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Old 05-07-2021, 01:43 AM
 
1,136 posts, read 525,283 times
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Mandarin is the most used in Taiwan. Taiwan is not in Mainland China or Mainland Asia.

China will continue to have more trade with other countries. The developed world are surely good at some industries but can't compete with developing countries which can produce things more cheaply. Most people in our world can't afford things made in developed countries due to more expensive costs. The US has been setting an example for other rich and poor countries, being the largest importer of Chinese made goods.

In the past, many people learnt Japanese because Japan was a large spender and exporter. Also, most japanese people can't communicate in english. People must learn japanese if their countries have japanese tourists.
Quote:
Originally Posted by marlaver View Post
Yep, Mandarín is still very limited to its mainland, as this graphic shows. But don't sleep on the rise of China's agressive investments/bussiness overseas. That could become a factor as language spreader in the future.
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Old 05-07-2021, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Prepperland
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Originally Posted by manitopiaaa View Post
The Chinese population in the U.S. is 5 million. That's not huge by any stretch and certainly doesn't exert any cultural pull among Americans (nobody is bothered to learn Mandarin because of 5 million people, especially when the alternative is Spanish, with 62 million Americans being Hispanic).
I bet the majority speak Cantonese, and not Mandarin.
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Old 05-07-2021, 01:53 AM
 
Location: Brackenwood
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Nope, too localized and much of the Mandarin-speaking business/educated class has already learned English.
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Old 05-07-2021, 02:13 AM
 
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Full English sentence conversation isn't common in Taiwan and Mainland China, including in the largest cities Taipei, Beijing and Shanghai. Foreigners fluent in Chinese tend to stay longer or permanently in China.

The situation of Mandarin is and will still be similar to the global learning and usage of Japanese language in the past and future. The major difference is Mandarin is already a language of the United Nations, Japanese is not and unlikely to be in the future.
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Old 05-07-2021, 08:47 AM
Status: "From 31 to 41 Countries Visited: )" (set 6 days ago)
 
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Sorry, Arabic, Spanish, then German, Russian way before just because there is more than just one or two sovereign republics that are in this vital communication spectrum. Although, I am a fan of what I did with Mandarin Chinese in High School. I learned that one decade 10 years prior to learning Romanian alliance to ethnic grounds. Although, Hindi Indian, and this form of Chinese host huge massive Continental seeming countries with lots of rather vast regions right within.
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Old 05-07-2021, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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I'd imagine that global interest in Mandarin as a language will increase as China's economy continues to grow (I think by some measures it might already be the world's largest economy, but if not, it's probably only a matter of time before it is).

That said, I agree with everyone else that English has pretty much cemented its status as the global language for the foreseeable future. At this point, I don't think it's at all dependent on the United States or any other English speaking nation being the world's largest economy - for reasons already mentioned, English is here to stay as the international language, whether or not the US maintains its position as the world superpower.
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Old 05-07-2021, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
173 posts, read 198,701 times
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Originally Posted by View Post
Sorry, Arabic, Spanish, then German, Russian way before just because there is more than just one or two sovereign republics that are in this vital communication spectrum.
I'm not sure about Arabic. My understanding is that it's actually not one cohesive language, but at least two (probably more) separate languages - Modern Standard Arabic, which isn't really spoken by most in the Arab world in day to day life (just by media and formal settings), and the dialects, which themselves arguably represent multiple languages (of which each country has its own) which aren't necessarily mutually intelligible with each other. The fact that the language is that fractured would hinder it from gaining global importance, I would think.

I also don't think German is widespread enough (pretty much just central Europe) to be considered, despite Germany being an economic powerhouse.

My opinion, for the most globally important languages outside of English, I would consider, in no particular order, Spanish, Mandarin, Russian, and Portuguese. I doubt any of those will challenge the position of English in the near future though.
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Old 05-07-2021, 10:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I don't want to say "never," but English has such a head start on every other language as the lingua franca that it's virtually impossible that Chinese will make any inroads on that in our or our children's lifetimes.

In the first place, don't confuse the number of people who speak a language with how useful the language is. There may be a billion Mandarin speakers (actually, many Chinese nationals are not fluent in Mandarin), but almost all of them live in the same country. That makes it supremely non-useful as an international language.

Compare that to English. English has millions of native speakers in North America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Oceania, and millions more non-native speakers everywhere. Mandarin is used almost exclusively in China. That's apart from the international cultural aspect (films, music, Internet, etc.) which heavily favors English over every other language.
Mandarin speakers are very much isolated to part of China. The global Chinese diaspora is disproportionately from south and southeast China and speak Cantonese and Hakka. Mandarin's relevance is simply as a tool of the PRC government.

Also, there are limited consumers and therefore influence of modern Chinese culture using Mandarin as a medium because the government controls all media. The cultural productions/exports very much lean on propaganda and whatever message or commentary the government wants to provide to its citizens. Media still focuses on North Korea-esque dramas about war and the great fight. It's completely irrelevant to the rest of the world and generally delusional, as if millions of people didn't starve to death under PRC policies.

That is why Taiwan, Hong Kong, and to some extent, Guangdong, have played an outsized role in Chinese cultural and media exports. Music, TV, movies, celebrities, food, cultural trends, etc. It's odd that even today with China's influence, there has been limited following of their media...
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Old 05-09-2021, 05:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave120 View Post
I'm not sure about Arabic. My understanding is that it's actually not one cohesive language, but at least two
So is English. Almost every English verb can be expressed as a two-word verb (look up, come back, put together) based on Germanic roots, or one-word (consult, return, assemble) from Latin roots. One form has become customary in formal context, the other in casual. A great beauty of English is that every speaker knows both languages and can signal formality.
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Old 05-09-2021, 08:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
A good portion of Chinese in Western countries are Cantonese speaking.
The next generation of Chinese immigrants to western countries assimilate and speak English by and large… many of them no longer keep Chinese as their dialect….
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