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Old 07-13-2021, 10:05 PM
 
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I feel like there’s never really a discussion relating to this topic online - and I have a feeling Europeans kind of take it for granted that all three are the same.

My question is, do Canada and Australia perform well, architecturally, with the US in your mind?

Also, does Australia have anywhere that’s like a New Orleans, or a Charleston, a Quebec City, a St John’s, or a Santa Fe?

My thoughts are that Canada has the worst architecture and public spaces of the three. Quebec City, from a historical perspective, goes beyond anything Australia has, but otherwise I found even Montreal (outside of the old quarter), not to mention the rest of Canadian cities, kind of architecturally lacking for the most part. I know that’s a bold generalization, but from residential to public, suburban to urban, I found Canada lacking in the kind of grandiose or aesthetically developed monuments, cities, and towns you can find all over the US, and I found so much of the architecture in Canadian cities actually quite ugly - one comment, there seems to be a lot of brutalism in Canada, a lot more than there seems to be proportionally in other countries. Maybe this is just a matter of history. Does anyone agree or disagree, and why?

As for Australia, I found it to have pretty well developed public spaces, with good usage of flora in the built environment to make it seem altogether more welcoming. I was impressed with some of the Victorian architecture I saw in Bendigo, and thought that Australian cities were lushly cultivated overall. The only thing that I thought was a drawback is that a lot of the architecture is pretty monotonous throughout the country, and there’s not quite the history of major design and architectural movements, not to mention the wider continental European influences, that North America has, which meant that a lot of Australia’s architecture seems “overly-ordered” and timid.

The US is a massive hodgepodge of differing architectural styles and layouts across its suburbs and urban areas, but I found it to be the best country of the three for architecture. Looking at population size throughout history, I guess maybe this isn’t a surprise, but there’s a consistency of significant architectural movements that you can see in cities and towns of all sizes throughout the US. It’s true that the sprawling sunbelt modernity of cities like Houston leave a lot to be desired, but I think it’s unfair to characterize that as typical of America’s built form when it’s much newer than a lot of America, in terms of population trends. It has colonial historical areas that give it depth on top of more significant participation in (and in some cases, the spearheading of) the design, art, and architecture movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. It sometimes has a shockingly messy way of developing public spaces, but I find it much better at this overall than Canada. It has the best monuments, sculpture, and statuary of the three by far.


These are my perspectives. Thoughts?
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Old 07-13-2021, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Canada
7,363 posts, read 8,399,990 times
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This has been brought up several times and usually by the same poster.

In anycase Canada clearly has the best architecture.
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Old 07-14-2021, 02:35 AM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,024,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ginnygingin View Post

.... < snip > .... - one comment, there seems to be a lot of brutalism in Canada, a lot more than there seems to be proportionally in other countries. Maybe this is just a matter of history. Does anyone agree or disagree, and why? .... < snip > ..... These are my perspectives. Thoughts?
Can you please elaborate on what you mean about a lot of brutalism in Canada? I don't think I quite understand what you mean by the use of the word brutalism. You are talking strictly about architecture and infrastructure, right? Or are you talking about other things including the nation's Canadian society's general attitude toward architecture, as a whole? I have my own take on brutalism in Canada but I don't think it's the same kind of brutalism you might be talking about so that's why I'm asking for clarification.

Am I correct in assuming from the all-encompassing, broad sweeping way you are describing the nations in question that you have travelled through them all by land (not by air or rail) to all major cities and all provinces in Canada, you've hit the road, been there, done that, seen it all in person? Likewise with Australia .... you've visited all major cities and states in the entire country and seen it all?

For even further clarification and better perspective, could you please provide us with your own location that you call home. Thanks.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 07-14-2021 at 02:44 AM..
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Old 07-14-2021, 04:16 AM
 
Location: Various
9,049 posts, read 3,521,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Can you please elaborate on what you mean about a lot of brutalism in Canada? I don't think I quite understand what you mean by the use of the word brutalism. You are talking strictly about architecture and infrastructure, right? Or are you talking about other things including the nation's Canadian society's general attitude toward architecture, as a whole? I have my own take on brutalism in Canada but I don't think it's the same kind of brutalism you might be talking about so that's why I'm asking for clarification.

Am I correct in assuming from the all-encompassing, broad sweeping way you are describing the nations in question that you have travelled through them all by land (not by air or rail) to all major cities and all provinces in Canada, you've hit the road, been there, done that, seen it all in person? Likewise with Australia .... you've visited all major cities and states in the entire country and seen it all?

For even further clarification and better perspective, could you please provide us with your own location that you call home. Thanks.

.
Brutalism is an architectural style.
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Old 07-14-2021, 04:33 AM
 
Location: Brisbane
5,058 posts, read 7,498,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Can you please elaborate on what you mean about a lot of brutalism in Canada? I don't think I quite understand what you mean by the use of the word brutalism. You are talking strictly about architecture and infrastructure, right? Or are you talking about other things including the nation's Canadian society's general attitude toward architecture, as a whole? I have my own take on brutalism in Canada but I don't think it's the same kind of brutalism you might be talking about so that's why I'm asking for clarification.

Am I correct in assuming from the all-encompassing, broad sweeping way you are describing the nations in question that you have travelled through them all by land (not by air or rail) to all major cities and all provinces in Canada, you've hit the road, been there, done that, seen it all in person? Likewise with Australia .... you've visited all major cities and states in the entire country and seen it all?

For even further clarification and better perspective, could you please provide us with your own location that you call home. Thanks.

.
Like most things Artistic, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and from an architectural perspective and I actually like Brutalist Architecture to a degree. Their is loads of it in London, I would imagine it had to do with all the rebuilding there post ww2, and not much money to do it with.

Here is a wonderful example of the style in Montreal.

https://artsy-media-uploads.s3.amazo...tecture_FB.jpg
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Old 07-14-2021, 05:53 AM
psv
 
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The three have awful architecture.
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Old 07-14-2021, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,024,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aussiehoff View Post
Brutalism is an architectural style.
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Like most things Artistic, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and from an architectural perspective and I actually like Brutalist Architecture to a degree. Their is loads of it in London, I would imagine it had to do with all the rebuilding there post ww2, and not much money to do it with.

Here is a wonderful example of the style in Montreal.

https://artsy-media-uploads.s3.amazo...tecture_FB.jpg
Thank you both of you, that helps and I've learned something new. See now, that was not what I was thinking about, I was thinking it had to to do with certain types of architecture whose style is built to accomodate environment and climate. After seeing the image Daniel posted above I recalled having seen pictures of that building in Montreal before, it was posted in a thread in the Canada forum. So I googled images of brutalist architecture for more examples. https://www.google.ca/search?q=bruta...w=1120&bih=543

I have never seen anything remotely like the above examples in the Canadian west. Thank all the gods.

Although I'm sure such places do exist I'm just as happy to have not seen any in person because as a gardener/landscaper who likes things to flow along smoothly without any resistance or obstruction, to me they all look like monstrosities designed by people with fractured psyches and split personalities who took too many hits of acid in their youth. And they're most definitely not built with the need in mind to accomodate environment and climate.

.
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Old 07-18-2021, 03:15 AM
Status: "“If a thing loves, it is infinite.”" (set 7 hours ago)
 
Location: Great Britain
27,160 posts, read 13,444,010 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielsa1775 View Post
Like most things Artistic, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and from an architectural perspective and I actually like Brutalist Architecture to a degree. Their is loads of it in London, I would imagine it had to do with all the rebuilding there post ww2, and not much money to do it with.

Here is a wonderful example of the style in Montreal.

https://artsy-media-uploads.s3.amazo...tecture_FB.jpg
A lot of it has been demolished in London.

The main examples are Trellick Tower designed by architect Ernő Goldfinger, who played cards at the same club as Ian Fleming who wrote the James Bond books. Goldfinger also designed Balfron Tower in the East End.

Other examples include the Barbican, Queen Elizabeth Hall. Hayward Gallery and National Theatre on the Southbank as well as the Alexandra & Ainsworth Estate aka Rowley Way in Camden.

However most of the post war estates have been demolished and replaced with traditional housing and private apartments.
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Old 07-18-2021, 07:15 AM
 
910 posts, read 367,040 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
This has been brought up several times and usually by the same poster.

In anycase Canada clearly has the best architecture.
Disagree with you. I was born in Toronto, and grew up in Philadelphia so am very familiar with both cities, and really don't have a bias. Philly's architecture is far superior to Toronto in everyway. Philly's Center City has stunning architecture, where Downtown Toronto has drab architecture, with one of the ugliest city halls you will find anywhere. Even the new skyscrapers in Philly are nicer than what Toronto has.
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Old 07-18-2021, 10:43 AM
psv
 
55 posts, read 36,183 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vindag View Post
Disagree with you. I was born in Toronto, and grew up in Philadelphia so am very familiar with both cities, and really don't have a bias. Philly's architecture is far superior to Toronto in everyway. Philly's Center City has stunning architecture, where Downtown Toronto has drab architecture, with one of the ugliest city halls you will find anywhere. Even the new skyscrapers in Philly are nicer than what Toronto has.
I agree. Canadian architecture is underwhelming.

Americans have art deco which while not an American model of architecture, it managed to give the US some awesome buildings.

Canadian architecture seems to resume to glass buildings.

THE US blows australia and Canada off of the water in architecture.
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