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Old 01-10-2023, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
There are a lot of silly generalizations in this thread. The U.S has more breadth of architectural styles and so I don't think Australia or Canada can compete due to the size and history of the U.S. That said, I think Australia and Canada perform well and in Canada's case (i'm less familiar with Australia), Canada has a pretty impressive architectural collection given the age of the country and particularly given the fact it only really developed a sizable population in the 1800's

I also find it interesting that people tend to dismiss anything as being architecturally significant, if it wasn't built before 1900.
I lot of folk equate "Australia" with Sydney and Melbourne.

Comparing Darwin or Broome in the north to Hobart in the south, or inland NSW or South Australia, there historically was a lot of variation in architecture due to differences in climate and availability of building materials.

Today commercial buildings are pretty much the same globally, while there is more commonality in style for residential buildings in Aus for a range of reasons. But there are enough remaining homes of regional styles to still be noticeable: the classic "Queenslander" and NT raised homes, federation style in the southern mainland, and fairly ornate wooden homes in Tasmania that are pretty similar to New Zealand homes of their era.

As for monumental buildings, the home of the Northern Territory's legislative assembly would look totally at home in Malaysia or Brunei, which is a contrast with the federal parliament building for example.
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Old 01-10-2023, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Sydney Australia
2,352 posts, read 1,561,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
There are a lot of silly generalizations in this thread. The U.S has more breadth of architectural styles and so I don't think Australia or Canada can compete due to the size and history of the U.S. That said, I think Australia and Canada perform well and in Canada's case (i'm less familiar with Australia), Canada has a pretty impressive architectural collection given the age of the country and particularly given the fact it only really developed a sizable population in the 1800's

I also find it interesting that people tend to dismiss anything as being architecturally significant, if it wasn't built before 1900.
Most people would classify the Sydney Opera House as being significant and it was opened in 1973. The most recent building of note, which only opened last month, is the Sydney Modern, an extension to the Sydney Art Gallery.

But I love walking down Macquarie St and seeing all the beautiful architecture built in the nineteenth century. What I find amazing is the scale of many of the sandstone buildings planned or built when Sydney was still a convict settlement, with a population of only about 40,000. It showed an optimism in the future which we do not observe very much any more.
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Old 01-10-2023, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Toronto
15,102 posts, read 15,940,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakery Hill View Post
I lot of folk equate "Australia" with Sydney and Melbourne.

Comparing Darwin or Broome in the north to Hobart in the south, or inland NSW or South Australia, there historically was a lot of variation in architecture due to differences in climate and availability of building materials.

Today commercial buildings are pretty much the same globally, while there is more commonality in style for residential buildings in Aus for a range of reasons. But there are enough remaining homes of regional styles to still be noticeable: the classic "Queenslander" and NT raised homes, federation style in the southern mainland, and fairly ornate wooden homes in Tasmania that are pretty similar to New Zealand homes of their era.

As for monumental buildings, the home of the Northern Territory's legislative assembly would look totally at home in Malaysia or Brunei, which is a contrast with the federal parliament building for example.
yeah for sure I know there is more to Australian architecture than just Sydney and Melbourne although I think most people outside Australia would be by and large most familiar with them.

My comment about post 1900 is that there are notable examples including with Skyscrapers - some really iconic Pomo and International styles that shouldn't be discounted.

I do however notice a similar theme worldwide particularly with condo's and glass office buildings of the last few decades. In this regard, there are certainly less iconic structures but even still, they shouldn't be wholesale dismissed either and should be assessed on a case by case basis for their own merit. Unfortunately they get lost sometimes because there is just so much mediocrity. I get it though, cost is a big factor in all this - if everything built was done in such a way that it were iconic and unique, things would get more expensive quickly.

Add to this that Canadian and Australian cities are growing very fast due to immigration, so they are throwing up a lot more buildings than a lot of cities. People have to live somewhere!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarisaAnna View Post
Most people would classify the Sydney Opera House as being significant and it was opened in 1973. The most recent building of note, which only opened last month, is the Sydney Modern, an extension to the Sydney Art Gallery.

But I love walking down Macquarie St and seeing all the beautiful architecture built in the nineteenth century. What I find amazing is the scale of many of the sandstone buildings planned or built when Sydney was still a convict settlement, with a population of only about 40,000. It showed an optimism in the future which we do not observe very much any more.
I would say the Sydney Opera house is the most iconic piece of Architecture in Australia and deservedly so, it is a beautiful form. I'll check out the Sydney Modern since it is so new I am not familiar with it.

I've done some google map exploration of Sydney and I agree, there are some beautiful pieces. There are great cities in Canada with some beautiful architecture and yes, 19th and 20th century Victorian and Edwardian architecture does have its architectural merits - although there are certainly enough people who dismiss for whatever reason(s)

Last edited by fusion2; 01-10-2023 at 06:01 PM..
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Old 01-12-2023, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,159,184 times
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Yes the Sydney Opera House might be on the list of most iconic modern buildings in the world.

I also really like Flinders Street Station in Melbourne.

In terms of Canadian architectural styles, can't post any photos but the "château railway hotel" style from 100 years ago is pretty interesting.

There a several of these grand old hotels (that typically feature a pastiched Loire castle style) located all over the country.

To my mind, the most significant ones would be:

Château Frontenac in Quebec City

Château Laurier in Ottawa

Banff Springs Hotel in Banff

The Empress Hotel in Victoria

Look them up!
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Old 01-12-2023, 12:15 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,625,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yes the Sydney Opera House might be on the list of most iconic modern buildings in the world.

I also really like Flinders Street Station in Melbourne.

In terms of Canadian architectural styles, can't post any photos but the "château railway hotel" style from 100 years ago is pretty interesting.

There a several of these grand old hotels (that typically feature a pastiched Loire castle style) located all over the country.

To my mind, the most significant ones would be:

Château Frontenac in Quebec City

Château Laurier in Ottawa

Banff Springs Hotel in Banff

The Empress Hotel in Victoria

Look them up!
I'd add the Vancouver Hotel, Hotel MacDonald in Edmonton, and the spectacular Bessborough Hotel in Saskatoon.

https://tinyurl.com/42zvfavp
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Old 01-12-2023, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Don't forget the Fairmont Royal York which is the largest railroad hotel in Canada

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/repo...ticle21348079/
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Old 01-12-2023, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,625,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Don't forget the Fairmont Royal York which is the largest railroad hotel in Canada

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/repo...ticle21348079/
Duh!

LOL I stayed there last year. I should have thought of it.
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Old 01-12-2023, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Toronto
15,102 posts, read 15,940,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Duh!

LOL I stayed there last year. I should have thought of it.
lol no worries - like a lot of the grand 'old' architecture in Toronto kind of just gets lost in the sea.

Any good?
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Old 01-12-2023, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
18,504 posts, read 15,625,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
lol no worries - like a lot of the grand 'old' architecture in Toronto kind of just gets lost in the sea.

Any good?
The hotel is wonderful. We stayed in basic room for the night few arrived, since we were leaving the next morning for a few days.

When we came back we had booked a nicer room, much larger, had a fireplace and was on a corner overlooking Union Station. I love history, so of course we went down to the mezzanine to look at the display of the hotels history. Besides the photos of royalty and famous entertainers, there was a photo of a room, from the 1920's that looked a lot like ours. I took a photo of the photo, and compared the marble surround on the fireplace to see if it matched. It did. That and the room number which had been renumbered since then, but still basically matched, clinched it. Our room had formally been the living room of a larger suite as the old photo showed. Love stuff like that.

It was the convenience of just walking across to Union Station to catch the UP to Pearson which first attracted us to the hotel, plus car rental just in the next block.
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Old 01-12-2023, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
26,883 posts, read 38,159,184 times
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Thanks to you guys for bringing these up!

Ironically, Montreal was Canada's original railway capital where everything started from, but it doesn't really have a grand railway hotel in the heart of the city.

It used to have two.

The Windsor Hotel, which was partly demolished though some parts of it still survive as offices and ballrooms.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windsor_Hotel_(Montreal)

And the Place Viger, which is like a mini-Château Frontenac. It sat abandoned for quite some time but was renovated and repurposed a few years ago, with almost the entire structure retained.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place_Viger

What would effectively become Montreal's lasting grand railway hotel is The Queen Elizabeth (Le Reine Elizabeth) which was built around 1960 in a more brutalist style. It was I think the last of Canada's grand railway hotels to be built and its style is quite different from the others. Its claim to fame is for being home to John Lennon' and Yoko Ono's bed-in for peace, and where the song "Give Peace a Chance" was recorded.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Elizabeth_Hotel
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