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Old 06-04-2021, 08:23 AM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
809 posts, read 468,818 times
Reputation: 1448

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
London is doing very well and can now make it's own financial rules outside of the EU, thereby encouraging more business.

London is an international city and does not rely on protectionist blocks, it also should be noted that Switzerland, also a major financial centre is also outside of the EU.

The US itself may be subject to higher corporation tax and even a financial services tax if some politicians get their way.
London is an international city under the sovereign of a populist and inward looking central government. As we all know, the UK is a unitary state so a local authority has much less power than a state and/or city in the US. Also - economies of scale - the UK from an economic perspective is much smaller than the US and has to deal with import controls with its neighbors right across the channel so UK trading now is far from frictionless, just ask Northern Ireland.

Advantage New York right now
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Old 06-04-2021, 09:22 AM
Status: "“If a thing loves, it is infinite.”" (set 16 hours ago)
 
Location: Great Britain
27,162 posts, read 13,449,232 times
Reputation: 19454
Quote:
Originally Posted by norcal2k19 View Post
London is an international city under the sovereign of a populist and inward looking central government. As we all know, the UK is a unitary state so a local authority has much less power than a state and/or city in the US. Also - economies of scale - the UK from an economic perspective is much smaller than the US and has to deal with import controls with its neighbors right across the channel so UK trading now is far from frictionless, just ask Northern Ireland.

Advantage New York right now
Hardly an inward looking Government, indeed we have managed over £1 Trillion in international trading deals and are currently negotiating members of CPTPP, with the possibility of closer CANZUK relations/

As for NI, in terms of veterinary certificates, it was always carried out as a whole, and NI does not effect London, which is an international financial, tech and science hub rather than a place exporting goods. In terms of the NI issue it amounts to a very small amount of trade in relation to NI itself, and negotiations are on-going.

The big advantage for London is that is free from EU red tape, and can now deregulate and design new rules to attract ever more business, which is what it is now doing following the Hill report in to stock market reform and plans by the current Chancellor of the Exchequer to make London the most attractive city to do business in, and invest in.

The UK has also developed closer links with other financial hubs including Switzerland and Singapore.

Last edited by Brave New World; 06-04-2021 at 09:33 AM..
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Old 06-05-2021, 06:07 AM
 
Location: SE UK
14,820 posts, read 12,021,563 times
Reputation: 9813
Quote:
Originally Posted by norcal2k19 View Post
London is an international city under the sovereign of a populist and inward looking central government. As we all know, the UK is a unitary state so a local authority has much less power than a state and/or city in the US. Also - economies of scale - the UK from an economic perspective is much smaller than the US and has to deal with import controls with its neighbors right across the channel so UK trading now is far from frictionless, just ask Northern Ireland.

Advantage New York right now
If anything leaving the shackles of the EU proves the exact opposite no!!? Throughout history if theres one thing for sure you can't say about the UK is that its 'inward looking'!
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Old 06-07-2021, 08:14 AM
 
Location: In the heights
37,131 posts, read 39,380,764 times
Reputation: 21217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brave New World View Post
Upstate New York is more the equivalent of the Chilterns and Thames Valley, whilst Connecticut is more similar to the green space such as the Surrey Hills and Kent Downs, whilst the NJ Palisades are more similar to the Thames Estuary and Marshes rather than a planned greenbelt that encircles London and was specifically designed from Victorian times to stop urban sprawl.

Surrey Hills AONB - Wikipedia

Kent Downs - Wikipedia

Chiltern Hills - Wikipedia

South Thames Estuary and Marshes - Wikipedia

Epping Forest - Wikipedia

Upstate New York is a different beast consisting of parts of New York state outside of the NY metropolitan area, though that area does have very large forests and nature preserves.


What the sizable amount of greenspace in the NYC metropolitan area does do is limit development on those lands to preserve them, but those aren't as often farmland as they are just nature. It's a different setup, but certainly there's a good deal of accessible nature within the NYC metropolitan area that is free from development. It's just that it doesn't have nearly as much farmland in the metropolitan area.
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Old 07-01-2021, 04:03 AM
Status: "“If a thing loves, it is infinite.”" (set 16 hours ago)
 
Location: Great Britain
27,162 posts, read 13,449,232 times
Reputation: 19454
London.

Lavender fields in and around London - Time Out (June 2021)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53Z3xsK3L_0


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6zwFy0-BKI


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0q_mm2ICJw&t=2779s


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__BrqQISjVE

Last edited by Brave New World; 07-01-2021 at 04:18 AM..
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Old 07-01-2021, 08:12 AM
 
8,373 posts, read 4,386,334 times
Reputation: 12033
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
I was in London last March, right before Covid changed everything, and I couldn't get over the dense crowds all throughout the city, and I'm not just talking about the usual areas around Buckingham palace, Oxford street and Picadilly Circus... London is packed throughout...

I'm a native New Yorker, grew up there. I live in Florida now but I go back to visit friends and family 3 - 4x a year. I flew from JFK to Heathrow last March, and I set it up so that I could stay in New York for the week prior, to visit family and have a little fun...

After a few days in London, I came away with the feeling that London is a much more populated city than New York...which is funny, because a decade ago, it felt the opposite; New York felt significantly more populated...but not anymore.

So I decided to look up the most current population estimates for both cities. I used worldpopulationreview.com and a few other sources to check the numbers, and lo and behold my feeling was right. -- New York has actually lost several hundred thousand people over the past number of years and stands at a 2021 population of 8.23 million. London on the other hand has grown tremendously and currently stands at a population 9.425 million; over 1.2 million more people than New York!... And you can really feel it walking the streets and taking public transportation.

If we're talking about metropolitan areas, New York is still larger...but if you're comparing greater London to the 5 boroughs, London is the much larger city....

Go London! What an epic town...

I agree with that. I live in Boston (US) largely because it feels like a small London (UK) :-). I'd prefer a world city, but NYC has, for a while now, been trying hard to fall out of the world league into provincial ****.
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Old 07-01-2021, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Yokohama, Japan
153 posts, read 110,430 times
Reputation: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnrgby View Post
I agree with that. I live in Boston (US) largely because it feels like a small London (UK) :-). I'd prefer a world city, but NYC has, for a while now, been trying hard to fall out of the world league into provincial ****.
What makes you say this? I visited there a couple of years ago and thought it was quite "worldly".
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Old 07-02-2021, 05:43 AM
 
8,373 posts, read 4,386,334 times
Reputation: 12033
Quote:
Originally Posted by indigorunner View Post
What makes you say this? I visited there a couple of years ago and thought it was quite "worldly".
Just take a look at discussions in the NYC section of this forum, that will tell you all about the "spirit of place" in NYC :-). I initially lived near NYC for 3.5 years in the early to mid-1980s (when I came to the US for school, on a student visa), I have lived in the Northeast of the US ever since then & have been visiting NYC very frequently in the past 37 years (and have been spending weeks at a time there in recent years, since I actually own a tiny pied a terre in NYC). Before the Internet age, NYC used to be the news-exchange hub of the world, since it was the center of printing and communications... oh man, all the amazing bookstores! (that have all closed in the meantime), the news agencies, all the international representatives of this and that. Since the world went online, all of that vanished. Coincidentally, due to free dispensing of welfare, the city has attracted a huge amount of welfare lifestyle, with associated crime culture and serious lack of education, and that segment of NYC population (which is rapidly becoming the largest segment) is strongly asserting itself as THE authentic character of NYC, while being clueless about how to run anything, let alone a massive cosmopolitan city. A lot of old architecture has come down, replaced by glass scrapers that just look cheap (altough they certainly aren't :-) and without any kind of aesthetic identity or atmosphere. The city has severed almost all living continuity with the past. The only activity still left in the city seems to be eating.


Again, maybe my aging is preventing me from seeing something very thrilling about contemporary NYC... but it is somehow not preventing me from still feeling a thrill of London ("Why, Sir, you find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford."— Samuel Johnson, circa 1750 :-). Or maybe it is that I have too much exposure to NYC, and do not get to see London that often.

Last edited by elnrgby; 07-02-2021 at 06:19 AM..
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Old 03-18-2022, 08:45 AM
 
408 posts, read 168,978 times
Reputation: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingsdl76 View Post
I was in London last March, right before Covid changed everything, and I couldn't get over the dense crowds all throughout the city, and I'm not just talking about the usual areas around Buckingham palace, Oxford street and Picadilly Circus... London is packed throughout...

I'm a native New Yorker, grew up there. I live in Florida now but I go back to visit friends and family 3 - 4x a year. I flew from JFK to Heathrow last March, and I set it up so that I could stay in New York for the week prior, to visit family and have a little fun...

After a few days in London, I came away with the feeling that London is a much more populated city than New York...which is funny, because a decade ago, it felt the opposite; New York felt significantly more populated...but not anymore.

So I decided to look up the most current population estimates for both cities. I used worldpopulationreview.com and a few other sources to check the numbers, and lo and behold my feeling was right. -- New York has actually lost several hundred thousand people over the past number of years and stands at a 2021 population of 8.23 million. London on the other hand has grown tremendously and currently stands at a population 9.425 million; over 1.2 million more people than New York!... And you can really feel it walking the streets and taking public transportation.

If we're talking about metropolitan areas, New York is still larger...but if you're comparing greater London to the 5 boroughs, London is the much larger city....

Go London! What an epic town...
I have just come across this thread by accident.

Regarding London's rise. In the late 1970s onwards, British governments decided to make London a world mega city, based on financial services. Nothing wrong with that, but it was done at the expense of the rest of the UK. Government money was poured into the city in the form of infrastructure. The infrastructure was in the form of the essential transportation of: rail, road and airports, with all being interconnected. International links were focused on. Other infrastructure was in education in schools, and universities. Universities also attract lucrative foreign students leaving links behind. Quality schools attract high earning professionals. Also, new build and renovated quality housing was encouraged. The old redundant dock areas were made enterprise areas with special incentives for private organisations from all over the world to set up. Infrastructure and transport was provided by public money. This public funded infrastructure was the base to attract private enterprise to build upon. It worked, as a second financial centre emerged in Docklands.

But at the time London was rising to a world mega city the provincial cities were declining, looking very shoddy and deprived, with pretty well zero public investment. In 1980 the UK's population was 53.3 million. In 2020 it was 68.5 million. A substantial rise of about 15 million in about 40 years - 36%. Yet the populations of Liverpool, a major deep water commercial port city, and other cities, dropped. All was attracted to the London centric south east of England. The places university graduates could get jobs was around London.

In 1980 one third of Liverpool's metro while under construction, was cancelled, with miles of tunnels and trackbed still awaiting trains and rails. Leeds only has buses to get around, which is a disgrace for such a city. Since 1980 London had built in rail alone: the Docklands Light Railway metro of over over 30 stations, the extensive Overground metro, extensions to the Underground metro, extensive Thameslink, Heathrow Express, Eurostar run in, and now Crossrail, a 40 mile line from east to west through the centre. High speed rail is being construction into London right now, while Liverpool, Sheffield, Newcastle, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Leeds are omitted. It is all way out of proportion to what the the rest of the country received and still receives.

There was high focus on UK's London-Oxford-Cambridge power triangle, pretty well ignoring the rest of the UK. The others were drip fed to keep them alive.

But London did handle the expansion well. Ken Livingston was the mayor of London for much of the growth period. Much can be attributed to him. He got London, Paris and NYC to form close links with each other - learning from each other and co-operating in mutual interests. Livingstone's powers were less than the mayor of NYC, but Livingstone did all he could to discourage cars, encouraging public transport, cleaning up the air quality (emissions & congestion charging zones, encouraging EV buses, etc), and creating vibrant local centres. Before Livingstone came along London was a place for outsiders, who cared little of the city, to make money from. Being a Londoner he full understood the diverse city, viewing London was for Londoners, no matter where they came from, creating a highly liveable, diverse and secure city.

London went about its evolution in the past forty years better than Paris and NYC in general by focusing on the living environment. Although Paris does score highly in their living environment, also scoring highly in public rail transport. What let NYC down was focusing on business rather than people. Only for Livingstone, London would have been more like NYC. Livingstone succeeded so much London is more like a state within a state, with an economy more inline with NYC and Paris than Liverpool or Leeds.

Last edited by Dave Davis; 03-18-2022 at 09:26 AM..
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Old 03-22-2022, 02:28 PM
 
Location: In the heights
37,131 posts, read 39,380,764 times
Reputation: 21217
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnrgby View Post
Just take a look at discussions in the NYC section of this forum, that will tell you all about the "spirit of place" in NYC :-). I initially lived near NYC for 3.5 years in the early to mid-1980s (when I came to the US for school, on a student visa), I have lived in the Northeast of the US ever since then & have been visiting NYC very frequently in the past 37 years (and have been spending weeks at a time there in recent years, since I actually own a tiny pied a terre in NYC). Before the Internet age, NYC used to be the news-exchange hub of the world, since it was the center of printing and communications... oh man, all the amazing bookstores! (that have all closed in the meantime), the news agencies, all the international representatives of this and that. Since the world went online, all of that vanished. Coincidentally, due to free dispensing of welfare, the city has attracted a huge amount of welfare lifestyle, with associated crime culture and serious lack of education, and that segment of NYC population (which is rapidly becoming the largest segment) is strongly asserting itself as THE authentic character of NYC, while being clueless about how to run anything, let alone a massive cosmopolitan city. A lot of old architecture has come down, replaced by glass scrapers that just look cheap (altough they certainly aren't :-) and without any kind of aesthetic identity or atmosphere. The city has severed almost all living continuity with the past. The only activity still left in the city seems to be eating.


Again, maybe my aging is preventing me from seeing something very thrilling about contemporary NYC... but it is somehow not preventing me from still feeling a thrill of London ("Why, Sir, you find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford."— Samuel Johnson, circa 1750 :-). Or maybe it is that I have too much exposure to NYC, and do not get to see London that often.

One thing to recognize is that the NYC forum on City-Data is generally older, curmudgeonly and a sizable chunk of the regular posters are from people who do not live in the city and have basically severed most of their connection to the city and sometimes some facets of reality. As such it's not that representative of the city. Something like reddit would probably highlight a lot more of what's current and exciting in the city.
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