have to wait if you go to an hospital's emergency room for a non-urgent matter, though.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 08:23 AM
 
573 posts, read 279,101 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by begratto View Post
Now you take an appointment online and show up at the clinic when it's time, you don't have to wait "hours to see a GP".

You'll have to wait if you go to an hospital's emergency room for a non-urgent matter, though.
And can you find available appointments within hours of doing this online? Because it's been like that for ages in Australia.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 08:25 AM
 
573 posts, read 279,101 times
Reputation: 468
Quote:
Originally Posted by begratto View Post
What? Quebec has a generous Government Guaranteed Student Loan program, with reduced interest rates. But it's reserved to Quebec residents, who I assume you did not hang out with much since you probably went to McGill or Concordia, which is full of out-of-province students.
That's the thing. In Australia this is universal. Hence, my point stating that welfare in Australia is better. Do quebecois also get $580 every two weeks for your whole degree?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2019, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
15,014 posts, read 10,566,267 times
Reputation: 9128
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaMay View Post
We do not really have a Little Italy in Sydney these days. Leichhardt used to be the centre of the Italian community but now it is increasingly diverse. Haberfield has some Italian groceries and patisseries but some of the prominent ones have been replaced by Asian restaurants. The Italian born community is mostly very old and dying out. The second generation are widely dispersed and unfortunately few speak any Italian. The last wedding we went to involving anyone Italian was Italian/Cambodian- Chinese. Three ceremonies, three sets of clothes and a great Australian reception overlooking the harbour.

The more recent immigrants are Asian and already many of the more established disperse.
The irony of Vancouver making Little Italy official is exactly what you have posted. Very few Italians live there now, " The Drive " ( short for Commercial Drive ) is known more for it's coffee shops, brew pubs, and bohemian atmosphere.

Vancouver sounds a bit like Sydney in that regard.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > World

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top